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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2004 (October-December) » Archive through December 27, 2004 » Uafás agat ar amharclann « Previous Next »

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Akidd
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Username: Akidd

Post Number: 24
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 08:51 am:   Edit Post Print Post

for your information, i am developing characters, within storyboards. these may get killed, shoot at, wounded, and otherwise struggled, within the virtual world of a computergame.

a good result recently was a haunted cottage, i try to outline specific elements, like a black cat on the roof, or a hornets nest, and dried, unhealthy looking plants.

a single word, or a specific sentence can trigger a new item, or even a character, or a new feature.

as gaeilge nó as bearla..

but i warned you, i respect your christian religion or whatever, but for me its just a story...i do not know much about guilt, as i am not committing bad things.

computergames have a function, to make it harder for misinformations to establish.. if you would like to contribute, you can do that in irish, i will try to translate it. the scripting will be switchable to irish, so i am looking for such contribution. a good thing was the lesson with creepy words, what a pity that there was no response to it..

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Fear_na_mbróg
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Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 316
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 09:07 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Even if that post had proper punctuation, it would still read like bullshit.

Go n-éirí an t-ádh leat!

Hint: Capital letter are the start of a sentence.

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Akidd
Member
Username: Akidd

Post Number: 25
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 09:22 am:   Edit Post Print Post

its usual to use capital letters within the western languages. there is no need for it.

hint: whats true for you might not be the only wisdom. rather than telling what you dislike, talk about what you are producing, try to make constructive contributions.

you know, i like the teachers so much... and the irish seem to no bit better than what happened in school. so cant they teach me the proper names for black rats and for brown rats in irish? do i have to learn latin or what?

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Fear_na_mbróg
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Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 320
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 09:41 am:   Edit Post Print Post

TROLL ALERT

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Akidd
Member
Username: Akidd

Post Number: 28
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 10:00 am:   Edit Post Print Post

luchai francach isteach an catag.
ní fáilte isteach siad.
fáilte isteach anseo tú?
mé fáilte..

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Philosophe
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Username: Philosophe

Post Number: 15
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 10:39 am:   Edit Post Print Post

"but i warned you, i respect your christian religion or whatever, but for me its just a story...i do not know much about guilt, as i am not committing bad things"
------------------------------
what?!!!
what does this have to do with anything?

you need to explain yourself a bit better if you want people to respond to your posts
It's hard to see what the message is!

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 569
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 11:05 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Akidd; you seem to be applying the syntax of another language to Irish words. This will not work.

If you meant:
There are rats in the cottage
They are not welcome
Are you welcome here?
I welcome you

Then

Tá francaigh sa teach (or bothán)
Níl failte rompu
An bhfuil fáilte romhat anseo?
Cuirim fáilte romhat

You need to get away from the idea that word for word translations will work. Perhaps you should post in whatever your native language is, and someone might be able to follow you, and therefore help you learn Irish.

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Maidhc Ó G. (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 152.163.100.135
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 11:45 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Yes, it seems as he's trying to create a sort of 'Dungeons and Dragons' like game and he wants it to be playable in both Irish and English.
An interesting twist to this is that one might get a different action or counteraction depending on which language one chooses to go into any situation. It feels, to me, that he wants you to be able to play using one, the other, or even both languages (At the same time?) to move through different situations. Not like choosing a language and then playing - but the game being compatible simultaneously with both.
Interesting.
-Maidhc.

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Akidd
Member
Username: Akidd

Post Number: 30
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 01:28 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

#8: yep. (#=number)

#7: would it be 'Tá luchai francach sa teach'?
rompu: roimh=before rompu=before them.
mé fáilte: i am welcome. (i welcome you).
i were searching for cellar, and rats were probably a big problem in these underearth potato storages.

the syntax is not of a human language. my native language: i am not understanding them, talking hours, hours, no results. similiar to some politic discussions, if you know what i mean.
my native is being logical, whatever language.
i know that word-for-word is not the correct translation. i am trying to learn more words, and i have grammar books. to understand them, i need more words...

#6:meaning psych threats by one of us, who claims his irish reading would be the 'an bíobla', or he would mix aspirin and whiskey (or is it whisky) for his translations. people were shoot for less in north america of 1870, and it was clearly offensive. (it has to do somehing with a post made recently)

(Message edited by akidd on December 10, 2004)

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Akidd
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Username: Akidd

Post Number: 31
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 01:30 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

níl fáilte na luchai francach sa teach??

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Maidhc Ó G. (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 152.163.100.135
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 01:49 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Níl fáilte orthusa i mosa theach!

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Akidd
Member
Username: Akidd

Post Number: 34
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 02:16 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

mosach=nasty, filty?
orthu=them orthusa=them for things??

they are not welcome even in the filty house??

its more about rats on the screen (in the game), and there will be more, like giant spiders.

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Maidhc Ó G. (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 152.163.100.135
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 02:44 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

THEY are not welcome in MY house!

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 571
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 03:27 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Maidhc, you cannot add "sa" to mo in that way.

Níl fáilte rompu i mo theachsa


Akidd - your application of "logic" to a natural language is not logical. Also, turning Padraigs whimsy into an affront to you is not terribly logical.

And will you please finally get the message that "lucha francacha" is incorrect. A rat is francach, pure and simple.

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Akidd
Member
Username: Akidd

Post Number: 36
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 03:35 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

lucha francacha ag rince

frenchman dancing

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 574
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 03:44 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

No actually, it means "French mice dancing"

What you want is "Francaigh ag rince" the context will make it clear whether men or rodents are meant.

Or you could say "Lucha móra ag rince"

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 575
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 03:49 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

By the way - what is the title of this thread meant to be?

Uafás agat ar amharclann

Uafás is horror, amharclann is a theatre (for plays)

But I think you have got hold of the wrong end of the stick for personal pronouns like agat and mé.

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Maidhc Ó G. (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 205.188.116.136
Posted on Saturday, December 11, 2004 - 01:29 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Aonghuis,
GRMA don gceartúchán. I mixed up with the emphatic 'mise' there. Tá sé agam anois.

-Maidhc.

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Akidd
Member
Username: Akidd

Post Number: 38
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Saturday, December 11, 2004 - 01:37 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

horror at you in theatre

in german: 'im sarg mit 30 ratten'
in english: 'in the coffin with 30 rats'

long form: 'being together with thirty rats in the coffin'

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 579
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Saturday, December 11, 2004 - 03:37 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Sa chónra le tríocha francach

Bheith sa chónra le tríocha francach

"Horror at you" means "You" has done something to horrify the speaker. Is that the meaning you intend?

Uafás romhat san amharclann, then

If you mean "you, horrified, in the theatre"
Uafás ortsa san amharclann.

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 580
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Saturday, December 11, 2004 - 03:39 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Deutsch waere das der unterschied zwischen

Ensetzt von dir im Theater

oder

Du, entsetzt, im Theater

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Akidd
Member
Username: Akidd

Post Number: 39
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Sunday, December 12, 2004 - 10:40 am:   Edit Post Print Post

grammar was always a book with seven seals for me..

its more a virtual 'theatre': including the making of level models (cemetery), the fright of the players, the point is 'having a theatre', or 'letting a virtual world play'--

in german there would be something like: schreckensgruft, i do not know if 'de olde burrow' is correct english.

'de olde burrow' in irish?

for the theatre, it might be amharclann scanrúil.

its a haunted cottage, an abandoned hotel in the countryside with skeletons in the pool, and a graveyard including funeral shoppe and crypta.

pg13 (parental guidance) means moderate levels of horror, not neccessarily showing tortures.
but rats, skulls, bat, etc.

a better label would be 'virtual theatre', but the first of these words is not always fully understood by the most people.

this would result in an internal label
VTHEATRE1.0, as gaeilge AMSCRUI1.0

its my job to invent labels...

Aonghus, you were outlining very well why i do not understand german..the difference between you and 'Du' is well known..i dunno how it is exactly in gaeilge..)

the german outlining sounds a bit womanish.. and thats the last thing for a computer game..well, there is something such like, but its different, more mad-magazine like, even monty phyton.

no, i am not a fan, have not seen it for years, but can remember the life of the brian. as far as i know its called 'black british humor'..

now, as gaeilge, i am looking for a spooky halloween, and to provide the exact atmosphere within the game graphics, dialogues, and story scripting.

the point is, now it becomes interesting, the dialogues will be spoken, by using samples on cd-rom. they are more monologues, i know, but there will be interaction, multiple choice, even free text entering (theme based) by the player.

if there is a good story, good graphics, its less difficult as one might assume.

(assume=To take for granted; suppose), and that's the exact meaning i had in mind...

(Message edited by akidd on December 12, 2004)

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Akidd
Member
Username: Akidd

Post Number: 40
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Sunday, December 12, 2004 - 10:49 am:   Edit Post Print Post

b.t.w. (by the way) a game for the international market cannot be offensive against french people, as this can lead to legal affairs, over 18 rating, banning, very high fines...

so it would be lucha mór ag rince.
or: Sa chónra le tríocha lucha mór.
but it needs a single word, to sound 'continious', 'liquid', 'naturalistic'.

luacha francacha would be o.k., probably, but one has to be sure, before publishing, as it can get bad press by thousands of french people...

so why to the bullix is alex making it so complicated? i have seen (were buying it actually) a full price r.p.g. with sampled dialogues, the demo (in english), for free, is very good narrating. the german narrating sounds artificially, sorry. the game is called dungeon siege, and the demo is around 200mbyte.

if one going to fix me to this game, its 2 1/2 years ago i were playing it...

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Máirín
Member
Username: Máirín

Post Number: 4
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Sunday, December 12, 2004 - 01:34 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Akidd,a chara,
I thought you were trying to be like James Joyce, no puncuation or capitalization.

Máirín

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 591
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, December 13, 2004 - 07:06 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Akidd.

I think you are biting off more than you can manage. To translate successfully, you need fluency in both the source and target language; at the moment you seem to have neither.

And I have neither the time nor the interest to continue posting on this, sorry.

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Akidd
Member
Username: Akidd

Post Number: 54
Registered: 11-2004


Posted on Monday, December 13, 2004 - 11:29 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Aonghus. U R so cool. you got it. biting off.

let others translate. what i need is to understand successfully, and if it sounds artificially to me, its wrong. (how egocentric)

Máirín: there are people who love dolphis (deilph), without any relation to ireland. i do not know James Joyce more than he he is a writer. i must admit, i am not very literate.

however, i employ stops at the end of a sentence, two or threee points indicating that more could be said, or something was not said. for names, capitalization makes sense.

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Akidd
Member
Username: Akidd

Post Number: 55
Registered: 11-2004


Posted on Monday, December 13, 2004 - 11:33 am:   Edit Post Print Post

anyone up for

'funeral shoppe'
'abandon hope all ye who enter here'
'de olde burrow'

as gaeilge?

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Pádraig
Member
Username: Pádraig

Post Number: 90
Registered: 09-2004
Posted on Monday, December 13, 2004 - 12:21 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Níl ar chor ar bith! a'tall a'tall.

Gabh mo leithscéal agus mo 'whimsey.' How's that for messing with the idiom? ... Not to be confused with idiocy.

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Akidd
Member
Username: Akidd

Post Number: 60
Registered: 11-2004


Posted on Tuesday, December 14, 2004 - 08:56 am:   Edit Post Print Post

its not the gaelic equivalent for 'funeral shopping centre' or 'SUPERDIE'/'EUROCOFFIN'.

thats stuff for the mad magazine, but i am looking for the english spoken in ireland three hundred years ago. but there will be grog vending machines, though.

so you have a label for a grog vending machine, style=mechanical, a bit rusty.. and as gaeilge..
not what the dictionary says, but what sounds 'cool'. isnt it a anglicized name (brought to english), and it became an adjective.

Main Entry: 2adjective
Function: noun
: a word belonging to one of the major form classes in any of numerous languages and typically serving as a modifier of a noun to denote a quality of the thing named, to indicate its quantity or extent, or to specify a thing as distinct from something else



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