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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2004 (April-June) » Translation help « Previous Next »

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Doreen (198.81.26.45 - 198.81.26.45)
Posted on Wednesday, June 02, 2004 - 06:13 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A chara:
How would I best say, 'The Return of the Raven'?
(I am trying to express the idea that the raven first sent forth from the ark has returned, yet as a title it needs to be as concise as possible)

Le Meas,
Doreen

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Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.104 - 193.1.100.104)
Posted on Thursday, June 03, 2004 - 03:45 am:   Edit Post Print Post

'Filleadh an Fhiaigh' is now the standard.

'Filleadh an Fhéich' I consider to be less plastic:

'Bhraith mé ar ghuth an fhéich,
an lá sin do thriall sibh ón ndún,
nár chomhartha maith a casadh chughainn.'

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Debra Closser (64.12.116.136 - 64.12.116.136)
Posted on Thursday, June 03, 2004 - 02:44 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hello,

I just stumbled onto this site and was wondering if the Munster, Connacht or Ulster is spoken here or if all three are used? I am trying to learn to speak the Ulster dialect, but I'm not having much luck with finding others who are also learning to speak it. So I thought I would just drop in and see if there were any others who were trying to learn that dialect also.

Slán!

Deb

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Ed (24.185.210.123 - 24.185.210.123)
Posted on Thursday, June 03, 2004 - 04:00 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I thought Noah sent out a dove.

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Chris Dixon (194.247.95.130 - 194.247.95.130)
Posted on Friday, June 04, 2004 - 05:19 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi Debra,
There are speakers of all of the three major dialects represented here on these boards.
Probably the most readily available self-study course for Ulster Irish is Irish On Your Own by Éamann Ó Donaill.
There is a (recently out of print) BBC NI course called Now You're Talking, which is pretty good and which you might well still pick up in a bookshop in Britain or Ireland.
There are two short audio courses, Giota beag and Giota beag éile, which can be accessed free of charge from the BBC NI website.
I don't know if you are already familiar with any of these, but hope this information is helpful to you.
Le gach dea-ghuí!

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Pádraig (65.45.166.146 - 65.45.166.146)
Posted on Friday, June 04, 2004 - 07:05 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Debra, a chara,

http://www.bbc.co.uk/northernireland/blas/learners/beag1.shtml

Here's the link to Giota Beag. This is a real fun site, and the moderator speaks with a rich, Ulster accent. In fact, it's so rich that at first I had a hard time distinguishing his English from his Irish. Needless to say, since the program is produced out of Belfast, you'll get plenty of exposure to Ulster.

Go mbeannai Dia thu,
Pádaigh

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Debra Closser (64.12.116.136 - 64.12.116.136)
Posted on Friday, June 04, 2004 - 08:26 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hello arís!

I was having a little trouble figuring out how this thing works..so I posted the same question twice. Sorry...agus go raibh maith agaibh for your help and direction to the Ulster dialect.
Wish me luck as I do all of you who are learning whatever form of Irish.

Go raibh maith agaibh arís agus slán,

Deb

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Eibhlín Mc Díormeada De Paor (80.6.55.118 - 80.6.55.118)
Posted on Saturday, June 05, 2004 - 08:53 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Filleadh an Fhiaigh
cheapím

slán
Eibhlín

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Fear na mBróg (213.94.241.126 - 213.94.241.126)
Posted on Saturday, June 05, 2004 - 09:48 am:   Edit Post Print Post

The difference between "féich" and "fiaigh" isn't that important. It's like some people say "burned", others say "burnt", some lay "lighted", others say "lit". Most commonly probably, some say "spelled", others say "spelt". Neither are wrong, just a little different.

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Dori (198.81.26.45 - 198.81.26.45)
Posted on Saturday, June 12, 2004 - 05:48 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you for the responses re: Filleadh an Fhiaigh. And, Ed, yes Noah did send out a dove after he first sent out the raven which did not return. Jewish folklore has a story about why the raven did not return (being a carrion bird, it was too involved with the...uh...corpses floating on the water); Native American tales tell of the raven creating dry land. I am writing a story about another possibility which links Jewish and Irish mythology.
Dori

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Dori (198.81.26.45 - 198.81.26.45)
Posted on Saturday, June 12, 2004 - 05:51 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you for the responses re: Filleadh an Fhiaigh. And, Ed, yes Noah did send out a dove after he first sent out the raven which did not return. Jewish folklore has a story about why the raven did not return (being a carrion bird, it was too involved with the...uh...corpses floating on the water); Native American tales tell of the raven creating dry land. I am writing a story about another possibility which links Jewish and Irish mythology.
Dori

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OCG (82.69.43.174 - 82.69.43.174)
Posted on Saturday, June 12, 2004 - 08:48 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Ádh mór ort Debra. (best of luck).

Keep in touch!! If you have any questions just ask...

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