mainoff.gif
lastdyoff.gif
lastwkoff.gif
treeoff.gif
searchoff.gif
helpoff.gif
contactoff.gif
creditsoff.gif
homeoff.gif


The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2004 (January-March) » Immigration « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

TJ (12.221.34.200 - 12.221.34.200)
Posted on Wednesday, February 18, 2004 - 07:19 am:   Edit Post Print Post

For those living in Ireland:
I'm hoping to move to Ireland next year(Hoping my financial state won't make this impossible) and I'm wondering what one needs to get through immigration. My biggest concern is with immigration checking that you have adequate funds. I would assume you would prove this with a bank statement. But I'm wondering how much money you need for them to let you in considering prospective employement in Ireland obviously wouldn't mean anything to immigration. Would being a student have an effect on how much money you are expected to have(Hoping to go to UCD)?

Thanks
Go raibh maith agat!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Diarmo (217.163.5.253 - 217.163.5.253)
Posted on Wednesday, February 18, 2004 - 08:41 am:   Edit Post Print Post

carb as duit a TJ?

as na Stait Aontaithe?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Fear na mBróg (159.134.102.51 - 159.134.102.51)
Posted on Wednesday, February 18, 2004 - 08:54 am:   Edit Post Print Post

You need information!

I doubt you'll even get into the country without some sort of degree.

You need to contact an Irish Embassy.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Risteárd (138.96.243.2 - 138.96.243.2)
Posted on Wednesday, February 18, 2004 - 09:34 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Yes, there are specific immigration procedures for students. Assuming you're a US citizen you don't need a visa, but on arrival you'll need to tell the immigration offical you're coming to study and after you've been admitted to Ireland, you have to register at the Garda National Immigration Bureau. (That means queueing up in person outside the office, not a brilliant system). For both, you'll like need a letter from the university that has offered you admission, evidence of sufficient funds to pay university fees (tuition) and your living expenses etc.

Tuition can be very hefty for non-EU nationals, typically 15,000 euro/year in UCD. It is "free" for qualifying EU-nationals (there's a charge of 733 euro).

What "evidence of sufficient funds" means is likely at the discretion of the Gardaí or immigration officials.

I think all non-EU citizens studying in Ireland are allowed to work for up to 20 hours per week while they are enrolled in a university.

More info:

http://www.irelandemb.org

http://www.ucd.ie/international.htm

http://www.oasis.gov.ie/moving_country/moving_to_ireland/third_level_education.html.en

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

TJ (12.221.34.200 - 12.221.34.200)
Posted on Saturday, February 21, 2004 - 12:49 am:   Edit Post Print Post

> carb as duit a TJ?
>as na Stait Aontaithe?
Tá mé as na Stait Aontaithe cinnte.

>You need information!
That is what I seek.

>I doubt you'll even get into the country without >some sort of degree.
I am entering the country initially to get a degree.

>You need to contact an Irish Embassy.
I was thinking about doing this and now I think I certainly will though I am somewhat disappointed that the the embassy in Washington DC's site lacks a lot of information.

>evidence of sufficient funds to pay university >fees (tuition) and your living expenses etc
Certainly they wouldn't expect a student to possess enough money for fees before hand. I know that in some other European countries a student's parents are required to agree to pay for any fees/debts if the student is unable to.

>Tuition can be very hefty for non-EU nationals, >typically 15,000 euro/year in UCD. It is "free" >for qualifying EU-nationals (there's a charge of >733 euro).
No question about that! This seems to me to be exploiting overseas students but US schools aren't any better. I don't have much money so I'll have to pay all tuition by taking out loans. I did have a part-time job last year but I was forced to quit due to the excessive workload in the IB program at school but I intend to find another part time job this summer just for saving up for tuition but I'm not enthusiastic that it will be much higher than minimum wage if I can find a job at all due to the terrible local job market.

>I think all non-EU citizens studying in Ireland >are allowed to work for up to 20 hours per week >while they are enrolled in a university.
Yes, this is confirmed by UCD and a government website. And I will certainly have to get a good part-time job(full-time in the summer which is permitted by law) in order to pay for loans and the cost of living off-campus(It wouldn't be feasible to live on-campus if I can't leave the country during the summer).

>More info:
Actually looked at all of those already.

Also, could someone confirm that the only way to become an EU national is to reside in an EU state for five years(After the age 23?!).

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Fear na mBróg (159.134.100.123 - 159.134.100.123)
Posted on Saturday, February 21, 2004 - 03:25 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

You do realize how cold Ireland is, don't you?

Today I left my house for about 10 mins wearing 3 jumpers. I came back freezin.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

JuliaM (12.77.114.145 - 12.77.114.145)
Posted on Sunday, February 22, 2004 - 08:26 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

TJ

May I suggest a site that might be of help...movetoireland.com. It's a dream of mine and I've found it helpful. Are either your parents or grandparents from Ireland? If so and you can provide a paper trail, you might be able to get dual citizenship. There is a book called the Irish Citizenship Handbook from Hungry Hill Press that can provide more information. I do know it can be a long process but certainly worth it if it works out. Good luck!


Julia

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LACAstronomer (129.210.140.25 - 129.210.140.25)
Posted on Sunday, February 22, 2004 - 09:04 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Can any of you who are from Ireland tell me how an American who moved there for a while would be treated? My dad is thinking of getting a summer house in Kilkelly or around there (I have relatives there) and I'm just wondering if the people who live there would have a lot of hostility towards Americans. I didn't expirience any hostility to Americans anywhere in Ireland when I was there on vacation, but I'm wondering if perhaps Americans living there for longer than a couple weeks are seen as "overstaying their welcome" or something. Again, everyone I met in Ireland was perfectly friendly, and I don't mean to imply otherwise. I'm just wondering if there's hostility towards people who stay longer.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

OCG (82.69.43.131 - 82.69.43.131)
Posted on Sunday, February 22, 2004 - 09:16 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

You mean Kilkelly in Co Mayo?? I'm from near there. I don't think anyone in Mayo would have much of a problem with Americans. I'm surprised you feel you have to ask.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LACAstronomer (129.210.140.25 - 129.210.140.25)
Posted on Sunday, February 22, 2004 - 09:51 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Yes, Kilkelly in Mayo. My ancestors are mostly from Kilkelly, Ballyhaunis, and Knock (and then some from Westport and Newport).

I certainly don't mean to imply that anything that happened there made me think we wouldn't be welcomed. In fact, my relatives there were very friendly, as was everyone else I saw in that area. I just wanted to know if there's a general animosity towards Americans who might decide to live there. I really didn't think there was, I was just trying to confirm it.

Where around Kilkelly are you from? Is it one of the little towns nearby, or out in the country?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Risteárd (138.96.243.2 - 138.96.243.2)
Posted on Monday, February 23, 2004 - 06:43 am:   Edit Post Print Post

TJ:

It sounds like you plan to start a undergraduate degree in UCD this autumn, so you need to apply to the Central Applications Office (CAO) in Ireland,
www.cao.ie
and NOT to UCD directly. This is the way the system works in Ireland. Unforunately you've missed the deadline for autumn 2004 (which was 15th December 2003). You might be able to submit a "Late Application" since you're a non-standard applicant, not doing the Irish Leaving Cert exams.

If you just want to do an exchnage/JYA then you apply to UCD directly.

> Certainly they wouldn't expect a student to possess enough money for fees before hand
You need to contact the UCD International Office to ask how this works in. The Immigration Officials will be looking for evidence you can pay or have paid the fees. That might mean a recept showing you've already paid the fees, or bank statements & evidence you've been approved for loans. This is the type of the evidence the INS looks for when students apply for a visa to study in the United States. (I did my PhD in the USA so knew other international students who had to funish these kind of documents)

> Also, could someone confirm that the only way to become an EU national is to reside in an EU state for five years(After the age 23?!).

Becoming a EU national/citizen varies from member state to member state. The Irish embassy in DC has info on applying to Irish citizenship. If you ask because of the lower fees for EU nationals, I can tell you straight off that if you're over 23, have lived outside the EU all your life, don't have an Irish/EU passport, didn't go to secondary school in Ireland etc, then there's no way you'll qualify! Even Irish citizens who grew up in Ireland (but are now over 23) need to have been resident and paid taxes in a EU state for 3 of the last 5 years to qualify for EU fees. For example, an Irish person who's worked or studied outside the EU for the previous 3 years would have to pay the full non-EU rates. If you're under 23 it's your parents residency status that counts.

Ádh mór!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

TJ (12.221.34.200 - 12.221.34.200)
Posted on Tuesday, February 24, 2004 - 12:28 am:   Edit Post Print Post

>You do realize how cold Ireland is, don't you?
Yep. I live in the northern US, I'm used to that kinda climate and I don't mind it.

>Are either your parents or grandparents from >Ireland? If so and you can provide a paper trail, >you might be able to get dual citizenship.
Nope, great-great grandparents. I do plan to obtain dual citizenship after college however.

>It sounds like you plan to start a undergraduate >degree in UCD this autumn, so you need to apply >to the Central Applications Office (CAO) in >Ireland,
No, autumn of 2005. If it was autumn of this year I'd be too late. I've been looking at the CAO application and I think I'm going to have to look over the handbook to find out how to include some information it doesn't directly ask for(Which include my IB grades and transcript).

>If you just want to do an exchnage/JYA then you >apply to UCD directly.
Definitely not an exchange. I'm pursing a 4 year degree in Computer Science(Mabye someone here knows if a BA in CS is looked upon by employers any worse than a BS in CS).

>That might mean a recept showing you've already >paid the fees, or bank statements & evidence >you've been approved for loans.
I'd have to obtain a loan. Though if Immigration expects proof of approval before hand then that means I'd have to get the loan from my credit union or some other financial institution in the US. Paying for a huge loan from a bank/credit union in a country different than where you are seems like it may lead to problems.

>I can tell you straight off that if you're over >23
I am definitely not 23. I said after age 23 because the documents I read indicated that you cannot be an EU national no matter how long you've lived in Ireland if you aren't over 23. I'm looking for anyway to try to decrease the amount of money I'll have to pay for tuition because I do not want to get into debt. It's unfortunate that Ireland/UCD does not give overseas students scholarships and my country gives plenty of incoming overseas students scholarships but NOTHING to its own citizens who are going overseas.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Risteárd (138.96.115.10 - 138.96.115.10)
Posted on Tuesday, February 24, 2004 - 09:37 am:   Edit Post Print Post

>> I'd have to get the loan from my credit union or some other financial institution in the US.

In Ireland, usually tuition fees are paid in full before you can be registered. Perhaps there is an exemption for International students. Ask the UCD International Office about how this works.

>> I am definitely not 23. I said after age 23 because the documents I read indicated that you cannot be an EU national no matter how long you've lived in Ireland if you aren't over 23. I'm looking for anyway to try to decrease the amount of money I'll have to pay for tuition because I do not want to get into debt.

I don't know about the 23 years old age limit for naturalisation. I do think that your eligibility for "EU fees" is determined when you start your degree program and does not change in the subsequent years.

>> It's unfortunate that Ireland/UCD does not give overseas students scholarships and my country gives plenty of incoming overseas students scholarships but NOTHING to its own citizens who are going overseas.

That's not true. Financial aid for overseas undergraduate students is very limited or non-existent in the USA (similarly for non-EU students in the Ireland). In contrast, the situation for overseas PhD students is different: both in Ireland and the USA there are scholarships or fellowships based purely on merit and not on citizenship.

>> I'm looking for anyway to try to decrease the amount of money I'll have to pay for tuition because I do not want to get into debt.

If you want to do a BSc in computer science and then live/work in Ireland, then the cheapest way for you is to attend a university in the USA where you will qualify for financial aid, and afterwards apply for an IT job in Ireland! I don't know your situation or why you want to study CS in Ireland (whereas Irish or Celtic studies in Ireland clearly have an attraction!), but the cost means you should do alot of research on whether you'll be able to afford it. The cost of living in Dublin is *very* high, wages are often much lower than you'd expect in the USA (even in software/IT) etc.

Good luck with your decision. If you decide to come to Ireland then I hope you have a great time!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

TJ (12.221.34.200 - 12.221.34.200)
Posted on Saturday, February 28, 2004 - 11:38 am:   Edit Post Print Post

>I do think that your eligibility for "EU fees" is determined >when you start your degree program and does not change >in the subsequent years.
That's true, just a way of pulling more cash out of the students. Kind of makes UCD look like a money hungry US University :)

>Financial aid for overseas undergraduate students is >very limited or non-existent in the USA (similarly for >non-EU students in the Ireland).
I definitely wouldn't say that about the USA. I've been searching for scholarships. I've not yet found one for use in Ireland that is for undergraduate. I've found a lot for incoming foreign students though. I found a few sites dedicated to listing scholarships for internation students but their their ONLY definition of international is a student from a different country coming into the USA. Mabye I just don't know where to look for scholarships to use in Ireland but I really would need one.

>the cheapest way for you is to attend a university in the >USA where you will qualify for financial aid, and >afterwards apply for an IT job in Ireland!
I'm aware of US vs Irish University prices. The school in my state that I liked the most is actually more than UCD so that's not an option. Basically the only affordable schools are public schools and their tuition is comparable to Griffith College Dublin's. Financial aid for US Citizens in the US isn't as great as it once was. The government isn't going to give me any free money since I have two working parents. Many scholarships are specific to certain types of people(like minorites, etc). Many are only for certain fields(Usually fields that are selected very often like Geology). There's a fair number of scholarships that can be one by writing essays on specific topics(sometimes to promote the organization that is offering it) but they don't offer much money($500) but some of these don't seem to specify country so it may be possible to use them in Ireland.

> I don't know your situation or why you want to study >CS in Ireland (whereas Irish or Celtic studies in Ireland >clearly have an attraction!), but the cost means you >should do alot of research on whether you'll be able to >afford it.
The reasons go beyond any for just attending college in Ireland. I have many reasons to want to live in Ireland and reasons I want to study in Ireland as well. CS is a logical major for me because I have good background in software engineering though Irish and Celtic studies have always been tempting. If UCD had the concept of minors as US universities do, I'd probably minor in Irish or Celtic studies. Another thing to consider is that I would like to take classes for the Irish language and those aren't common in the US(None where I live). I've been considering a BA(CS) instead of a BSc to be able to take some other subjects since you can't really minor at UCD(At least, that's what I've been told). First year I would probably take the arts subjects Early Irish and French assuming I can take Early Irish(Celtic Civilization would be a interesting subject as well but it seems I cannot take two subjects from the same group and I want to keep taking French). Although I've still not been able to find anyone who can tell me if there is any disadvantage to getting a BA in CS as opposed to a BS in CS.

>The cost of living in Dublin is *very* high, wages are >often much lower than you'd expect in the USA (even in >software/IT) etc.
I'm aware of that. I've been told the cheapest place to live around Dublin would be in the suburbs. However I gather that getting a part time job in Ireland during college might be a bit easier than here and it would pay higher(Irish minimum wage is higher than the current one for here and I've been told that you won't usually start at minimum wage in Ireland as you almost ALWAYS do here and where I live in the US, trying to find a part time job is pretty difficult with almost no applications receiving replies). As for wages in professional jobs(Software)... Writing software isn't all about money(it is to a lot of people but that's why the game industry is in such a terrible state) to me. I intend to work in the game industry which often isn't the highest paying industry for programmers. I never expected that wages in the US would be very good by the time I finished a degree. Outsourcing of programming jobs to India is a big problem in the US now.

Anyhow, while I'd rather attend UCD, it seems there are some universities in Ireland that have better fees. So far the only one I've stumbled upon is Griffith(GCD) which has fees around the same as a public US university but I am unsure if it would be a good university of apply to. The university seems pretty small and not very well known and has a limited amount of majors offered(though it has mine, CS but someone pointed out it doesn't have engineering). Dublin City College also appears to be a smaller college that probably is lower cost as well but their fees page is still unavailable so I don't know if it's true yet. Are these schools worth applying to? Are there any other lower cost schools in Ireland?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bradford (24.220.0.48 - 24.220.0.48)
Posted on Saturday, February 28, 2004 - 01:24 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

TJ,

Not to burst your bubble re: CS jobs in Ireland vs. the US, but... Outsourcing is going to be every bit the problem in Ireland that it's becoming in the US. It's going to be a problem anywhere that software developers currently make a good living. Why have the "expensive" local guy when you can get a developer in India with a Masters Degree for 1/5th the money?

I've been in the software development industry for 10+ years. My advice to you is to not major in CS! I assure you that we'll eventually share the same fate as textile workers in the US did a number of years ago.

Bradford

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

OCG (82.69.43.131 - 82.69.43.131)
Posted on Saturday, February 28, 2004 - 04:20 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

TJ,

My advice to you is not to put too much store in advice you get from strangers over the internet.

Hopefully there are others who can give you advice face-to-face where you live.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bradford (24.220.0.48 - 24.220.0.48)
Posted on Saturday, February 28, 2004 - 08:32 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Point taken, Oliver. I have a policy against unsolicited advice that I obviously violated, since I didn't address his query directly. My apologies.

Bradford

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ossian (208.187.65.8 - 208.187.65.8)
Posted on Saturday, February 28, 2004 - 09:45 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

What's the immigration situation for successful artists or authors, or those who are independently wealthy? People who earn money by freelancing, in other words, and are fairly successful. Would they be allowed entrance, and if so, would they be allowed to do freelance work for Irish clientel?

Ossian.

Add Your Message Here
Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.


©Daltaí na Gaeilge