mainoff.gif
lastdyoff.gif
lastwkoff.gif
treeoff.gif
searchoff.gif
helpoff.gif
contactoff.gif
creditsoff.gif
homeoff.gif


The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2004 (October-December) » Archive through October 13, 2004 » Help with translation please « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tis_herself
Member
Username: Tis_herself

Post Number: 1
Registered: 09-2004
Posted on Sunday, September 19, 2004 - 02:34 am:   Edit Post Print Post

ni feidir an duba cur ina ban air...

Thanks for your help

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Fear_na_mbróg
Member
Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 132
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Sunday, September 19, 2004 - 05:32 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I'd say that's supposed to be:

Ní féidir an dubh cur ina bhán air...

Which literaly means:

The black can't be made white on it


Which probably means:

The situation cannot be rectified.
What's done is done.
It can't be repaired.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 148
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, September 20, 2004 - 05:58 am:   Edit Post Print Post

No. It means you cannot fool him. You cannot make him believe what is black is white.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Fear_na_mbróg
Member
Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 134
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, September 20, 2004 - 06:03 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Idioms, idioms, idioms...

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 149
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, September 20, 2004 - 06:04 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Éist! (anois, más ag lorg débhrí atáir, sinn ceann breá dhuit)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Cait
Member
Username: Cait

Post Number: 6
Registered: 09-2004
Posted on Monday, September 20, 2004 - 06:33 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

perhaps it means that it cannot be changed from white to black or black to white...perhaps it means what the speaker want's it to mean...

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

UMG (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 220.233.19.174
Posted on Monday, September 20, 2004 - 08:50 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

That's true, but it's means "he can't be fooled" in general. "translate" comes from the latin "trans latum". "Trans" means across and "latum" comes from the verb "to carry" (fero, ferri, tuli, latum) - in the same way, "trans-fer" comes from both parts and the word "ferry" comes from the "to carry" part only.

Its sense has been misinterpreted to means "give as close as possible a word for word replacement" which of course yields nonsense for one trying to carry across the meaning of a sentence. This latter description is what I take translate to mean.

So, while a word for word replacement works for single words like "dork", it doesn't really work for multiple words strung together.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 156
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Tuesday, September 21, 2004 - 04:26 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Cáit, even if you translated it word for word, you could not get you meaning from it, because of the "air"

And understanding is in the ear of the hearer, not the mouth of the speaker!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Fear_na_mbróg
Member
Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 138
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Tuesday, September 21, 2004 - 05:42 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Sure prepositions can't be translate at all!

D'fhan mé ann le huair.

"le" means "with".

So you could say that means:

I stayed there with an hour.

When in actual fact it means:

I stayed there for an hour.

or

I waited for an hour.

But at the same time you can't say that you wait "with" time in Irish, because to us as Gaeilge, we're just waiting for an hour.

Prepositions can't be captured and translated.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

UMG (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 220.233.19.174
Posted on Tuesday, September 21, 2004 - 07:36 am:   Edit Post Print Post

people in cork and kerry country areas sometimes in response to the question "How long have you lived here?" will reply with "I'm here with years" - "Ta'im anso le blianta", a legacy of the recent usage of the Irish there. This goes to show that word for word translations can change without affecting the meaning.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Cait
Member
Username: Cait

Post Number: 9
Registered: 09-2004


Posted on Tuesday, September 21, 2004 - 11:59 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Well, if there are sentences following that one, they may help clarify it anyway.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tis_herself
Member
Username: Tis_herself

Post Number: 2
Registered: 09-2004
Posted on Tuesday, September 21, 2004 - 10:04 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thanks to you all for your help...I think maybe the writer is referring to Guinness ?? lol

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Pádraig
Member
Username: Pádraig

Post Number: 23
Registered: 09-2004
Posted on Tuesday, September 21, 2004 - 11:30 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

He is at the market in town with a pain in the neck.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 164
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, September 22, 2004 - 04:35 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Guinness have used the saying as a slogan for a long time, slightly twisting its meaning. They mean you cannot be fooled by any other beer pretending to be Guinness.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Antóin (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 159.134.181.157
Posted on Saturday, September 25, 2004 - 05:58 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Just in case you're all getting a little confused at this stage and can't tell black from white, I refer to the original question.

I agree with Aonghus, the phrase is widely understood in Irish to mean 'you can't fool someone'

I don't think it really helps to be over-analysing common phrases and proverbs, they often use imagery that can't be explained by standard grammer.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ken (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 203.197.237.225
Posted on Wednesday, September 29, 2004 - 04:22 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Can anybody help me with some specific translation?
or with the use of common sentences...

Sorry m a new user

abey999mickey@yahoo.com

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 205
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, September 29, 2004 - 04:44 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Ken

you might try either posting the sentences here, or join the GAEILGE-B e-mail list which is for learners.

send an e-mail to listserv@listserv.heanet.ie

with "SUBSCRIBE GAEILGE-B your name" as the body of the message.



©Daltaí na Gaeilge