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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2004 (April-June) » Ceist eile.......... « Previous Next »

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Celtoid (64.12.116.136 - 64.12.116.136)
Posted on Thursday, April 22, 2004 - 08:38 am:   Edit Post Print Post

ar "Tnúthán an Dúchais" arís! "Pé acu sin é, bhí sé de rún aige cúitiú a dhéanamh sa gcreagaireacht ach a dtéadh sé go Seana Choille." Why is "téadh" eclipsed?!

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Thursday, April 22, 2004 - 09:25 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Ah, now you have me. I'd say "Because it wouldn't sound right otherwise" - ach ní haon cabhair é sin!

This site (in German) http://www.braesicke.de/verb1.htm
says that the participle "ach a" causes eclipse.

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Fear na mBróg (159.134.100.26 - 159.134.100.26)
Posted on Thursday, April 22, 2004 - 10:19 am:   Edit Post Print Post

go dtéadh -> a dtéadh

'Sé sin go bhfeiceann sé
'Sé sin a bhfeiceann sé


Not much of an abbreviation, but still, an abbreviation!

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Thursday, April 22, 2004 - 12:09 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

no. "ach a" is a participle in it's own right.

It means "when"

Beadh cupán caife agam ach a bhfuil an baile sroichte agam.

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Fear na mBróg (159.134.100.26 - 159.134.100.26)
Posted on Thursday, April 22, 2004 - 12:18 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

While we're on the subject

(Ach a bhfuil muid ar an ábhar!)

How the hell does "agus" work?! Eg.

Gheobhaidh mé í agus í sa bhaile.

What exactly does that mean:

I'll get it when it's at home?
I'll get it if it's at home?


...and don't say "both", because they do have different meanings. eg.

I'll buy that book when I have the money.
I'll buy that book if I have the money.

Ceannóidh mé an leabhar sin agus an t-airgead agam.

The 2 sentences are clearly different. The 1st one is expressing that even if he doesn't have the money right now to buy it, he definitely will buy it when he does have the money. The 2nd is saying for instance, if he's in the bookshop right now and he has a couple of € on him, then he'll buy the book, but if he doesn't, he's not going to go all the way back to his apartment to get the dosh and come back! He's saying "if", not "when"!!

One usage I've seen of it before is on Bus Átha Cliath. It says this:

Agus an tiománaí ag tiomáint, ná labhair leis nó cuir isteach air...


Well, anyone?

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Thursday, April 22, 2004 - 12:30 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

In the last usage, I'd translate agus as "while".

I'm doubtful of your other examples - I wouldn't use "agus" that way.

ceannóidh mé an leabhar nuair a bhíonn an t-airgead agam.

ceannóidh mé an leabhar má tá an t-airgead agam.

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Celtoid (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Friday, April 23, 2004 - 08:43 am:   Edit Post Print Post

((("ach a" is a participle in it's own right.))))------------------------------------------------------------Sin é ar shíl(?) mé, ach ní raibh mé cinnte. Go raibh maith agaibh arís, a chairde.

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Friday, April 23, 2004 - 09:35 am:   Edit Post Print Post

(Sin a shíl mé)

Failte romhat

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