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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2004 (October-December) » Archive through November 24, 2004 » Accurate numbers « Previous Next »

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Antaine
Member
Username: Antaine

Post Number: 28
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Friday, November 12, 2004 - 11:55 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

proponents of irish have a tendency to maximize positive margin of error and ignore the negative. detractors of the language would have you believe it's dead and in the ground already. where can i find irish census statistics or an impartial list of number of speakers broken down by year or decade?

the only thing close to that i could find on the net doesn't look promising, but is ten or more years old.

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Kay
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Username: Kay

Post Number: 3
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Saturday, November 13, 2004 - 05:11 am:   Edit Post Print Post

http://www.cso.ie/principalstats/cenir.html
follow this link for the information you need.

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Antaine
Member
Username: Antaine

Post Number: 29
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Saturday, November 13, 2004 - 10:53 am:   Edit Post Print Post

hm...according to this, the number of Irish speakers has doubled since 1926...if that's accurate, how does such a thing escape notice?

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Rebecca (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 195.218.109.151
Posted on Saturday, November 13, 2004 - 12:58 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

This isn't very accurate because the question they ask is whether or not you can speak Irish....it's only recently that they began to ask more detailed questions as to how much irish you can speak. Therefore, unfortunately there's little to compare it with as yet.
As far as I know there are certainly more people who have the ability to speak Irish but less people (in the Gaeltacht for example) who have it as a first language

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Antaine
Member
Username: Antaine

Post Number: 30
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Saturday, November 13, 2004 - 04:21 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

they should ask how many days in a month one goes without speaking english, 1-10, 10-20, or 20-30

or break it down and ask what language one speaks to ones spouse, ones friends, ones children, ones coworkers, and ones customers.

see, they said they initiated a new question for the most recent census, but the numbers all still went up, and it still showed the greatest number of speakers in leinster...

any other place to get recent, fairly unbiased numbers?

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 403
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, November 15, 2004 - 04:53 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Since 1996 they have been asking whether one speaks daily, weekly, rarely or never.

And it is impossible to go without speaking english. Even in the Gaeltacht, you will have to deal with people who speak no Irish. Regrettably, these are often people employed by the State. The Language Act ought to change that.

The population in Dublin (which is in Leinster) has been surging, so it's not surprising that the numbers went up. I don't think the percentage has gone up significantly though.

The only objective numbers I can offer you is that the Audit Bureau of Circulation figures for Foinse (weekly paper) stand at about 5000 copies sold, and Lá has 4004 copies sold daily.

I'm not aware of any surveys.

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 405
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, November 15, 2004 - 09:09 am:   Edit Post Print Post

And here are the TAM Ratings for TG4
http://www.tg4.ie/bearla/scan/scan.htm

These show 40 000 + watchers for programmes in Irish, although they have subtitles in English.

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Ó_diocháin
Member
Username: Ó_diocháin

Post Number: 49
Registered: 09-2004
Posted on Monday, November 15, 2004 - 10:41 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A chairde,
Figures quoted do not include the Six Counties.
The UK census figures for 2001 give the number of (self-reported) Irish speakers there as 167,490 (approximately 10% of the population), of whom 75,125 claimed to be fully fluent in the language.
There is likely some over-reporting here - although UK census figures are notoriously difficult to interpret, particularly with reference to the "traditionally nationalist community", a proportion of whom will, as a matter of principle, refuse to complete a UK census form.
Research carried out on behalf of the Ultach trust (2002) on the demand for local authority services through the medium of Irish, put the figure for fluent Irish speakers at somewhere in excess of 30,000.
In view of the history of migration from Donegal into the Six Counties, the number of pupils/students in gaelscoileana (and the numbers studying Irish elsewhere in the education system) and the pattern of growth in the urban gaeltacht areas in Belfast and Derry, this seems like a not unreasonable figure.
What is without question is that, by all published indicators, interest in the Irish language has increased significantly in the last 15 years in the North, with the number of speakers having grown in that period of time by as much as 30%, according to some indicators.
Slán beo!
Chris



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