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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2004 (October-December) » Archive through November 11, 2004 » Samhain traditions??-Halloween « Previous Next »

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Diarmo
Member
Username: Diarmo

Post Number: 61
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Friday, October 29, 2004 - 04:47 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Anybody know the traditions for Samhain in Ireland before the commercialization brought from the US in the last few years?

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Ó_diocháin
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Username: Ó_diocháin

Post Number: 36
Registered: 09-2004
Posted on Friday, October 29, 2004 - 06:22 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Dhairmo, a chara,
There is a lot of stuff on the web about Celtic traditions and Samhain.
One of the more interesting links that I found was http://www.canadafirst.net/our_heritage/samhain/
Le meas,
Chris

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 347
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Friday, October 29, 2004 - 06:57 am:   Edit Post Print Post

The only one I can think of off hand is blindfolding someone and foretelling what the next year will bring by having them pick one of seven saucers

Water - emigration
Earth - the grave
Rosary Beads - Holy Orders or religious life
Ring - marriage
Bean - riches
Pea - poverty
Stick - don't remember. Something violent.

Lots of apples involved too. Peeling an apple and throwing the peel over your (left) shoulder is alleged to show you the initial of your future spouse.

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Celtoid
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Username: Celtoid

Post Number: 40
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Friday, October 29, 2004 - 08:01 am:   Edit Post Print Post

The Ancient Irish Tales are replete with stories of feasting, beer drinking, games, contests, and midnight excursions that often lead to confrontations with supernatural forces (the fairy mounds of Ireland are always open about Samhain). I also think a lot of the US commercializations are exaggerated versions of ancient Irish customs. We carve Jack O lanterns from big gaudy orange pumpkins instead of turnips!

Oíche Shamhna shona dhuit.

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Paul (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 66.152.218.225
Posted on Friday, October 29, 2004 - 09:47 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A chairde,
I read a book about Irish Halloween traditions: it said it was customary to play tricks/pranks on that night. My favorite one: take somebody's clothes off the clothesline and hang up cabbage leaves in their place!

Paul

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Seán a Chaipín (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 82.69.43.128
Posted on Friday, October 29, 2004 - 12:16 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

In my part of East Mayo in the 1980's we used to go out around the countryside late at night, steal heads of cabbage from the neighbour's fields and kick them all over the road.

In the morning the roads in the village would be covered in mashed raw cabbage. I don't know of any other place where this tradition exists.

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Searlas
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Username: Searlas

Post Number: 16
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Friday, October 29, 2004 - 12:23 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Seán, a similar fate to your cabbage awaits many pumpkins in the US!

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Natalie
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Username: Natalie

Post Number: 46
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Sunday, October 31, 2004 - 04:05 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Here's a question: How do you say "trick or treat" in Irish?

Natalie

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Seán a' Chaipín (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 82.69.43.131
Posted on Monday, November 01, 2004 - 02:12 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I may be wrong, but as far as I know, "Trick or Treat" is not an Irish tradition.

Anyone got any views on this? We certainly sisn't do it in my part of rural Ireland (Mayo).

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Natalie
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Username: Natalie

Post Number: 48
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, November 01, 2004 - 03:18 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

It doesn't really matter, I was just curious because last night was Halloween and I was in a very Halloween-y mood.

Natalie

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P. Brady (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 152.163.100.136
Posted on Monday, November 01, 2004 - 08:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Trick or Treat is a recent "tradition." It was an attempt to channel children from destructive pranks into more peaceful activities. I saw a History Channel presenation last night and I think they said it was early 20th Century.

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Cormac
Member
Username: Cormac

Post Number: 25
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Tuesday, November 02, 2004 - 07:36 am:   Edit Post Print Post

In rural armagh, we used to:
:: remove neighbours gates and hide them for a few days (a strange thing to do, but is apparently a very old tradition)
:: knock doors and run away (no trick or treating tho)
:: carve turnip heads
:: light a bonfire
:: dress up as ghosts, witches etc. and go about the roads scaring people
:: bob for apples in a bowl of water
:: try to bite an apple hanging from a string
:: eat nuts
:: roll nuts with yer nose
:: put coins and rings in apple tarts
:: light sparklers

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Celtoid
Member
Username: Celtoid

Post Number: 42
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Tuesday, November 02, 2004 - 07:42 am:   Edit Post Print Post

"Trick or Treat" is a modern remnant of the old custom of making offerings to spirits (treats) to avoid their wrath (tricks).

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Natalie
Member
Username: Natalie

Post Number: 49
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Tuesday, November 02, 2004 - 06:06 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you everyone for giving into my curiousity. Personally, no one actually says trick or treat here when we go to houses. Its kind of more along the lines of the verb. Like the next day, our teachers always say, did you go trick or treating?

Most tradition here are not really traditions if you don't consider destruction and acts of immaturity, traditions, lol. Our city alone is really bad for doing destructive things. People make large road blocks on the bridges and wait for the police. Then when the police are coming, all the elderly, who are listening to their police scanners, come out the door to tell all the kids who set the bridge road block ablaze that the cops are coming so they can escape. I listened to the radio and the cops said that they were very pleased at how good this year was for all that...they only received 150 calls.

Just out of more curiousity, how many of your guys' places have such things as road blocks (and etc.) on halloween?

Natalie

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pad (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 12.75.254.212
Posted on Tuesday, November 02, 2004 - 10:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Even in big bad New York city I never saw anthing like that. Our Halloween was more like Cormac's - silly pranks - more annoying than damaging. Moving the bus stop signs and the neighbor's trash cans. Sticking pins in doorbells, especially in large apartment houses, so that people had to go down to stop the ringing. The most mischief was throwing eggs and flour -what a mess!

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Natalie
Member
Username: Natalie

Post Number: 50
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, November 03, 2004 - 05:19 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Really? I thought that most places were kind of like that...We're not bad people here or anything, don't think that. I really don't see anything wrong with it though I can see how it might not sound good but I guess, they're just looking fun...whatever turns their crank....

Natalie



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