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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2004 (January-March) » "behind" « Previous Next »

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Antaine (141.153.185.86 - 141.153.185.86)
Posted on Thursday, February 05, 2004 - 10:49 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I'm wondering if "behind" (thiar) follows the same pattern as the other prepositions. I mean, "before" (riomh) is there, and "over" (thar) is almost the same word...could thiar be construted thusly?

thiar:
thiaram thiarat thiaris thiaristi thiarainn thiaraibh thiarstu

it seems to me like a no-brainer, but I cannot find "behind" on any list of prepositional pronouns. is there some reason "before" should be a prepositional pronoun, but "behind" not?

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Thursday, February 05, 2004 - 12:09 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thiar is an adverb, not a preposition.

Behind me: taobh thiar díom

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Antaine (141.153.185.86 - 141.153.185.86)
Posted on Thursday, February 05, 2004 - 01:12 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

go raibh maith agat (all i had was the single word added under the list of prepositions from an old class)...

however, if "before" is a preposition, what is its equivalent opposite, "behind" or "after"?

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Celtoid (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Thursday, February 05, 2004 - 06:13 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

roimh - before. tar éis, i ndiaidh - after.

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Friday, February 06, 2004 - 04:25 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I think there is no preposition which is exactly equivalent to "behind" or "after". The phrase will very depending on the exact context.

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