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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2004 (January-March) » Hello « Previous Next »

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Elizabeth (67.32.226.46 - 67.32.226.46)
Posted on Monday, January 12, 2004 - 03:30 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I was wondering if there is a prefered way to start learning the Irish language. I have been interested at learing it for quite some time and I just found this site. Also I am only 15 and people don't really take intentions of teens seriously. Does anybody have any suggestions? Thanks for any help.

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Jonas (213.243.176.251 - 213.243.176.251)
Posted on Monday, January 12, 2004 - 05:42 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Elizabeth, a chara!

I started learning Irish when I was in your age (actually a couple of years older) and I have loads of suggestions ;-) I'm in a hurry right now but I'll post them tomorrow.

Slán go fóill,
Jonas

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OCG (217.155.45.120 - 217.155.45.120)
Posted on Monday, January 12, 2004 - 08:39 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi Elizabeth.

You could take a look at the forum on http://www.irishgaelictranslator.com There's a section there called "learn Irish Gaelic" which ahs got loads of links to learning aids, software, tutition sites, the whole works.

My apologies to Daltai, I'm not trying denigrate this site, it's a great resource here - it's just that there's too much to write down and I'd like E;izabeth to know about all the help there is out there.

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James (199.112.55.122 - 199.112.55.122)
Posted on Tuesday, January 13, 2004 - 09:35 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Elizabeth,

My daughter is 12 (admittedly a bit younger) but she is doing well with a tape and book set called "Buntús Cainte". There is absolutely NO grammar in the book at all. It's just a "hear this--say this" approach. This will get you speaking Irish rather quickly with no worries as to grammar and such.

The next step, and a bit more grammar intense, would be to get a book called "Learing Irish" by Michéal Ó Siadhal and "Irish Grammar Handbook" by Noel McGonagle. Learning Irish is pretty intense but if you use the Irish Grammar Handbook in conjunction with it, you'll do just fine. If you have any questions just post them on this site. There are some outstanding people here and they are more than willing (and eager) to help.

Take things slow, don't get frustrated (Irish will do that to you!) and have fun! When the grammar gets too intense go to Buntús Cainte...I'm 41 and that's what I do!!!

Ard Mheas,

James

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Maidhc Ó G. (4.76.34.228 - 4.76.34.228)
Posted on Tuesday, January 13, 2004 - 10:09 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Dia dhuit, Elizabeth
I agree with OCG and James. I'd also add that when getting "Learning Irish", get the tapes with it. They'll help you a lot with pronunciation. Also, try going to www.rte.ie and listening to 'R na G'.
Árd mhór ort,
Maidhc.

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James (199.112.55.122 - 199.112.55.122)
Posted on Tuesday, January 13, 2004 - 10:28 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Absolutely! I've recommended "Learning Irish" so much that I've almost come to take it for granted that people understand the books and tapes are a set. Bad on me, though. Maidhc is absolutely correct...if you don't have the tapes you will never make sense of the link between Irish spelling and Irish pronunciation. You MUST have the tapes!!

RnaG is a wonderful place to go just to get the sound of Irish. If you can't understand a word, don't worry. In time you will begin to pick up a word or two, then it'll be a phrase or two and then...or so they tell me...you'll start getting full sentences!

Le meas,

James

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Elizabeth (208.183.105.5 - 208.183.105.5)
Posted on Tuesday, January 13, 2004 - 01:51 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Where can I get the tapes and the books?
Thanks
Elizabeth

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Chris (66.237.84.246 - 66.237.84.246)
Posted on Tuesday, January 13, 2004 - 07:25 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

"Irish On Your Own" is another good one (book and tapes). I like it because it's more complete than some of the brief introduction type courses, yet it is not nearly as daunting as "Learning Irish." I have both (and a few others) and they are both great, but Irish on Your Own is a little more "friendly."

Above all, take your time--I might be alone in saying that Irish is a tough language to learn, but I will say it anyway. For me, it takes an amazingly long time to "absorb" even the simplest things. It wasn't like that at all when I learned Spanish. But it is a beautiful language and I'm motivated to learn it--even if it does take me 10 years!

BTW you can get both courses from Amazon.com . They will run you around $50 each.

Slán go fóill

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Murray (198.81.26.45 - 198.81.26.45)
Posted on Tuesday, January 13, 2004 - 10:08 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

i was just wondering if by learning from the teach yourself books will i be able to understand other people actually speaking to me in Irish

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adam (12.146.176.85 - 12.146.176.85)
Posted on Wednesday, January 14, 2004 - 12:28 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I would like to know the word for "freedom" in Irish. I found one dictionary that gave the word "saoradh" but wanted to confirm this as well as how it is written. Can anyone help? Thanks.

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Jessica Ní Chonchúbhair (213.202.160.204 - 213.202.160.204)
Posted on Wednesday, January 14, 2004 - 12:46 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Saoirse. It is also a name. :)
saor-she(I'm crap at phonetics)

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Bradford (216.16.15.66 - 216.16.15.66)
Posted on Wednesday, January 14, 2004 - 01:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Murray,

Learning Irish is, in my opinion, the best self-study course if you with to achieve eventual fluency, both for speaking and listening. It's very intense, but as some say "no pain no gain". Other books generally teach you canned phrases. Those are fine for a little light conversation but that's about it.

Adam,

The word for "freedom" that I use is saoirse.

- Bradford

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Murray (198.81.26.45 - 198.81.26.45)
Posted on Wednesday, January 14, 2004 - 08:49 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Do you know where i can get the learning Irish set including the tapes

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Murray (198.81.26.45 - 198.81.26.45)
Posted on Wednesday, January 14, 2004 - 08:59 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

thanks for the help

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Bradford (24.220.0.48 - 24.220.0.48)
Posted on Wednesday, January 14, 2004 - 10:33 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Murray,

If you are in the US/Canada, Learning Irish is available from Barnes and Noble, Amazon, and I imagine a host of other places. Just search for "Learning Irish" (author is Mícheál Ó Siadhail). Make sure to get the version that includes the book and the tapes.

If you're outside the US/Canada, perhaps you could try the Amazon UK site?

- Bradford

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Murray (198.81.26.45 - 198.81.26.45)
Posted on Thursday, January 15, 2004 - 09:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

thanks for the help bradford. I have only one more question is the Irish Language the same throughout all of Ireland or does it differ from county to county.

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Murray (198.81.26.45 - 198.81.26.45)
Posted on Thursday, January 15, 2004 - 09:18 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you for the help Bradford, but i have one more question is the Irish language the same throughout Ireland or does it differ from county to county

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Murray (198.81.26.45 - 198.81.26.45)
Posted on Thursday, January 15, 2004 - 09:23 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

sorry for posting it twice.

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Bradford (24.220.0.48 - 24.220.0.48)
Posted on Thursday, January 15, 2004 - 09:41 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Murray,

There are three main dialects of Irish spoken in Ireland: Munster, Connaught, and Ulster Irish. Within each dialect there are subdialects. Learning Irish is presented in the Cois Fhairrge subdialect, spoken in parts of County Galway.

There have been many discussions regarding Irish dialects on this discussion board. If you do a search on the word "dialect" you'll get all sorts of matches that will likely answer any questions you might have about the various flavors of Irish.

- Bradford

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Murray (198.81.26.45 - 198.81.26.45)
Posted on Saturday, January 17, 2004 - 01:45 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Thanks for the information

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