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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2004 (July-September) » Archive through August 22, 2004 » Do any English language words have their origin in the Irish language? « Previous Next »

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Fíona
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Username: Fíona

Post Number: 1
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 08:38 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Do any English language words have their origin in the Irish language?

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Jonas
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Username: Jonas

Post Number: 3
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 09:17 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Some do, yes. Quite a few if you consider clothes typical to Ireland/Scotland. (Regarding the origins of words in English it makes sense to threat Irish and Scottish Gaelic in common).

Some are obvious, such as "whisk(e)y" or "Uileann pipes", others include "slogan" and "galore". There are quite a lot so I cannot start to mention all.

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Fíona
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Username: Fíona

Post Number: 2
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 11:53 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Do you know of a book or website that I could look at to find out more about this topic?

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Tomás (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 198.22.236.230
Posted on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 12:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Shanty - from "sean tí" = old house
slew (as in crowd) - from "slua" = crowd
longshoreman - from "loingseoir" = boatman
smithereens - from "smidiríní" = little bits
kibosh = from "cap báis" = death cap (a hood put over the head and face of the dead back in the day.

These are just a few off the top of my head. Check the archives for others. From time to time this question comes up on this site.

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 8
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 04:13 am:   Edit Post Print Post

There are several books by Diarmuid Ó Muirthile dealing specifically with "Hiberno English" i.e. English as it's spoken in Ireland.

But I don't know of any website or book dealing with Irish words in American or British English.

Have you tried to google?

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OCG (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 82.69.43.128
Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 10:55 am:   Edit Post Print Post

The origin of words like "shanty" and "longshoreman" are disputed.

"Trousers" comes from Early Modern Irish "triubhas".

Shebeen comes from síbín...

There's a widely used food additive called Carrageenan , comes from carraigín.

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Rómán (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 213.197.173.4
Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 11:49 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Ná fuil an focal "sport" of Irish origin? In Irish it means "fun" or smth...

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OCG (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 82.69.43.131
Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 08:24 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I tihnk "sport" is a loanword from English.

There is however the Ebglish word "spree" from the Irish "spraoi".

There are examples "galore".

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Cáit (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 195.93.33.11
Posted on Friday, August 13, 2004 - 04:13 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

There are numerous placenames that have been anglicised- infact any place here in Ireland has derrived from the Irish language.There is one place called "man of war" which does'nt actually mean what you think. it comes from "mean o bhothar"- middle of the road. One word that the English are now using more and more especially in the media, is craic. One other word is brogues- shoes from brogai.

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Tomás (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 198.22.236.230
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 09:03 am:   Edit Post Print Post

OCG, -- The word "longshoreman" and "shanty" are only disputed by OED lexicographers probably long dead by now. For whatever the reason -- politics, prejudice, they were a might stingy in attributing any English word to either Old Irish or Modern Irish.

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Diarmo
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Username: Diarmo

Post Number: 5
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 10:28 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Cait,
the word craic actually comes Scots I'm afraid! It is a myth that it is an Irish word! Ta bron orm e a ra! I never heard the one about Man of War before!

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Gearóid Ó Ceallaigh (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 24.188.115.178
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 12:16 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Is féidir libh dul go dtí an dá shuíomh seo chun clár fada agus a bhfoghraíocht a fháil: / You can go to these two sites to get a long list and their pronunciation:

http://nagaeilmagazine.com/pronunciation/irishwordsinenglish.htm http://nagaeilmagazine.com/pronunciation/introduction.htm

- Gearóid



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