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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2004 (October-December) » Archive through October 30, 2004 » "Garda force to lose Gaeilge" -SBP Letter « Previous Next »

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Náid (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 62.231.55.170
Posted on Sunday, October 24, 2004 - 11:30 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Garda force to lose Gaeilge
Letter published in The Sunday Business Post:
24/10/04

The recent decision by the Minister for Justice (presumably with cabinet approval) to drop the Irish language requirement for those seeking entry to An Garda Siochána is shallow and without proper examination.

Evidently his aim is to develop the Garda force into a body more reflective ofour new multicultural society.

Surely the lowering of standards is not the way to proceed? Raising standards should be the aim - in this case, the provision of intensive Gaeilge classes for those in need of them.

According to recent media advertisements, French and German are to be taught to Gardai in Templemore. Why not treat Gaeilge similarly? My understanding is that people in this country are entitled under the law to use either English or Gaeilge when dealing with Gardai. Is that going to change now?




I very much welcome the arrival of non-nationals to our shores, and believe that the state should ease their transition difficulties to the greatest extent, but it seems obvious tome that immigrants should make adjustments to suit their new country and its systems, not vice versa.

What will McDowell do if there are objections to wearing seatbelts, to wearing motorbike crash helmets, to driving on the left-hand side of the road? Change the rules to suit the newcomers? A diminution of what we are is not advantageous to anyone.

Brian Mac a' Bhaird, Carraig Mhachaire Rois, Co Mhuineachain

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Fear_na_mbróg
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Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 210
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Tuesday, October 26, 2004 - 06:04 am:   Edit Post Print Post

This is an absolute disgrace!

This is a strong step toward abandoning the language altogether. In Spain, you can talk to the police in Spanish; in France, you can talk to the police in French; in China, you can talk to the police in Chinese.

If they go through with this, it would be appropriate for them to proclaim that the official language of Ireland is English, and that the Irish language has been abandoned.

How can they be doing this, and at the same time be looking for the EU status for the language? If I were the "status-giver" in the EU, I'd reject Irish on the spot if I heard this was going on!

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 338
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Tuesday, October 26, 2004 - 10:46 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Relax.

What the Minister said, in an informal briefing with journalists, was that he was "reviewing" the educational requirements for Irish for entry to the force.

No decision has been taken, or even discussed at government level. McDowell is good at flying kites like this; frequently nothing comes of them.

The Language Act applies to the Gardaí as well; the suggestion of lessons is a good one. After all, a pass in foundation level Irish is unlikely to mean that a member of the Force will actually be able to deal with the public in Irish.

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Fear_na_mbróg
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Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 211
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, October 27, 2004 - 04:39 am:   Edit Post Print Post

As much as I'd like to, I wouldn't be able to converse with the Gardaí in Irish! Sure I'd understand a great deal of it, but there'd be loads of words not in my vocabulary.

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 342
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, October 27, 2004 - 05:42 am:   Edit Post Print Post

And neither would many Gardaí, at least around Dublin.

But when did you last need to speak to a Garda? I can't remember when I last spoke to one officially. (And I intend to keep it that way!)

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Fear_na_mbróg
Member
Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 213
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, October 27, 2004 - 05:49 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Well I tend to go for the odd drive without insurance... it's only a matter of time before I get pulled over... I wonder - if I can speak Irish but they can't, are they allowed to arrest me? hmm...

Ehh... d'fhág mé mo pháipéir aránachais sa bhaile. Dá mba mhaith leat, b'fhéidir liom tiomáint ar ais go dtí an teach anois díreach agus iad a fháil? Nó tabharfaidh mé isteach sa stáisiúin iad níos déanaí anocht?

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 344
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, October 27, 2004 - 09:11 am:   Edit Post Print Post

It would likely backfire as they would correctly assume you were being a smart ass.

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Fear_na_mbróg
Member
Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 220
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, October 27, 2004 - 09:58 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Ach... an mbeadh fhios acu an Ghaeilge ar "smart ass"? Sin an cheist!

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Lúcas
Member
Username: Lúcas

Post Number: 29
Registered: 01-2004


Posted on Wednesday, October 27, 2004 - 12:25 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Is 'cílí' 'smart ass' de réir English - Irish Slang Dictionary le Gearóid Mac an Bhainisteora.

Mise le meas,

Lúcas



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