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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2004 (October-December) » Keep away from fire « Previous Next »

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Akidd
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Username: Akidd

Post Number: 2
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Saturday, December 04, 2004 - 03:39 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

i have a nike tricot, with a notice in all european languages (its quite long): keep away from fire. the reason is (obviously): its made of PE (polyethylen), and melts easy.

aonther thing is that there is no irish translation, there is such a great sense of humor here, like smoking in the DART, £500 fine or imprisonment or both, in two languages. a way of understanding 'dó rúd'.

now, does anybody know why there is no irish translation in the imprint?

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Seán a' Chaipín (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 82.69.43.131
Posted on Saturday, December 04, 2004 - 04:42 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

WTF us a "nike tricot"?

Níl a leithéid san oileán, go bhfios dom.

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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 12.75.254.229
Posted on Saturday, December 04, 2004 - 07:28 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Because any true Gaelgeoir wouldn't be stupid enough to put it near the fire.

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Jonas
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Username: Jonas

Post Number: 548
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Saturday, December 04, 2004 - 08:26 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

i have a nike tricot, with a notice in all european languages

I would be very much surprised indeed if that notice would be in even half the languages of Europe. :-)

There are more than 100 European languages still alive and spoken in Europe. I would be prepared to bet that languages such as Carelian, Livonian, Sapmi, Occitan, Frisian, Faroese, Breton, Tatar, Istriot, Friulian, Karaim, Vlach and many more are found there...

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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 213.202.145.206
Posted on Sunday, December 05, 2004 - 04:18 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Can you believe that there are over 6,000 languages in the world but it's said that only half of those are 'live' languages, the others are only spoken by older people and aren't being taught to young children. They say by the end of the century that 90% of these languages will be gone.
I hope this doesn't happen with Irish, I think people should be educated in this way in school, told how Irish could become extinct if not used, maybe it would spur some youths into action!! People always seem to like to have a cause to fight for.

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Akidd
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Username: Akidd

Post Number: 3
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Sunday, December 05, 2004 - 09:32 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

the notice is indeed very long, including even slawish and russian, 22 translations. i mean the official languages, so it should include irish.

the message from the DART is 'PIONÓS €500 NO PRÍOSÚNACHT NÓ AN DÁ RUD', these are in both languages, as well as the street names.

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 526
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Sunday, December 05, 2004 - 11:46 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

The rat was brought into Irealnd by the Normans.
Francach is short for "Luch francach" (French mouse)

In Donegal they call the animal luch mór

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Lúcas
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Username: Lúcas

Post Number: 77
Registered: 01-2004


Posted on Sunday, December 05, 2004 - 11:59 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Aonghus, I wonder if the same can be said for the Irish for syphilis, bolgach fhrancach? Did the Normans bring it to Ireland along with the rats?

Mise le meas,

Lúcas

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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 12.75.182.84
Posted on Sunday, December 05, 2004 - 01:01 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

In England they call it the French disease but the French call it the English disease. Don't know who had the dubious distinction of introducing it

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Jonas
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Username: Jonas

Post Number: 549
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Sunday, December 05, 2004 - 03:40 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

the notice is indeed very long, including even slawish and russian, 22 translations. i mean the official languages, so it should include irish.

Quite interesting! As there are only 36 languages in Europe that are the official language in at least one European country, one wonders why they didn't bother to include the last 14. I fully agree that Irish should have been included on that list as well, but at least there are 13 larger official European languages that didn't make that notice either. (By the way, there is no such language as "slawisch".)

Here is a list of the 36 languages that are official in a European country, ranked according to the number of native speakers within Europe:

1 Russian
2 German
3 English
4 French
5 Italian
6 Turkish
7 Polish
8 Ukrainian
9 Spanish
10 Romanian
11 Dutch
12 Hungarian
13 Serbian
14 Czech
15 Portuguese
16 Greece
17 Swedish
18 Bulgarian
19 Belarussian
20 Catalan
21 Croatian
22 Slovakian
23 Finnish
24 Danish
25 Norwegian
26 Albanian
27 Bosnian
28 Lithuanian
29 Moldovan
30 Slovenian
31 Macedonian
32 Latvian
33 Estonian
34 Maltese
35 Icelandic
36 Irish

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 528
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, December 06, 2004 - 04:20 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Since syphilis has the reputation of having been spread by sailors, and is a popular thing to blame on others....

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Ó_diocháin
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Username: Ó_diocháin

Post Number: 53
Registered: 09-2004
Posted on Monday, December 06, 2004 - 07:50 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Jonas, a chara,
I'd be interested to know the source of your list of official languages and the figures which rank them in the order that you give.
Euskera and Galician both enjoy the same status as Catalan - i.e. they are co-offical languages of defined areas within Spain according to Article 2 of the 1978 Constitution. I would therefore have expected both to appear on your list.
It also looks to me as though the ranking of English, French and Italian at 3, 4 and 5 would be correct if based on population figures for Britain and Ireland (English), France and Italy, but I have Council of Europe figures (from 1999) which give Italian as the second most widely spoken first language in the then EU, coming out ahead of both English and French due to the substantial number of speakers of Italian as their first language elsewhere in Europe - especially in France, Germany, Britain and Ireland. These figures would order the three languages Italian, English, French.
Slán beo!
Chris

(Message edited by Ó_diocháin on December 06, 2004)

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Jonas
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Username: Jonas

Post Number: 551
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Monday, December 06, 2004 - 10:06 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

A Chris, a chara!

I only included languages official languages of European countries, so I didn't include regional languages such as Galician, Euskara, Welsh, Frisian, Sápmi, Faroese etc. Catalan was included based on the fact that it is the official language of Andorra. :-)

I based the order of the languages on Ethnologue. The smaller the language, the more precise it is. Just as you say, many Italians live in other parts of Europe and it might well be that Italian is spoken by more people than English and French. The order of these three languages was the hardest part to decide.

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Ó_diocháin
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Username: Ó_diocháin

Post Number: 54
Registered: 09-2004
Posted on Monday, December 06, 2004 - 11:15 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

A Jonas, a chara,
I can understand your listing and rankings now. I do, however, think that there is a good case for ordering Italian ahead of English and French.
The issue of regional languages is a very thorny question... is Wales not a country rather than a region? (Even if it is effectively a "domestic dependant nation", if I might use an Americanism to describe it. I'm not sufficiently au fait with Danish constitutional arrangements to be sure if the same could be said of the Faroes, although I suspect that it might be the case.)
The terminology used in Spain specifically refers to the Basques, Catalans and Galicians as "naciones históricas", a use of language that does reflect the historic evolution of the Spanish state as an alliance among nations.
Tá meas mór agam as d'eolas of language policy issues ach tá ceist agam ort freisin - whose definition of nation should we accept and use in discussions of this sort?
Níl a fhois agam... agus tá mé ag obair in this field!!!
Beir bua agus beannacht agat!
Chris

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Antaine
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Username: Antaine

Post Number: 102
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Monday, December 06, 2004 - 12:33 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

ethnologue is a nice idea, but its figures are almost 10 years out of date

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Akidd
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Username: Akidd

Post Number: 7
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Monday, December 06, 2004 - 12:48 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

thank you, now i know that luch francach means french mouse. i would guess that's the black rat, which is smaller, not much bigger than a mouse. they are nearly extinct here in ireland, as far as i know.

is there a different name for the brown, or norwegian rat (they can get upto two kilograms fat)? there is a population of these brown rats here in dublin, i were feeding them last year.

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Akidd
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Username: Akidd

Post Number: 8
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Monday, December 06, 2004 - 12:50 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

what means WTF, as i have seen the usage of GRMA?

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Akidd
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Username: Akidd

Post Number: 9
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Monday, December 06, 2004 - 01:08 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

'slawish' languages: polish, czech, slowakian: these are abbreviated in the list with two letters, like PL,CZ, etc.

for icelandic, its understandable because its too cold there to wear it.

sometimes there are inscriptions on white spirit bottles, 'do not use to light fires'. now, if people are reading 'keep away from fire', it may cause the opposite thing.

but indeed, plastic clothing tends to get damaged by heat, even from smoking or soldering.

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 534
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, December 06, 2004 - 03:28 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Francach means the larger rat which came in with the Normans, and displaced the native rat. I'm not sure what the name for the native rat is.

The correct english group term for the languages you mentioned is "Slav languages"

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Paul (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 66.152.218.225
Posted on Monday, December 06, 2004 - 04:43 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

A chairde,
Getting back to my favorite word, “mac tíre,”
does the Father Dineen dictionary have word
origins? If so, I’d be interested to hear what
the background of this word is. (I don’t own a copy).

I have a Japanese-speaking friend
who spent time in a rural area in Japan that had a lot of
monkeys running wild. She said the
area’s farmers all referred to them
as “uncle of the forest.”
Just thought I’d pass that along...

Go raibh maith agaibh.

Le meas,
Paul

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Jonas
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Username: Jonas

Post Number: 552
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Monday, December 06, 2004 - 06:00 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

A Chris, a chara

Tá meas mór agam as d'eolas of language policy issues ach tá ceist agam ort freisin - whose definition of nation should we accept and use in discussions of this sort?

Go raibh maith agat! You're absolutely right, defining nations is notoriously difficulyt. Of course, for independent countries there is (in Europe) no such problem and that's why I based the languages on the independent countries. While Wales and Catalonia are nations and (at least in the Swedish sense of the word) countries, they are not independent. As you know very well, there are people in both regions who like to see that changed ;-) but I'll followed the present situation.


Scríobh Akidd:

'slawish' languages: polish, czech, slowakian: these are abbreviated in the list with two letters, like PL,CZ, etc

I thought you ment those. The name is 'Slavic languages', thogh - not 'Slawisch' unless we're speaking German.

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Antóin (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 159.134.181.233
Posted on Monday, December 06, 2004 - 06:01 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

The brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) arrived in Britain and Ireland in the eighteenth century and quickly replaced the black rat (Rattus rattus)

The black rat is believed to have arrived in Ireland about the same time as the Normans. It would have arrived anyway as it spread to islands everywhere aboard ship. Many plants and animals that arrived from abroad were given the adjective Francach / French in Ireland. There was no rat in Ireland before the arrival of the black rat so the unfamiliar animal was given the name Luch Francach (French mouse). The name then became shortened to 'francach'. It is now believed to be extinct in Ireland. The name just transferred to the new species.

The official full Irish name for the brown rat is the equivalent of the English i.e. "Francach donn"

The black rat is "francach dubh"

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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 12.75.184.16
Posted on Monday, December 06, 2004 - 09:03 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

And the turkey is cearc francach - french heb - as in the 12 Days of Christmas.

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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 213.94.214.131
Posted on Tuesday, December 07, 2004 - 04:21 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

mac tíre, monkeys in the forest: here in dublin its quite common to have fires on the streets, not only on halloween, when there was a really large one, approximately fifteen metres, even more in height.

there are loads of animals here in dublin, one would never guess, like a fox in a construction area, and many many rats.

wolves are extinct here, as well as there is not very much forest anymore. the reason is that the irish people were making coal from all the wood, and of course built a lot of ships.

one time in germany, i made a fire on the yard where i used to live, and a neighbour threatened he would call the police. it was a bit too high, because i added two cans of spirit, but not more than three meteres. there is nothing mythical like forest with wolves, these are completely filled with hunting cabins in germany.

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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 213.94.214.131
Posted on Tuesday, December 07, 2004 - 04:31 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

scríobh jonas: slavic- i thought it would be the same spelling as one would say "jewish"- for a jewman, also 'a hebrew': a search had the result that the spelling 'hebrewish' is correct.

some people like me were writing buisiness, instead of business. i know it's related to the english language, but for towns like castlebar it's important to spell such words correct, and to know what they mean.

sometimes there are spelling alternatives between a scientific term, and a titulation.

slavish: 168,000 results
slavic: 743,000 results

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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 213.94.214.131
Posted on Tuesday, December 07, 2004 - 04:34 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

back to the rats:

francach: french, frenchman
luch francach: french mouse, meaning rat

brown rat (rattus norvegicus):
luch francach donn?
black rat (rattus rattus):
luch francach dubh?

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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 213.94.214.131
Posted on Tuesday, December 07, 2004 - 04:40 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

it was not my intention to bring the correct terms for rats, and the spelling for slavic, or even jewish people so close together.

in books about dublin's tenement history, sixty people together in one house, it was a terrible time, these are also very close together:
dublin was full of rats, also mice, described with the term 'vermin'
in these books, there are descriptions of jewmen, which collected scrap, and lent money.

hopefully nobody reads in something against these people, they were not very loved, but necessary in these times to borrow money from them.

these books are very impressive, even if the most of these buildings are taken down now.

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Akidd
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Username: Akidd

Post Number: 10
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Tuesday, December 07, 2004 - 04:41 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

the last three posts are my writing, i were not logged in, it's 9am here.

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 537
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Tuesday, December 07, 2004 - 04:42 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Nee. Machs nicht schwieger als es ist!

Hebrew is both a noun and an adjective
Slav people, Slav or Slavic language

Slavish means "like a slave" - google is not a dictionary

And "luch" is commonly dropped when francach is used. An up north they never used francach - the call the animal "Luch mór"

Time for some humour;

Many, many years ago, I woke my parents early one Saturday saying "Tá francach ag an ndoras tosaigh" - some confusion ensued, until they realised that I meant a French person - an unexpected visitor.

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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 12.75.190.102
Posted on Tuesday, December 07, 2004 - 06:29 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

And how did they make coal from wood? Can you make wood from coal as well?

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 545
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, December 08, 2004 - 04:40 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Huh? Do you mean charcoal? (Holzkohle in German)

This is wood heated at a high temperature but with very little oxygen. Then it becomes a very efficient fuel afterwards. But what thread (or planet even) are you on?

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Akidd
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Username: Akidd

Post Number: 11
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Wednesday, December 08, 2004 - 07:09 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

luch mór means "great" mouse. the point is that black rats are much smaller, have bigger ears, squeak louder and have a more nasty behaviour. anyway, as far as i know they are extinct in ireland.

Scríobh Aonghus:
But what thread (or planet even) are you on?

keep away from fire. a solution would be to get rid of the nike plastic, because of the heat of the fire. but most of my throusers are plastic too, because its easy to clean, comfortable and cheap. these items can melt, or get little holes into them from fire. no, i am not dancing without throusers around the fire.

my question was why they do not tell it to the irish people.

--------
slavish is indeed derivated from the word slave...
but.. turkish is the correct spelling for a turk.
my english can take improvements..

in irish, i try to understand how to make the plural forms (i.e. how to say pieces of coal, or even coals): like an t-sraid, na sraide

means i am not completely off-topic.

in slang language, the black rats are also called ship rats, as well as 'wander'-rats in german for the big brown rats (rattus norvegicus). its not that they gnaw on people who 'wander' around, if the nourishment becomes scare, they 'wander' to a different area, even crossing rivers.

and in irish it's simly great mouse, or are there more words?

[timeline for the alphabet tree]http://uk.geocities.com/miracleworldsoftware/lang_jp/alphatree.jpg
[i have another tree, which shows irish and english have common roots]

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 546
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, December 08, 2004 - 07:16 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I checked some of my books last night, and it seems that "luch" is used for several rodents, not all of which are called mice in english.

I still don't understand the point of the wood/coal question.

As for the label: It's quite simple - there is no legal obligation on them to label goods in Irish. There are probably legal obligations for all the other official languages they have used.

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Akidd
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Username: Akidd

Post Number: 12
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Wednesday, December 08, 2004 - 10:12 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

the point is, some people are trying to seperate everthing, no english allowed, fire forbidden very strictly, spraycans are dangerous.

me is making fires, here in ireland, charcoal or not (its gets a little amount), wearing nike trikots, sometimes only throusers.
observing squirrels, foxes and brown rats, and feeding the last.

wouldn't you guess, i would like to start writing down these things in irish...and i were always liking making fire for a long time of years, the irish are liking it too, burning scrap on the streets sometimes, its smelling of old tyres and so on.

unfortunately, my irish is very little, but it gets more..its not much more than fifty words, i can hardly spell out conna setatu- how are you.
but the rats here do like me..i even have seen some in the city centre. thre is also a lot of rodent bait, but not everywhere.

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Akidd
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Username: Akidd

Post Number: 13
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Wednesday, December 08, 2004 - 10:17 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

the label: the item is made in malaysia, sold here on the irish market, very nice colors, imprint even in turkish and russian.

so you would imply these have a more advanced legal system than ireland, where smoking in D.A.R.T. trains is heavily fined, which is explained in both languages?

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 548
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, December 08, 2004 - 11:29 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I think you're missing the point.

Iarnród Éireann which runs the DART, is a state company; it is obliged by a specific law to have bilingual signage.

The laws for labelling differ from country to country - if you want to sell your product in a country, you must comply with their labelling laws. As far as I know, there is no requirement in Ireland for a warning label to be in Irish. So obviously, Nike won't bother.

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Akidd
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Username: Akidd

Post Number: 16
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Wednesday, December 08, 2004 - 02:01 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

you are missing points:

-i am just claiming land.
-there should be such a requirement.

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 550
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, December 08, 2004 - 03:27 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I agree there should be such a requirement; I hope that as the language act takes hold there will be.

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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 12.75.193.96
Posted on Wednesday, December 08, 2004 - 06:22 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Aonghus - read the paragraph beginning "wolves are extinct here"..... submitted by Unregistered guest on Dec. 07 @ 4:21 which raises the wood/coal question. What's his planet?

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 553
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, December 09, 2004 - 04:41 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Ah, now I see

quote:

wolves are extinct here, as well as there is not very much forest anymore. the reason is that the irish people were making coal from all the wood, and of course built a lot of ships.



I don't believe that charcoal burning was common in Ireland. A lot of forests were cut down by the British to build ships, and also to drive out the Irish rebels. Because the land below was boggy, it did not recover. And some forests may have been cut down for firewood.

But charcoal is associated with Industry such as steel - which never really happened in Ireland.

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Akidd
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Username: Akidd

Post Number: 18
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Thursday, December 09, 2004 - 04:48 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

he (unregistred guest) can give you that answer rather than others for him.

Posted on Monday, December 06, 2004 - 04:43 pm:
"mac tíre..." where tíre=wolf

he does not like the idea he would be specifically connected to forests (and would not understand i.e. a big city, like being from the stone age)- just preventive information.

which planet- depends on the fare.
wood cannot be made instantly, its growing slowly.

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Akidd
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Username: Akidd

Post Number: 19
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Thursday, December 09, 2004 - 04:50 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

aonghus: as far as i know, the irish people were warfarers for many centuries, and used to make a lot of swords, axes and so on. this was long before the quarrels with the british people.

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 555
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, December 09, 2004 - 04:54 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Alex, you are losing me again.

If you prefer you (or unregistered guest, if you are not the same person) can use the term "faolchú" for wolf

and tír does not have the narrow meaning of country as opposed to city. But
a) cities did not exist in Gaelic Ireland; apart perhaps from the monasteries.
b) I have yet to hear of an urban wolf. Urban foxes and wild boards I have heard of, so urban wolves are possible.

I find your posts hard to follow, because you seem to have several threads of thought in them which are hard to disentangle.

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Akidd
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Username: Akidd

Post Number: 20
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Thursday, December 09, 2004 - 10:32 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

life itself has unexpected threads, like an 'urban' fox (you named it- its the right description). he is around a large construction area, and there are some bones.

i will keep it in mind, to log in always before posting. expect from introducing , people should register...

yes, in these time irish was mostly spoken and not written (except from ogham), with wider meanings of words, thats one reason why i like it!would have been difficult to keep 200k words in mind, german has even the double amount as far as i know...

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 557
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, December 09, 2004 - 10:47 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I suspect Irish has more words than German if you disregard compound words in German.

And I think the human brain can store lots and lots of words. 200k is not that much.

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Pádraig
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Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 12:13 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

There is quite a difference between the stream of consciousness writing styles of a James Joyce or a William Faulker and the psychotic non-sequiturs of a back ward resident in need of a thorazine push in his IV.

Am I the only one who is confused by this thread?

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Aonghus
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Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 05:09 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

No.

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Jonas
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Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 05:10 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

níl tú id aonar, a chara...

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Pádraig
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Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 06:57 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Is nuacht maith é sin, buíochas le Dia, agus go raibh maith agaibh, a chairde.

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Akidd
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Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 07:55 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Pádraig: thats offensive. see psychologytoday.com
if you need help. (Pádraig specific ends)

the main subject was that there is no law for warning signs on products (which are sold on the irish market)----- that they must be in eglish and irish.

another thing were the exact irish words for 'rat'- it seems to be thats a french mouse.

Pádraig: (from castlebar) a mentally challenged drroling pillock. i dont know what a pillock is, but it sounds more ridiciolous than your 'back ward resident'. if you misunderstand something, see my site about human sacrification. (Pádraig specific ends)

others:
that's confusing.. are the stories about the fianna are also confusing for you.. means you are not understanding them? definetively irish, written in native or not.

slango foill for this post...

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Seosamh Mac Muirí (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 08:03 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Scéal gan leigheas a chairde, foighid is fearr air.

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Akidd
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Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 08:10 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

i am trying to translate the replies you make..fire attracts coyotes.

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Akidd
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Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 08:27 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

yesterday here in ireland. i have seen a police officer, talking to a lad. he said, if he would not be more respectful, arrest would follow immediately. now, there are fines upto €3000 euro (around $5000) for smoking a single cigarette.

the reason for this is that smoking sucks! (thats what smokers are doing psysically).

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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 08:46 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

What's the frequency, Kenneth?

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Fear_na_mbróg
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Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 09:11 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

quote:

yesterday here in ireland. i have seen a police officer, talking to a lad. he said, if he would not be more respectful, arrest would follow immediately. now, there are fines upto €3000 euro (around $5000) for smoking a single cigarette.

the reason for this is that smoking sucks! (thats what smokers are doing psysically).




The intelligence... cá bhfuil sí?

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Akidd
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Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 09:26 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

a bullet is just a quarter, but its not a solution.

yesterday, there was a picture of (irish) guns and ammunition in the 'irish news', loads of them, its so ill-fashioned. its not fiction, its a real threat.

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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 01:40 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Scéal gan leigheas a chairde, foighid is fearr air.

Your point is well made and well taken, a Seosamh. My father used to say, "if you can't say something nice, say nothing."

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Akidd
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Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 01:53 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Scéal gan leigheas a chairde, foighid is fearr air.

have patience with him

people saying nice things, are sometimes getting a laughter, or its misunderstood.

i try to be as much polite as i can at my site. i expect the same of people talking to me.

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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 02:04 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Maith go leor, a hAlech. Just out of curiosity, what is your first language? Some of what you write suggests you're in Dublin, but some of your English is difficult to follow.

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Akidd
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Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 02:22 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

can you list the passages which are difficult to follow? i know, sometimes i make long sentences,
and thats from german. i try to work around my weak points. it gets better, as i watch 'tellie' and read the 'news'.

however, i do not understand my native language, even if i know the correct spelling.

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Pádraig
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Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 04:05 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Akidd, a chara,

Is German your native language? If not German, what is it? I think that if we knew you were struggling with English as opposed to thinking illogically, we could be more helpful in asnwering your posts.

Maith dom, a chara. Chreid mé bhi tú ag glagaireacht.

Siocháin

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Akidd
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Posted on Saturday, December 11, 2004 - 01:10 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Siocháin-

whereever matches, wood and true people are.its not which language one chooses, its how one spells it.

i try to utilize the english language in an understandable way:

http://uk.geocities.com/miracleworldsoftware/htm/legal.htm

a word-to-word translation to irish would mutilate the message, but it should not be impossible to write something with the same meaning.

i tawt i were not that silly, using passive forms, that no responsibility could be taken for other people's action... (it's not 'i were thinkin'')

(Message edited by akidd on December 11, 2004)

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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted on Saturday, December 11, 2004 - 02:12 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Let the record show: thástáil mé.

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Aonghus
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Posted on Saturday, December 11, 2004 - 03:33 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

If you mean "I tried" then it is "Rinne mé iarracht"

Ach is deacair iarracht duine gan ainm a chlarú.

I am beginning to think Alex is something of a mystagogue, and does not want to reveal his native langauge for reasons of his own. That's fine by me. But he cannot complain of being misunderstood if he doesn't help those who try to understand him.

http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=mystagogue

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Pádraig
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Posted on Saturday, December 11, 2004 - 06:32 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Aonghus, a chara,

Is ea. And yes, I looked at the iarracht entry in foclóir and wasn't sure where to go with it. Thought I could get away with tástáil. I count it a plus that you made sense of it at all.

Also, the post immediately before your last was mine. I forgot to log on. Thought I might as well take blame or credit as the case may be. I seem to have developed a knack for being misunderstood lately, even in English.

As to your other observation: Druid, perhaps?

Pat

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Natalie
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Posted on Saturday, December 11, 2004 - 06:43 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Well, this is a very interesting conversation if only I understood what was really going on in it! Oh well, it is keeping me entertained!

Natalie

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Pádraig
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Posted on Saturday, December 11, 2004 - 09:39 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Níl tú id aonar ach oiread, A Natalie, a chara.

And I'm in the middle of it!

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Diarmuid
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Posted on Saturday, December 11, 2004 - 09:48 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Don't worry iam in the same boat Nat! It must be our age showing. By the way how old are you again?

Diarmuid

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Aonghus
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Posted on Sunday, December 12, 2004 - 05:17 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I'd be reluctant to give Alex the credit for being a "Draoi" - I think he is giving the appearance of mystery without the substance. And the whole lot is being strained through at least two languages.

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Pádraig
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Posted on Sunday, December 12, 2004 - 05:41 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Táim seasca is a seacht bliain (chóir a bheith)

Or were you asking Natalie?

(Message edited by pádraig on December 12, 2004)

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Natalie
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Posted on Sunday, December 12, 2004 - 10:26 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I'm sixteen (tá mé sé bliana déag d'aois?) but I think this confusion is a sort of universal thing! We all seem to have a touch of it!

Natalie

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Akidd
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Posted on Sunday, December 12, 2004 - 11:13 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

a fire is a good place to start a conversation..
and 'keep away' may cause the opposite thing..
the original topic was why the imprint is is in 22 languages, but not in irish (nike product, sold on the irish market).

hope it brings light into the confusion..

(Message edited by akidd on December 12, 2004)

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Natalie
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Posted on Monday, December 13, 2004 - 08:14 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Ok, well I have a question then. You said in the original post that you have a "nike tricot". What is that? I obviously know what Nike is...just not what a tricot is...though I'm sure I will be embarrassed with the answer all the same.

Natalie

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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted on Monday, December 13, 2004 - 10:10 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Natalie - nylon tricot is a fabric used in lightweight sports clothing. Perhaps he means a jacket or shirt of some sort.

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Aonghus
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Posted on Tuesday, December 14, 2004 - 04:13 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Trikot is the german word for "pullover" or "shirt"

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Akidd
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Posted on Tuesday, December 14, 2004 - 08:15 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

who of you were visiting the www.nike.com website?
you can by shoes and other items there, with personalized ID tags. for me, it would be ALX, rather not 'german', as this would be more than embarrassing printed on the back of a shoe.

Aonghus:
and even if tricot would be a synonym for pants, (its not) thats nothing special. its not the word for pullover, it means designed as sportswear.

instead of pointing at my german origin, why dont you visit the carroll's gift store here in dublin- they have stickers, and keyring tags with >pogmotoin< , and thats setting ME up. have you ever seen dublin?

(Message edited by akidd on December 14, 2004)

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Akidd
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Posted on Tuesday, December 14, 2004 - 08:20 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

to the others:

the point is not if it is entertaining or embarrassing someone.

there should be a regulation, to have all labels (tesco, iceland, ...) in english AND irish.

no, its not about wal*mart or kmart. (these are shopping centre brands in northern america)

(Message edited by akidd on December 14, 2004)

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Akidd
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Posted on Tuesday, December 14, 2004 - 08:30 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

lightweight sports clothing-

http://www.tommyatkinsonsports.com/football.htm

that what i meant with a tricot. but its a basketball item. so far, there are also pants..

probably not what you had in mind...

the correct definition is: nylon micro mesh reversible athletic tank (sounds artificially).
and the (my) nike item has many tiny holes in it, but the backside is solid cotton. so the backside is heat resitent.

(Message edited by akidd on December 14, 2004)

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Fear_na_mbróg
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Posted on Tuesday, December 14, 2004 - 08:31 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

All the points made here are from lovers of the Irish language.

If you think of it from a purely logical point of view though... there is no "need" to have any labels in Irish -- everyone in this country that speaks Irish also speaks English (I presume... if not, then it's upwards of 99%), so it could argued that an Irish label would simply be redundant... ?
Then also it can be argued: There's nothing wrong with redundancy, the Irish on it will be appreciated.

It would be understandable in Spain if labels had to be in both Spanish and English, because there's plenty of people who only know one of the aformentioned languages.

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Aonghus
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Posted on Tuesday, December 14, 2004 - 09:05 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Menschenskind, Akidd.
1) Pullover ist im Englischen keine Hose.

http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=pullover

2) Deine Herkunft ist mir Schnurz. Deine Probleme damit genauso. Aber "Tricot" als kleidungstueck ist nun mal nicht Englisch.
http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=tricot
Siehe auch:
http://dict.tu-chemnitz.de/
quote:

Deutsch English

2 Ergebnisse für trikot 2 results for trikot
Trikot (n); Jersey (n) [sport] jersey
Trikot (n); Dress (n) strip [Br]



3) Ich bin in Dublin geboren und aufgewachsen.

Im Uebrigens, "backside" heisst Arsch. Du meinst wahrscheinlich "back" - hinterseite.


(Message edited by aonghus on December 14, 2004)

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Aonghus
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Posted on Tuesday, December 14, 2004 - 09:19 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Excuse my outburst please.

However, it is a bit trying to have people assume malice where none is intended.

Akidd; assume good faith is good advice online.

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Akidd
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Posted on Tuesday, December 14, 2004 - 09:33 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

no its the back side.

tricot seems to be a weaving style, though american, rather than english.

there is a cafe here, the bad ass, but its slang for 'sheep'.

or would you say british, or even british english, or the english of britain? were one sits on.

kleidungsstueck- thats a case for the fire.
problems- a case for the bin/furnace.

i try willingly to ship around such words, as you used them, but you did it... i dislike german, germany, german beer.

one thing: are you guiness or kilkenny (or smithwicks), or made with license from one of these under authority of the first?

at last: loop(forever) is brute force to end a program.. but there are more sophisticated ways to do it.....

just do it then.

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Akidd
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Posted on Tuesday, December 14, 2004 - 09:34 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

as gaeilge: tá sé an fear anseo ag caint..

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Akidd
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Post Number: 66
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Posted on Tuesday, December 14, 2004 - 09:39 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

paíste na lucha francacha sounds more likely to me than 'humanchild' AND NOT 'human child'.

dunno if these both spellings make a different sense for you...let me know...................

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Akidd
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Posted on Tuesday, December 14, 2004 - 09:44 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

dont expect me looking up german slang which i only do understand vague.

not so long ago i were reading about that 95 percent of us should not write any programs at all.

the reason is that they cannot curb their language usage, and tend to integrate indentities into their programs where no identities are at all. programming requires a technically sight of the things.

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Akidd
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Posted on Tuesday, December 14, 2004 - 09:47 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Fear_na_mbróg:

there is a need for me to have labels in irish: for easier learning. and i like it. if we have road names in both languages, we can have more things this way, too, like the warning in the trains.

Aonghus: where about in dublin? and when? why do you have left ireland?

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Akidd
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Posted on Tuesday, December 14, 2004 - 09:52 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

CANT YOU SEE I WANT TO HAVE THE LABELS IN IRISH, NO MATTER WHERE I AM FROM?- there is no relation to the stuff you said, Aonghus.

by the way, 'stuff' is negatively charged.

(Message edited by akidd on December 14, 2004)

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Aonghus
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Posted on Tuesday, December 14, 2004 - 10:00 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I left Ireland, but returned four years ago. I had a job in Germany, now I have one here.

You are butchering Irish syntax, and I'm not about to help you.

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Aonghus
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Posted on Tuesday, December 14, 2004 - 10:07 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

By the way, the picture on the Bad Ass Café is a DONKEY, not a sheep.

Ass is another word (not slang) for a donkey. Of course, it is also slang for a number of vulgar things.

http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=ass

ass1 ( P ) Pronunciation Key (s)
n. pl. ass·es (sz)
Any of several hoofed mammals of the genus Equus, resembling and closely related to the horses but having a smaller build and longer ears, and including the domesticated donkey.
A vain, self-important, silly, or aggressively stupid person.


And Bad Ass is slang for
http://dictionary.reference.com/search?r=2&q=badass
bad·ass ( P ) Pronunciation Key (bds) Vulgar Slang
n.
A mean-tempered or belligerent person.

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Akidd
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Post Number: 70
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Posted on Tuesday, December 14, 2004 - 10:18 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

does it make a difference to the animal lover if it is a sheep or a donkey?

the point was that it not meant 'kick-ass' which means the part one sits on usually, or which is also wiped sometimes, for cleaning purposes. surely there are more 'clinic' definitions. (which are 'clinic')- notice the conscious usage of wrong grammar.

also, especially in german, a case can be clinic.
i told another guy, to look up www.psychologytoday.com , for professional help. this help in form of therapy sessions is to be paid for.

personally, i do not have issues with donkeys, or people fixated to donkeys. and i do not have the time, so get therapy, and learn to talk proper.

in a getto in L.A. you would be as good as dead, man.

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Akidd
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Posted on Tuesday, December 14, 2004 - 10:20 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

so if these people are burried, is anyone understanding THAT I WOULD LIKE TO HAVE LABELS ON ALL PRODUCTS IN IRISH? the rest is OFF-TOPIC.

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Akidd
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Posted on Tuesday, December 14, 2004 - 10:22 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

how amazing (who narrated in which game that way)-
i am butchering irish syntax, and bitting off from something. we are getting closer.

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Aonghus
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Post Number: 616
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Posted on Tuesday, December 14, 2004 - 10:54 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

learn to talk properly

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Pádraig
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Posted on Tuesday, December 14, 2004 - 05:45 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; the courage to change the things I can; and the wisdom to know the difference.

"I were promising me not to reading this thread forever." Chief Joseph.

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Aonghus
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Posted on Wednesday, December 15, 2004 - 04:18 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Go dtuga Dia dom
Foighne chun glacadh leis na rudaí nach dtig liom athrú,
Misneach chun na rudaí a dtig liom athrú, a athrú,
agus an saoícht chun an difear a aithint.

Aiméan, a Phadráig, Aiméan.

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Akidd
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Post Number: 73
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Posted on Thursday, December 16, 2004 - 02:07 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

no its not british, its american english.
as the topic title says: fan amuigh.

please do not reply to my posts in german, or any threatening terms. if you do so in the future, it will be published elsewhere, reported to the authorities, or both things.

futhermore, i consider several individuals here as shine-holy, means having a holy shine. wouldnt you like to read some morale recensions to me?

to be honest, i do not wish these guys to reply anymore. irish papers are using 'bullix', and i shall learn to talk properly.. get your head examined!

this shall be an insider joke, as an abberated guy in a computer game is saying that, in the front room of these two rooms there is an entertainment magazine laying around. the narration is pretty damn good.

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Rebecca (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 213.202.148.199
Posted on Thursday, December 16, 2004 - 02:54 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Akidd,
Just out of curiousity, is English your first language?
I was trying to read this thread but was finding it very difficult to understand.
Can you explain to me what point you're making?

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Pádraig
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Posted on Thursday, December 16, 2004 - 03:04 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

A Rebecca, a chara,

Fáilte go dtí ár teach na ngealt.

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