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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2004 (July-September) » Archive through July 15, 2004 » ?!3 Irish words = 1 English word?! differentiation help « Previous Next »

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Nina (68.92.123.111 - 68.92.123.111)
Posted on Sunday, July 04, 2004 - 08:34 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi there everyone!
I'm still rather new to Irish and only in the second lesson in Learning Irish I'm given three words all meaning there.:-& I know in a vague sense "ann" is used when there is no adjective and someting else(I don't have my materials with me;ansin is used more for the oppisite of here, and ansiúd is used for a more distant there but I don't feel the book went into enough depth for me to know when to use what and was hoping maybe on of you could give more comprehensive explanations or examples. I'd really appreciate it. Go raibh maith agat!

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Robin (66.87.137.230 - 66.87.137.230)
Posted on Monday, July 05, 2004 - 12:39 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I think I understand this --

ansin means "over there, in that location". In English, "there is a pen (over) there", or "the doctor is there (across the room)"

ansiúd means there in the sense of distance or something not visible, you're not explaining exactly where something is, but that there is one somewhere else. "There is a doctor there (at the clinic)"

ann is used only when you need to imply 'there', but the sentence doesn't actually have a specific location in mind. Something exists, but you don't need to specify exactly where it is, just that that it 'is'. I think of it as akin to 'exists in this/that place/time' (which sounds a wee bit star-trekish), but I seem to be using it properly, if the texts and Nancy Stenson's workbook are any guide.

BTW, Nina, I am just starting as well -- and I'm looking for someone to trade emails with to test out my teensy bit of Gaeilge. Everyone on the forum here has been very helpful, but I hate to keep bothering them with little questions that I'm sure have been addressed umpteen times! The SEARCH function on the left has been very useful, too.

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Fear na mBróg (213.94.243.134 - 213.94.243.134)
Posted on Monday, July 05, 2004 - 07:33 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I for one amn't bothered by little questions. Yours are pretty logical and educated and I don't mind spreading the knowledge!

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Robin (66.87.137.230 - 66.87.137.230)
Posted on Monday, July 05, 2004 - 12:31 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you, Fear na mBróg. You've been tremendously helpful! I just feel rather...inadequate sometimes. I'm not yet comfortable making my own sentences yet...I have words, and some rules, but the comfort level isn't quite there.

You all have been patient and most informative!
Go raibh maith agaibh!

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Arabian Knight (213.94.237.253 - 213.94.237.253)
Posted on Monday, July 05, 2004 - 12:50 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Ultimately, we are all learners. No one knows everything; we all know a little about something.

Nina: a couple of pointers -

Bhí mé ann = I was there (some understood place).

Bhí sí ann = She was there (etc., etc.).


Tá sé ansin = It is there
(pointing to nearby location).
(sé = it or he, depending)

The following phrase may be new to you in its use of "ann";
"ann" in this phrase can be used as meaning
"to be capable of doing something" =

Tá mé "in ann" é a dhéanamh = I am able to do it.
Tá sí "in ann" etc., etc.

"in ann" = ábalta = able.


Robin has given you good examples. Keep up the good work.

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Nina (68.90.145.8 - 68.90.145.8)
Posted on Friday, July 09, 2004 - 07:06 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Go raibh maith everyone for everyone's help and not getting impatient or be even willing to answer questions such as these like people do here! It's very nice to have people on the net to answer questions like this when they come up and sure all the beginners anseo really appreciate it!

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Betty OBrien (213.235.176.230 - 213.235.176.230)
Posted on Saturday, July 10, 2004 - 06:33 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Dia dhaoibh!
Can anybody help me with the preposition "sa"? I know it causes eclipsis but I saw something like "sa ghloine". Are there any rules about when it can cause lenition, too? My frend-a native speaker was not able to answer, 'cause he has never been learning the grammar.

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Fear na mBróg (213.94.240.53 - 213.94.240.53)
Posted on Saturday, July 10, 2004 - 08:54 am:   Edit Post Print Post

i (Gaeilge) = in (English)

i + an (becomes) sa, or "ins an".

Bhí sé sa charr. (séimhiú)
Bhí sé ins an gcarr. (urú)


Consider how some people say:

It was proved

while others say:

It was proven


Well, most people (including mise) say:

ar an mbord
ar an iasc
sa phobal
san fhuinneog
san arán


But in Ulster, they'll say:

ar an bhord
ar an iasc
sa bpobal
sa bhfuinneog
sa n-arán


They turn the rules upside down:

den charr -> den gcarr
don charr -> don gcarr
sa charr -> sa gcarr

ar an mbord -> ar an bhord
faoin mbord -> faoin bhord
leis an mbord -> leis an bhord

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Betty OBrien (213.235.176.230 - 213.235.176.230)
Posted on Saturday, July 10, 2004 - 11:44 am:   Edit Post Print Post

What's the verbal noun of "lonraigh" and "séid"? I promise you another poem if somebody would answer me.

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Fear na mBróg (213.94.240.53 - 213.94.240.53)
Posted on Saturday, July 10, 2004 - 01:30 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

lonrú
séideadh

Go to An Foclóir Beag and type in a verb, it'll give you the verbal noun then.



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