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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2004 (October-December) » Archive through December 12, 2004 » Phonetic Pronunciation « Previous Next »

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Aland
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Username: Aland

Post Number: 1
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Tuesday, November 30, 2004 - 12:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Will someone please give me the phonetic pronunciation of my favorite single malt: "Knappogue"? Thank you very much.

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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 12.75.181.143
Posted on Tuesday, November 30, 2004 - 06:12 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Knap - nap; ogue rhymes with rogue.

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Jonas
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Username: Jonas

Post Number: 541
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Wednesday, December 01, 2004 - 08:03 am:   Edit Post Print Post

"Knappouge" is the phonetic pronunciation. It's always a bit hard to guess what Irish name lies behind these unintelligble English renderings, but I'm fairly sure the end is "na póige". 'Cnap na póige' could be a guess, though that would be a rather strange name :-)

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 499
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, December 01, 2004 - 11:02 am:   Edit Post Print Post

It is simply "Cnapóg" - lump or hill

Knappogue Castle

(Cnapog - a mound or little hill)
The castle, 5 km southeast of Quin, (originally a MacNamara stronghold built 1467), was restored in the 19th century by Lord Dunboyne. The castle passed to the Land Commission in the late 1920s and was re-sold in 1966. The new owner refurbished the interior in 15th century style. The castle is open to visitors in the daytime and medieval banquets take place at night.

http://www.accommodation-cliffs-of-moher.com/midclare/midclare1.html

(Message edited by aonghus on December 01, 2004)

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Philosophe
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Username: Philosophe

Post Number: 12
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Wednesday, December 01, 2004 - 01:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

In light of new information:
pronunciation

knap-ogue

there isn't really an "u" sound between the k and the n, and i would say the stress of the word is on the second part.
ogue to rhyme with rogue like before

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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 128.240.229.7
Posted on Wednesday, December 08, 2004 - 03:27 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I was just pondering...
cnapóg is a "mound or little hill",
and i remember something about a split in pronunciation into two--> p and c
e.g., One dialect pronounces pinn and one cinn for head..?
well...
could this go someway towards describing why cnapóg isn't cnocóg
--cnoc óg--
which doesn't mean small hill anyway so maybe not...but it kind of does, in that young would imply smallness
is this a bit of a tenuous link?! any ideas
yeah and why didn't the other c get changed to a p you are thinking...maybe the dialect lends itself to changing c to a p so this could be the result with common useage

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 552
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, December 08, 2004 - 03:34 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I think you have mixed up the P and Q branches of Celtic with dialects. (Brythonic (Welsh, Cornish, Breton) vs Goidelic (Irish, Manx, Scots Gaidhlig)) which do have a c->p shift.

Cnap is a lump.

Lots of terms like this get given to landscape features, and the ending -óg need not mean young.

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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 128.240.229.7
Posted on Wednesday, December 08, 2004 - 03:50 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

oh
is cnap mé in aon chor :)



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