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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2004 (July-September) » Archive through August 22, 2004 » Pronunciation of Ui Laoighis, Ui Bairrche, Ui Cinnsealaigh « Previous Next »

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O Deorain (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 216.232.36.44
Posted on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 06:09 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I'm doing a little geneological research and would like to know how to pronounce these words.

Ui Laoighis
Ui Bairrche
Ui Cinnsealaigh

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Maidhc Ó G. (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 65.54.98.106
Posted on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 11:50 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

WEE LWEE - YISH
WEE BAHR - KHUH
WEE KIN - SH@ - LUH

That's how I'd say them.

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Jonas
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Username: Jonas

Post Number: 7
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 02:53 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Once again it is painstickingly clear that Irish pronunciation cannot be expressed by trying to write it in English. I don't think I've ever seen anyone succeed in giving an English spelling for Irish pronunciation...

O Deorain, in order to get the pronunciation it would be helpful if you would tell us which pronunciation you want. Munster, Connacht or Ulster. Since it's a geneological research I guess you're interested in one particular area and would want the pronuncation of that area.

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O Deorain (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 216.232.36.44
Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 06:09 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Well, the places I mentioned are areas in present day Co. Carlow and Co. Laois mostly...if that helps...

I had read that Ui Cinnsealaigh = Hy-Kinsella
but I want to get second opinions which is why I posted here...

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 11
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 07:54 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Hy- is how Uí (or Uibh) was usually Englished when Placenames are involved. But sometimes the Uí gets swallowed up.

examples: Iveragh -> Uibh Rathach (in Kerry)

There were a lot of placenames where the name derived from the dominant local family, in this case the Kinsellas.

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O Deorain (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 216.232.36.44
Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 07:58 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I had read that the pronunciation of Ui Cinnsealaigh was like Hi-Kinsella...not the spelling.... I may be confused now...

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Jonas
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Username: Jonas

Post Number: 370
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, August 11, 2004 - 03:45 am:   Edit Post Print Post

No, the pronunciation of Uí Cinnsealaigh is definitely not like Hi-Kinsella. In IPA it would be [i: k´i:n´s´@lig´]

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O Deorain (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 216.232.36.44
Posted on Wednesday, August 11, 2004 - 04:10 am:   Edit Post Print Post

You'll have to forgive me but I have no idea what IPA or [i: k´i:n´s´@lig´] is.

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Jonas
Member
Username: Jonas

Post Number: 372
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, August 11, 2004 - 04:27 am:   Edit Post Print Post

No problem.
IPA = Internation Phonetic Alphabet. It is used to give the exact pronunciation of every language there is. Obviously, no-one could ever master the pronunciation rules for every single language, so the IPA is used when explaining the pronunciation. Once you know it - and the person who explains to you knows it - you can get the pronunciation right.

I'm always saying that the first thing one should learn (in terms of languages) is the IPA. There are very few languages that can be represented by English spelling. Irish most certainly cannot. There are too many sounds in Irish simply not found in English.



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