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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2004 (July-September) » Archive through July 15, 2004 » For fun and curiousity, what inspired everyone here to learn Irish? « Previous Next »

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Nina (68.89.228.184 - 68.89.228.184)
Posted on Saturday, July 10, 2004 - 01:03 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Hey everyone:-)
I just thought I'd start something for my own curiousity, and perhaps to inspire others, just why everyone here chose to learn Irish instead of another language as obviously by choosing to learn Irish you're choosing it over something else including another language.

I myself only more recently found out Ireland even had its own language and thanks to "How the Irish Saved Civilization" and a friend with living relatives in Ireland I find myself now typing this post.

I get passionate easy, but NEVER, I repeat hardly ever do I STAY passionate about something as I have language. I have been passionate about Spanish now for three years and studied almost everyday especially when I had to learn a year's worth on my own and I have now added to my list of passionate study Irish as my next log to try an quelch the flames. I got attracted to the culture and the literary tradition(I LOVE to read.) and even just the sound of it itself. There's some unexpainable sásta from just saying Irish words in a complete aesthetic sense. I'm a bit tired now for me to heat up too much but I have every intention of going all the way. I am but a mere 19 now and I have no illusions of being fluent in one year. Heck, I've been studying Spanish for three years and even starting this year to study over the summer I'm only a begginer-intermediate speaker and what is it 10,000(of course who decides where the line is?)words to be considered fluent? I just love all these little things now that I've started to learn Irish I've become even more under its beautiful spell.:-) Well, I guess I'll shut up now and may Irish live on for eons to come!

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Betty OBrien (213.235.176.230 - 213.235.176.230)
Posted on Saturday, July 10, 2004 - 06:21 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Dia dhaoibh!
I started learning Irish just about one year ago, but the most passionate study began last Christmas. I was able to learn 200 words in two days, but I am more and more lazy, now. My family & friends say I am crazy because once I was learning 5 foreign languages at one time (English, French, Irish, Welsh, Latin). Now, I want to leave Welsh and Latin for later times, although I know it's a pity.

Why Irish? That's easy: I believe I bave the Irish blood, although my whole family lives (and always lived) in Bohemia(That's an old Celtic country which is, unfortunately, full of Slavs). My Bohemian family tree begins in 1608 which is a big sign because it is the year of establishing the licence of Bushmills Malt. Also many members of my family have the blood group 0 which is very typical for the western part of Ireland. I took the name "O'Brien" as myself because my friends call me so. This nick was given to me when a friend of me said:"You look like Brian Boru." Other friend said:"I don't think so, she looks more like Brian Boru's wolfhound." A next person said:"Hm, more like Brian Boru's wolf." That's why I am called O'Brien or Mac Tíre Boru. I don't understand why do I look like Brian Boru or his pets, but that's what my friends said. (One small note: My friends were very sober that time.)

I should stop my egoistic speeches now. Well, my family is very angry on me because I told them I want to be a poor Irish teacher and die tired in poverty somewhere in Connemara. They all want me to be a scientist, doctor, lawyer etc.
Irish is very similar to my native language(Czech). That's why it's very easy for me to learn a Celtic language when all the grammar is more or less made by the same principes.

I LOVE the sound of Irish. Mostly "CH", "S+a narrow vowel" and a syllable making "R"(for example: GORM, ORM...)

Go n-éirí an bóthar leat! (That's my favourite phrase, guess what does it mean :-) )

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Nina (66.139.109.138 - 66.139.109.138)
Posted on Saturday, July 10, 2004 - 08:48 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

OOps!:-O Looks like there's already a forum for this! I guess I'll know next time to look before I type.
I myself can't claim a drop of Irish blood but I can claim a love of the way Irish sounds; it's just so beautiful! I especially love the way Irish sounds and love listening to Enya sing it. Your English is very good;it must be so cool to already know two languages! I know an amazing(drumroll Más é do thoil é).....one! But only for now and being mulitlingual is something I'm working hard to achieve. By the way, is the phrase something to do with the road rising with you??

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Betty OBrien (213.235.176.230 - 213.235.176.230)
Posted on Sunday, July 11, 2004 - 05:01 am:   Edit Post Print Post

That's right, it means something like "May the road rise and meet with you", but it's shortened. It's an old Irish wish of success. I found it very interesting, because Irish "Good luck" is made of that sentence, so it was shortened twice.

By the way: Do you want to read a newspaper in Irish? Go to www.beo.ie It's a good fun.

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Fear na mBróg (213.94.241.133 - 213.94.241.133)
Posted on Sunday, July 11, 2004 - 07:31 am:   Edit Post Print Post

If

"Go n-éirí an bóthar leat" means "May the road rise to meet you", then "Is buachaill mé" means "Chocolate is brown".

D'éirigh mé amach as an leaba.
I rose out of bed.

D'éirigh liom sa scrúdú.
I succeeded in the exam.

"Go n-éirí an bóthar leat", I would translate as "May you succeed on your path".

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Alex (64.12.116.136 - 64.12.116.136)
Posted on Monday, July 12, 2004 - 12:32 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Fear,shouldn't that be "D'fhéirigh"? I am not very far but recall something about a lenited f?

Also Nina how long have you been into learning languages? I always have, I am 14 now and study Irish and spanish, I would love to learn so much more and dabble when I can

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Monday, July 12, 2004 - 07:12 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Dobry Den, Betty

Be careful of word for word translations!

If you look up the word "éirí" in a good Irish dictionary, you will find it covers almost a page.

Literal word for word translations can make the language look picturesque, but are very misleading (and generally annoying to some Irish speakers, myself included).

Thus,

Go n-éirí an bóthar leat means "May you have a successful journey". and not "May the place where two cows can pass each other rise up with you"

and

Go n-éirí leat - means "May you have success"

ne sledanou



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