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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2004 (April-June) » Struggling with a phrase, help! « Previous Next »

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Rómán (81.7.96.96 - 81.7.96.96)
Posted on Thursday, April 08, 2004 - 05:09 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A chairde,

I have come across a sentence in my book in which I understand every word but still I don't see the logic behind it. The sentence is "An bhfuil an dinnéar ullamh fós?". How can smth be "still ready" as opposed to "already ready"??? Anyone any ideas? Or it is just a lexical mistake in the book?

Buíochas in advance

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Mary (24.185.210.123 - 24.185.210.123)
Posted on Thursday, April 08, 2004 - 05:26 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

fós = yet in that sentence. Is the dinner ready yet?

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Rómán (81.7.96.96 - 81.7.96.96)
Posted on Thursday, April 08, 2004 - 06:08 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Máire, a chara

Go raibh maith agat, that was my guess too, but what about "cheana féin"? Is it a synonim of "fós"? And what about a sentence "An bhfuil sí bán fós?" - how can you know if she is still or already blond (if someone is dying her hair regularly)?

Buíochas in advance

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Celtoid (64.12.116.136 - 64.12.116.136)
Posted on Thursday, April 08, 2004 - 10:11 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I'd like to know when one uses "fós" (yet, still), "go fóill" (yet), or "i gcónaí" (always, still)?!

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Fear na mBróg (159.134.101.239 - 159.134.101.239)
Posted on Friday, April 09, 2004 - 02:31 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá sé sa leaba fós. He's still in bed

Níl sé as an leaba fós. He isn't out of bed yet.


Táim go fóill i nGailimh. I'm still in Galway.


Bíonn daoine i gcónaí ag magadh faoin bhfear sin. People are always mocking that man.

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mise (128.240.229.7 - 128.240.229.7)
Posted on Monday, April 26, 2004 - 04:06 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I'm not a hundred percent but if you look at it logically "i gconaí" really means "habitually". I don't know if that'll help you to remember how to distiguish them any better. Anyway, that's only an observation I made...!
x

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2004 - 04:20 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Fós carries the meaning "not yet, but will be soon"

i gconaí can be used to mean "still" in the sense of "are you still doing x", meaning that you will probably also continue doing it, although it is more commonly used for "always"

go fóill is the closest to "vanilla" still

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Celtoid (205.188.116.136 - 205.188.116.136)
Posted on Wednesday, April 28, 2004 - 11:23 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Sin é a cheap mé, a Aonghuis. Go raibh maith agat arís. Ach cad faoi "Tá sneachta fós ar na sléibhte."? And can you answer Rómán's question? What's the difference between "Is she blond yet?" and "Is she yet(still) blond?" as Gaelige? I was thinking that this is where the difference between "i gconaí" and "fós/go fóill" might prove useful. "An bhfuil sí bán i gconaí?" (Is she still blond?" and "An bhfuil sí bán fós?" (Is she blond yet?) Does word order have anything to to with it, as it does in English: "An bhfuil sí bán fós?" (Is she blond yet?) as opposed to "An bhfuil sí fós bán?" (Is she yet blond?). Cad a cheapann tú?

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Ellen (24.185.210.123 - 24.185.210.123)
Posted on Wednesday, April 28, 2004 - 04:25 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Ok, Cónas a déarfá "anymore."

You don't send me flowers anymore.
He doesn't come here anymore.

Hmmmmm?

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Thursday, April 29, 2004 - 04:19 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I didn't see Rómán's question - I'm lazy and skip some long posts. Also, I was on vacation around easter.

I'd say

An bhfuil sí fionn fós? - Is she blond yet?
An bhfuil sí fós fionn? - Is she still blond?

So it's word order. But you could use "i gconaí" in the second case and it would be unambiguous

An bhfuil sí fionn i gcaonaí.

As for anymore - "a thuilleadh" or "níos mó"

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Friday, April 30, 2004 - 04:41 am:   Edit Post Print Post

You could also say "Nach bhfuil sí fionn fós?" which would mean "Isn't she blond yet?"

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Friday, April 30, 2004 - 04:43 am:   Edit Post Print Post

btw: cheana féin = already

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Fear na mBróg (159.134.101.213 - 159.134.101.213)
Posted on Friday, April 30, 2004 - 06:33 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Watching Ros na Rún today, I heard the following:

'Bhfuil 'fhios aige fós?

I looked at the subtitles and they read:

Doe he know yet?


I wonder how one would say "Does he still know?": "' Bhfuil 'fhios aige go fóill" b'fhéidir?

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Friday, April 30, 2004 - 07:54 am:   Edit Post Print Post

"Bhfuil 'fhios aige go fóill" is still ambiguous. Usually the context will make it clear.

However, since when one wants to use the sense "still" it's usually a concrete piece of knowledge that is being talked about.

So I'd say "An bhfuil sé fós ar an eolas faoi sin?" - Does he still know that?

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