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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2004 (January-March) » Translation assistance please « Previous Next »

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maureen (65.168.224.161 - 65.168.224.161)
Posted on Saturday, March 06, 2004 - 10:45 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I am a nursing student. I live in a small town in Ohio. No person in this area can speak the Irish Language except for my nursing instructor. I was given the assignment to translate six words or phraes for extra points.

1. Alainn
2. Ta tart orm
3. Gaeilge
4. Ta mo bhriste tri thine
5. Nil fhios agama
6. Mise, le meas

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Antaine (141.153.164.30 - 141.153.164.30)
Posted on Sunday, March 07, 2004 - 12:15 am:   Edit Post Print Post

1. Beautiful
2. Is thirst on me (I'm thirsty)
3. Irish (language, not adjective)
4. Is my pants burning (my pants are on fire)
5. I don't know (no, really, that's what it means ;o)
6. Sincerely (closing a letter)

best I can do...

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MAUREEN (65.168.224.10 - 65.168.224.10)
Posted on Sunday, March 07, 2004 - 10:21 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Dear Antaine Thank you for your help. Maureen

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Eamonn OMurchu (216.244.37.100 - 216.244.37.100)
Posted on Sunday, March 07, 2004 - 10:46 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I have to make a short welcome speech at a St.Patrick's dinner, please translate for me:
"Dear friends; My name is Eamonn O'Murchu, chairman of Mission Circle. I wish to welcome you all here on this great feast of St. Patrick, the apostle of Ireland, and I want to thank you for supporting our Mission Circle work. I am sure that we will have a real Irish hooley to night with lots of fun, singing, dancing in community. Again, thank you for coming and have a very happy time."

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Antaine (141.153.164.229 - 141.153.164.229)
Posted on Sunday, March 07, 2004 - 05:41 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

this is the best i can do...if someone would be so kind as to double check my work i'll put up pronunciation for you, too:

A chairde, is mise Eamonn Ó Murchu, cathaoirleach Ciorcail Misean. Is mian liom a fáilte a chur romhaibh anseo ar an Lá Fhéile Pádraigh, an aspal as Éirinn, agus ba mhaith liom a buíochas a ghabháil libh as treisiú le h-obair Ciorcail Misean. Beimid "hooley" ceart againn anocht le craic go leor, gabháil cheoil, 's damhsa sa phobal, cinnte. Arís, go raibh maith agaibh ar teacht agus beidh oíche sona agaibh.

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Poetaster (12.75.206.15 - 12.75.206.15)
Posted on Sunday, March 07, 2004 - 07:25 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Chairde dhil,

Is mise Éamonn Ó Murchú, cathaoirleach Ciorcail an Misin. Ba mhaith liom fáilte mhór a chur romhaibh a bhfuil anseo ar Fheile mhór Phádraig, aspal na hÉireann, agus ba mhaith liom mo bhuíochas a thabhairt daoibh as an obair a rinne sibh ar son oibre an misin. Go raibh míle maith agaibh as a teacht anocht. Beidh oíche rince is spraoi againn agus táim cinnte go mbainfidh sibh sult as.

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Antaine (141.153.164.229 - 141.153.164.229)
Posted on Sunday, March 07, 2004 - 10:24 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

was mine that bad?

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Poetaster (24.185.210.123 - 24.185.210.123)
Posted on Monday, March 08, 2004 - 01:06 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Is mian liom a fáilte/ba mhaith liom a buíochas

I don't understand your use of "a" before fáilte and buíochas.

an aspal as Éireann.
an t-aspal and he wasn't from Ireland, remember?

Beimid "hooley" We will be a "hooley." ????

You're translating directly from English to Irish and it doesn't work. Be careful of that.

I know my contribution can be improved upon but there's more Irish idiom in it.

Good luck with your study of Irish.

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Antaine (141.153.172.89 - 141.153.172.89)
Posted on Monday, March 08, 2004 - 03:53 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

use of 'a' - what i was least comfortable with...the only examples i had to work from were verbs like in english....so wrapped up in "welcome" not being a verb i totally forgot that welcomes are before us, so to speak...

yeah, I know...Ireland by way of Roman Britain...

meant to say "will be a hooley at us"

i was working with example sentences trying to modify as best i could...that's probably where the confusion came from

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John Cadigan (172.171.66.112 - 172.171.66.112)
Posted on Monday, March 08, 2004 - 04:52 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

My grandmother, 93, recently told me an old saying which her great grandmother used to say whenever some one expressed disappointment or bad news: She would say, "Do not worry, It's a big disadvantage in your favor."
Knowing that this woman, Mary Tuohey Ryan, who emigrated in 1851 was a native Irish speaker from Galway, I was wondering if someone could translate an approximation of this saying for I would like to have it framed in Irish for my grandmother's 94 birthday.
Thank You!

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Evan (66.41.85.140 - 66.41.85.140)
Posted on Tuesday, March 16, 2004 - 08:24 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Go raibh míle maith agat John. I could get the translation for you if you want, I have the English, but I didn't have the Irish 'til now.

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Evan (66.41.85.140 - 66.41.85.140)
Posted on Tuesday, March 16, 2004 - 08:25 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Oh, accidently posted that in the wrong forum, but it is still meant for the same person.

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John Cadigan (66.95.248.135 - 66.95.248.135)
Posted on Wednesday, March 17, 2004 - 08:39 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I'm confused, can you translate that for me?

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miss sinclair (68.44.228.81 - 68.44.228.81)
Posted on Wednesday, March 17, 2004 - 04:05 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

If anyone could please tell me how to spell and say(phonetically), "'child of god".
I would be greatly apprecative.

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Séamas MacGabhann (141.157.34.10 - 141.157.34.10)
Posted on Friday, March 19, 2004 - 11:31 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A Shéain, Astriú agat. Níl imní ort. Tá míbhuntáiste mór i do bhfabhar.
John. Your translation. Do not worry. It's a big disadvantage in your favour.
I am a beginner, so you may want to wait for some more experienced input.

Child of God- Páiste Dia

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Friday, March 19, 2004 - 12:12 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Child of God: Leanbh Dé

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Fear na mBróg (159.134.102.76 - 159.134.102.76)
Posted on Friday, March 19, 2004 - 02:13 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I am God's child = Is mise leanbh Dé

I am a child of God = Is leanbh de chuid Dé mé

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Fear na mBróg (159.134.102.76 - 159.134.102.76)
Posted on Friday, March 19, 2004 - 02:17 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I am God's child = Is mise leanbh Dé

I am a child of God = Is leanbh de chuid Dé mé


This actually reminds me of an album entitled "God's Child" by Nas. Obviously, people are gonna interpret that as akin to Jesus. But actually, his intention was to express "A child of God".

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nikie (69.4.140.212 - 69.4.140.212)
Posted on Friday, March 19, 2004 - 04:34 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

How do you say the word faith in Irish?

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Fear na mBróg (159.134.109.217 - 159.134.109.217)
Posted on Friday, March 19, 2004 - 07:17 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Faith = Belief/Confidence

Belief = Creideamh

Confidence = Muinín


I have faith that you'll suceed = Tá muinín agam go n-éireoidh leat

I have faith in God = Tá creideamh agam i nDia

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nikie (69.4.140.212 - 69.4.140.212)
Posted on Saturday, March 20, 2004 - 03:09 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank You!

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jacadigan (66.95.248.135 - 66.95.248.135)
Posted on Saturday, March 20, 2004 - 10:39 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Á Shéamas
Go raibh míle maith agat.
I appreciate your help.

Séan O'Ceadagaín

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miss sinclair (68.44.228.81 - 68.44.228.81)
Posted on Friday, March 26, 2004 - 10:42 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Fear na mBróg
Aonghus
Séamas MacGabhann

Thank you for your help

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Friday, March 26, 2004 - 10:48 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Fáilte ó chroí romhat

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Fear na mBróg (159.134.109.199 - 159.134.109.199)
Posted on Friday, March 26, 2004 - 12:31 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá fáilte romhat.

Le meas

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