mainoff.gif
lastdyoff.gif
lastwkoff.gif
treeoff.gif
searchoff.gif
helpoff.gif
contactoff.gif
creditsoff.gif
homeoff.gif


The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2004 (January-March) » I'm an unhappy Irish person - the sequel of the sequel! « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Cailín (213.202.162.70 - 213.202.162.70)
Posted on Saturday, January 10, 2004 - 11:57 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Hello,
I was wondering, why has "I'm an unhappy Irish person" been taken off? And then, after that, why has "I'm an unhappy Irish person, the sequel" been taken off? Surely, people have a right to free speech?
It was a topic about the language and culture of the Irish and my personal opinion on the subject at the time.
From other people's opinions, I gradually changed my own. So it was positive for me. I felt it was a very interesting discussion. I understand that some people felt it "went on for to long" but surely you could still leave it on for the benefit of people reading it???
Will this topic be taken off as well because it has the same topic headline???!!! I hope not.
Anyway, I'd like to discuss a new topic but felt I wanted my opinions voiced on the other one.
Is there anyone here learning Irish (through Irish) in college? What do they think of it?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Caoimhín O'Cléirigh-Tech Inquiries (Kevin) (138.89.100.240 - 138.89.100.240)
Posted on Saturday, January 10, 2004 - 12:37 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

The discussions were moved to the archives at the understandable request of several readers.

The full text of each is still available.

Caoimhín

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

somhairle_óg (217.42.192.28 - 217.42.192.28)
Posted on Saturday, January 10, 2004 - 02:50 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Cailín,

Although I am not a member of Daltaí na Gaeilge I read your post with interest. I am an Irish language student at the University of Ulster and in the past I, with regret, had the same sort of views about other people learning the language! But since I began learning Irish full time it became clear that the language needs all the help it can get and now I think it's brilliant that people from all over the world want to learn it! Yes it is the Irish language and therefore belongs to the Irish people but that doesn’t mean we can't share it with the world! It's just a shame that some people in our own country, more so the north, marginalise Irish as being "that auld garlic language", while others use it as a political battling ram. We need to get them to accept the language, realise it is not dead, learn it, and protect it; otherwise it won't be going anywhere!

Somhairle
Contae an Dúin

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

rosie (208.181.65.254 - 208.181.65.254)
Posted on Saturday, January 10, 2004 - 03:40 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I am also unhappy about the removal of your posts. I thought it was an interesting conversation and should have been left for anyone to see.

It is also interesting that other "rantings" about politics, and we know whose, are not being removed.

It seems to me that this forum has been taken over by a few members and only their ideas and views are allowed to be seen.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Caoimhín O'Cléirigh-Tech Inquiries (Kevin) (138.89.100.240 - 138.89.100.240)
Posted on Saturday, January 10, 2004 - 06:44 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

See my post above.

The posts in queston have not been "removed", they were relocated to the archives where they can still be read by anyone who cares to look at them. Anyone who feels that there is more to be said on the topic is free to start a new thread and even link back to the archived thread for reference.

I'm an unhappy Irish person

I'm an unhappy Irish person the sequel

All posts end up in the archives sooner or later. About every six months posts with no activity are relocated there to make accessing active discussions easier.

Very few posts are deleted outright, as we are loathe to censor discussions, even those that have no relation to the Irish language, which are discouraged.

Caoimhín

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Cailín (194.165.171.59 - 194.165.171.59)
Posted on Sunday, January 11, 2004 - 06:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

So, what sort of courses are you learning through Irish? I'm learning Irish heritage, grammar, poetry and sean nos songs. Do you find it hard to understand the lectures at all?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Gavin (144.141.194.4 - 144.141.194.4)
Posted on Sunday, January 11, 2004 - 11:35 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Cailín,

I have been wanting for someone in Northern Ireland to answer something for me...I am not sure where the University of Ulster is located but I was wondering if there are a lot of people there who are actually speaking Irish?

I wish to learn the northern dialects. I know all about Donegal and Gweedore...but what I would like to find out is "how goes the battle in the the northern counties?" Do you see a city like Belfast speaking Irish seriously, or what about the other counties? I mean how much Irish is being spoken there?

Gavin

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

somhairle_óg (217.43.158.25 - 217.43.158.25)
Posted on Monday, January 12, 2004 - 08:17 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Cailín,

I'm doing pure Irish language. Loads of grammar which is proving difficult. The tutors are speaking through English which is good, and there are only 3 others in my class so the tuition is more or less 1 to 1 all the time!

For Gavin,

The University of Ulster is the largest university in the north. It has 4 campuses around the country. The largest being in Coleraine, Co.Derry (north coast), Belfast, Jordanstown and in Derry city. I think Irish is taught in 3 of the campuses but only full time in Coleraine. That is where most of the Irish language students are. There is a large population of us. We have An Cumman Gaelach, and have been organising loads of social nights where we can practice. The Coleraine area isn't really the ideal place to be learning Irish, because of all the political crap, but we're only a stones throw away from Donegal and the coures include a 2 week placement in the Gaeltacht at Easter.

Somhairle

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

shay (213.202.164.69 - 213.202.164.69)
Posted on Monday, January 12, 2004 - 09:07 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hey im doing a degree in Gaeilge. No english is spoken it is jus thought irish and can be pretty difficult, especially the grammar. We learn poetry, novels, history of irish, linguistics and loads of grammar!and yeah the lectures can be hard to understand soemtimes

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Liam Ó Briain (194.125.133.220 - 194.125.133.220)
Posted on Tuesday, January 13, 2004 - 01:56 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Gavin,

According to the most recent census for Northern Ireland some 6,000 people classify themselves as fluent speakers. These speakers are mostly located in Belfast and Derry City.There is a small Gaeltacht on the Shaws Road set up in the 1960's. West Belfast has a huge amount of speakers and Belfast is the strongest city in Ireland regarding the language with Irish speaking cafes, daily irish language newspaper, theatre company, radio station, pub all located in the same general area. Unfortunately only West Belfast has realised the importance of Gaeilge to an extent where a lot of it's people can speak it. Irish is not strong throughout the rest of Northern Ireland. The planters who came over to Ulster were largely Gaelic speakers and as recent as the 1911 census in a lot of loyalist areas were returned as having large amounts of Irish speakers. Busloads of people from the Shankill Road have been going to the Donegal Gaeltacht every Summer since 1996. All people on this island should speak Irish no matter what background as it's their language. There is a state funded organisation called Iontaobhas Ultach to promote the language cross community wide.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jessica Ní Chonchúbhair (213.202.160.204 - 213.202.160.204)
Posted on Wednesday, January 14, 2004 - 12:52 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I am going to college next year to do a Celtic Studies degree. OH wait! This year! lol, this September! Wow!

Anyway, yeah. My class has still not learned Tuisil Guinedach or Modh Coinealach. I asked for some notes to teach myself, because I wanted to use modh coinealach in an essay, and she told me to change my plan!

Betcha college will be much better....:)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Shay (213.202.162.65 - 213.202.162.65)
Posted on Wednesday, January 14, 2004 - 08:26 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Well my opinion on it is that if you are going to be studying Irish in college you will have to study the tuiseal ginideach and the modh coinníollach in college so it wont do you any harm to try and get some grasp of them. Even though they can be difficult to understand it doesnt hurt to try and look at them and see what you can grasp. Ask your teacher for some notes and she refuses then buy yourself a good grammar book and see what you can do yourself.
ádh mor!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jessica Ní Chonchúbhair (213.202.165.199 - 213.202.165.199)
Posted on Thursday, January 15, 2004 - 02:39 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I moaned more, tis what I'm good at. So we're learning it as soon as we finish with preparing cupla aiste.

Add Your Message Here
Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.


©Daltaí na Gaeilge