mainoff.gif
lastdyoff.gif
lastwkoff.gif
treeoff.gif
searchoff.gif
helpoff.gif
contactoff.gif
creditsoff.gif
homeoff.gif


The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2004 (January-March) » Simple Help « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Wednesday, December 24, 2003 - 04:19 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Guess who ;-P

I got another odd and moronic question.

How do you say '"life" in Irish?

I hear them use LIFE a lot, and another example is the "Raidió na LIFE"

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

shay (194.165.165.46 - 194.165.165.46)
Posted on Wednesday, December 24, 2003 - 01:39 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

saol or beatha

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Wednesday, December 24, 2003 - 06:14 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thanks Shay :-)


Whats the basic thought on 'Irish On Your own!' By Éamonn Ó Dónaill Deirbhile ní Churrighín?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Chris C (66.237.84.188 - 66.237.84.188)
Posted on Thursday, December 25, 2003 - 11:49 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Alex,
I'm working through that book (and the tapes) right now. I think it's a good course. Make sure you have the book AND tapes, not just the book. I think Deirbhile ní Churrighín and her co-host on the tapes do a good job. They are very pleasant and enjoyable to listen to. I enjoy listening to the other speakers on the tapes, also--some with slightly diferent dialects. Sometimes they speak a little fast for me, but I think that may just be my lack of ability.
I also have the "Learning Irish" course by Mícheál Ó Siadhail. I would suggest going through the "Irish On Your Own" course first, and then "Learning Irish." That's what I've decided to do.

For me, Irish is a tough language--Mostly because I have trouble remembering things after I learn them. I speak Spanish fairly fluently, so I though that Irish would come as easily as Spanish did/does... yea right!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Friday, December 26, 2003 - 03:24 am:   Edit Post Print Post

LOL I find that Irish sticks a little bit slower as well, but I think LOL here I go!

That Irish is much harder to speak out loud, and the lenition and uru all may make you and I (I assume native english speakers) confused because like when do we assume Bhord, bord, and mbord are all the same words, in english it is a difference Luck-duck-lol dont get me started on that one now ;-P

I think Irish is just more complex on the speaking and grammer wise, but the vocab doesnt seem that much harder, also with I know ALL languages have their things that seem moronic to non natives, but I find I can TWIST Irish 'idiocies'( I think thats the right word) to make sense where as spanish ones DONT WHATSOEVER

So I think both are quite equal, each with pros and cons and thanks for the tips :-)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Friday, December 26, 2003 - 03:48 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

How is there KerrY? When Irish has not K or Y originally?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bradford (24.220.0.48 - 24.220.0.48)
Posted on Friday, December 26, 2003 - 05:11 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Alex, Kerry is an English corruption of the Irish Ciarraí.

- Bradford

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Saturday, December 27, 2003 - 02:55 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Ahh I thought it would be something similar to this.....to sad :'(

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Paul Brady (64.12.96.106 - 64.12.96.106)
Posted on Saturday, December 27, 2003 - 09:39 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Alex,

Getting back to your original question, "Life" in "Raidió na Life" is the Liffy River which runs through Dublin.

Raidió na Life is an excellent community run radio station with Irish speaking programming. You can hear some of it on their web site.

Paul Brady

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

alex (64.12.96.106 - 64.12.96.106)
Posted on Saturday, December 27, 2003 - 04:10 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

ahh! LOL my mistake then :-) So is it pronounced in Irish spelling too? Lih-feh?

I got the idea of it being LIFE when I heard LIFE said as LIFE on Raidió na gaeltachta ;-)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Saturday, December 27, 2003 - 11:03 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A few things!

Tá sé ag cur ocras orm-----Is this correct?

tá sé cur ocras orm---it DOES make me hungry, but not now

Tá ocras orm----I am hungry?


Cur --- orm-> as in --- IS MAKING ME HUNGRY NOW!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Al Evans (208.188.101.145 - 208.188.101.145)
Posted on Sunday, December 28, 2003 - 07:36 am:   Edit Post Print Post

> tá sé cur ocras orm---it DOES make me hungry, but not now

Cuireann sé ocras orm.

You use the present habitual for this.

--Al Evans

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Sunday, December 28, 2003 - 02:13 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

What is habitual exactly then?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Al Evans (208.188.101.145 - 208.188.101.145)
Posted on Monday, December 29, 2003 - 11:21 am:   Edit Post Print Post

> What is habitual exactly then?

I guess, from the point of view of an English speaker, it's about the same as the English present. The distinction is, for example,

I am going to the store (now).
Tá mé ag dul go dti an siopa.

I go to the store (usually, every day, etc.).
Téim go dti an siopa.

In many languages, there would be no difference between the two: "Je vais au magasin", for example, could mean either "I go" or "I am going" to the store.

--Al Evans

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Monday, December 29, 2003 - 03:52 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Any tips on grasping this??

So for saying it does make me hungry now I would say tá sé ag cur ocras orm?


Hey my family went spend crazy on some books and I got some Qs....

What are the dialects of the following


Irish on Your own

Learning Irish

Buntús cainte(PI)

And also of those which is the best to go with first? I would say buntús cainte but I only have the first one....

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

James (199.112.55.122 - 199.112.55.122)
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - 02:09 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Alex,

Now you've got yourself some really good material to work with! I'm glad your Christmas had an Irish twist to it.

I don't know much about Irish on Your Own but the other two I have in my "arsenal" of references.

Learning Irish is in the Cois Fhairge dialect that is spoken west of Galway. You'll find that book very heavy on grammar and sometimes overwhelmingly so. The author, Micheál Ó Síadhal (This guy's name has so many fadas in it I almost never get it right), doesn't do alot of explaining when it comes to grammatical terms and such. When I first started I found that this book raised more questions than it answered. Eventually, with the help of the good people on this site, it started to make sense. It is probably one of the most comprehensive texts out there. If you don't have the tapes that go with it, I would highly suggest you get them. You'll never make sense of the pronunciation without them.

Buntús Cainte is exactly what the title says it is: Primary Stage of Speaking. There is absolutely NO grammar addressed in book 1. (Don't know about the rest of the series as I'm still working with book 1) The "dialect" is Standard Irish with no preference given to one region over another. It's a great way to just "do" Irish without getting so bogged down in the rules, etc. I use it when I'm driving down the road or when the ol' brain has just had a rough day. It's a "see it-say it" approach that works very well. Before you know it you'll be able to make some very basic statements about yourself, the weather, other people etc and this is a huge confidence booster.

All in all I'd say you've got some top notch stuff to work with there. Congrats! You'll be speaking Irish before you know it!

Le meas,

James

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alsander (64.12.96.106 - 64.12.96.106)
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - 02:44 am:   Edit Post Print Post

•LOL I hope so! Should I go with buntús cainte first then? the only thing was that I had ONLY the first, and the second and 3rd were nearly $30 a piece! The Irish on Your own one, seems like it has a little grammer and not too much though. I was thinking of going in order of thorughness and grammer...Bunús-Irish on your own- Learning Irish

What is the input here?

•My family also got me the book "Hanbook on Irish grammer"or something like that by Noel something....whats the imput on this one?

•They went spend crazy :-)

•Now I havent decided which one to go with first, but I am VERY impatient...so I went with lesson one of Buntús cainte so far....

It says


Tá sé te

Tá sé an-te

then

Tá sé fliuch

tá sé an-fhliuch

It showed all of these, now I am curious as to HOW DO I KNOW WHEN TO LENITE!? lol

•then Next thing is in pronouncing

An-fhuar agus an-fliuch, they sort of Skipped the FH sound? Shouldnt it make an H sound? This one is almost as hard for me, I think being an English speaker all my life, as the DH and GH! lol Also they sort of made GH a CLEAR Y sound...is this OK?

If it is, then I have been stressing this pronunciation MUCH more that I got to! lol

• I know this isnt Irish related but does anyone know what language this is too? µ? Isnt it like a lower case M in Greek?

•Finally! lol...

Does anyone know anything about this site?

WWW.MyLanguageExchange.com

It looks cool, any good/bad things heard about it?
Anyone interested if it IS good? I think the guy MIGHT give me and a group a discount on a group membership

If not this one anyone know of any other good ones where I can practice Irish in text AND SPEAKING?


•Go raibh maith agat mo chara :-)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

James (199.112.55.122 - 199.112.55.122)
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - 04:43 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Handbook on Irish Grammar by Noel McGonagle is an excellent resource. All by itself it makes for some boring reading but it is a great synopsis of the rules encountered in other texts. I generally have mine readily at hand when I'm studying any other text.

Regarding the lenition with "an". This is another type of "an" than you've encountered before. Rather than "an" as the definite article this is "an" as a superlative particle (at least I think that's what it's called). The rules for lenition when "an" is used as a superlative are a bit different from when it's used as the definite article. As you've already discovered, "t" resists lenition in this case. Check your McGonagle text on superlatives and it should give more detailed information on this subject.

The lenitied "f", which is "fh", results in a silent set of consonants. Fuar become Fhuar, pronounced "oo-uhr", fliuch becomes "fhluich" and is pronounced "luch" with the "ch" given the gutteral sound.

I'll dig out my McGonagle and try to give you a better explanation but now that you have your own resources see what you can find.

Adh mór ort!

James

P.S. µ is a lower case "Mu" which is indeed, a greek letter that corresponds to "M" in english.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

James (199.112.55.122 - 199.112.55.122)
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - 07:01 am:   Edit Post Print Post

The term used for this type of "an" is an "intensive prefix." The rules for lenition when using "an" as an intensive prefix are the same as with "an" as the definite article. Remember the HaLoRaN example? All consonants except those in HaLoRaN will normally lenite. That holds true in the intensive prefix but you must also remember that some additional consonants "Don't Take Séimhu". The D,T and S of those three words are the additional consonants that don't lenite.

An as the intensive prefix also requires a hyphen between itself and the intensified word.

There is an additional intensifying prefix, "Ró" which corresponds to the english word "too."

Rómhór = too big

An-mhór = very big

Ródhána = too bold

An-dána = very bold

Ró always lenites and is usually attached directly to the word it is modifying. The exception is if the word begins with a vowel. In that case, Ró gets a hyphen.

Ró-óg = too young

An-óg = very young

Page 61 in your McGonagle handbook has all of this spelled out very nicely.

Le meas,

James

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (64.12.96.106 - 64.12.96.106)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 03:27 am:   Edit Post Print Post

THanks James! And is it just me or is Irish grammer HOPELESS!?

No input on the other things?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

alex (64.12.96.106 - 64.12.96.106)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 04:06 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I got another question


I spoke to someone who spoke Scots gaelic(Whom by the way called irish a barbaric language )

He used à as opposed to á...he called it a groove? or somehting liek that

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

James (199.112.55.122 - 199.112.55.122)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 05:41 am:   Edit Post Print Post

No, Irish Grammar isn't hopeless, it just takes a lot of constant attention and review. The more you use it, the better you'll get with it.

Other intensifiers are

barr- = oustanding or extraordinary

deá- = good

droch- = bad

fíor- = real, true, genuine

síor- = constant or continual

According to Ó Siadhal, the prefix word is written together with the modified word unless two vowels, two identical consonants, or two pre-fixes in which case the words are separated by a hyphen.

I think this holds true with what McGonagle said but it's just a bit wordy.

Mar sampla:

ro-óg = two vowels so we use a hyphen

droch-chapall = two identical consonant groups (ch) so we use a hyphen

droch-sheanmhathair = two prefixing intensifiers (droch and sean) so we use a hyphen.

Ó Siadhal takes about a page and a half to say what McGonagle says in 1/2 of a page. What's more, Ó Siadhal has his stuff scattered about in several headings. While his information is correct (who am I to say otherwise?) it just isn't as user friendly as McGonagle. This is a perfect example of why I always study with McGonagle as a back-up reference.

Now, as for the Scotsman who called Irish a "barbaric" language....well, he needs to look at the origins of his own language (some would even say his own people)! In the case of what came first, Scots Gaelic or Gaeilge the answer is most assuredly Gaeilge!!!

Le meas,

James

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

alex (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Friday, January 02, 2004 - 04:33 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A chairde! I am yet again confused! lol

Why is it An Ghaeilge and not An Fháinne?
I saw the word "An Fáinne Óir" in a book title?/

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Larry (217.42.55.124 - 217.42.55.124)
Posted on Friday, January 02, 2004 - 07:48 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Fáinne is a masculine noun - Gaeilge is a feminine noun. An Ghaeilge refers to the Irish language in general terms. Study the rules regarding aspiration of nouns.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

alex (64.12.96.106 - 64.12.96.106)
Posted on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 04:59 am:   Edit Post Print Post

So masc dont take the change?

Would you say

Tá mé an-eaglasach---? also how do you say spider?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

An Mídheach Mealltach (194.165.170.91 - 194.165.170.91)
Posted on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 08:25 am:   Edit Post Print Post

No you wouldn't use an adjective to describe being afraid, you'd use the noun:
"Tá an-eagla orm" or "Tá eagla an domhain orm"

Spider is "damhán alla".

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 08:28 am:   Edit Post Print Post

lol ok ty!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

James (199.112.55.122 - 199.112.55.122)
Posted on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 08:51 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Alex,

In Irish when you want to say "I am....whatever" it us usually expressed as "Whatever....is upon me, at me, with me etc." So, when you use the intesifier to express "I am very..." you have to attach it to the "thing" i.e. fear, hunger, sorrow so that you wind up saying "There is much...whatever...on me.

Le meas,

James

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 10:59 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá mé tuirseach..
??

and what is Fáith?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 10:02 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I got another


tá brón orm
and tá mé brónach

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

An Mídheach Mealltach (213.202.163.173 - 213.202.163.173)
Posted on Sunday, January 04, 2004 - 09:03 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Strictly there's nothing wrong grammatically with

Tá mé brónach, but it just not used like that in colloquaill.
It's only learners who try to put an English language structure on something they saw in a dictionary that would say that.
Brónach would only be used as a qualifying adjective after a noun
i.e. fear brónach a sad man.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Sunday, January 04, 2004 - 09:30 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Well I forget who, I think Jonas said you would

Tá mé brónach for I AM SAD not I AM SORRY when I asked how to differentiate between the two...

So I would say

Fear eaglasach?

also

What does

An Leanabh Amadan mean in english? It is scots

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (159.134.62.139 - 159.134.62.139)
Posted on Sunday, January 04, 2004 - 04:59 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Fear eaglach - an easily frightened man, a nervous man

You are correct about tá mé brónach

An leanbh amadán - the idiot child

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

alex (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Sunday, January 04, 2004 - 05:32 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

How come the RTE has spanish on it?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

OCG (217.155.45.123 - 217.155.45.123)
Posted on Sunday, January 04, 2004 - 09:08 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Lot's of Spanish people live and work in Ireland, maybe that's why.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Sunday, January 04, 2004 - 09:29 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I hadnt the slightest idea!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Monday, January 05, 2004 - 06:49 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá tinn uirthi. OR Tá sí tinneach.---she is sick

Tá tinn orm?

An bhfuil Matt ort? OR An matt ort? OR Nach bhfuil Matt ort?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Monday, January 05, 2004 - 07:13 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Can you say


Tá AN aimsir an-fhuar anois.


Or is the AN thing not allowed there or is that only when it means THE?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Tuesday, January 06, 2004 - 04:23 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá mé tinn (aidiacht /adjective)
Tá tinneas orm (ainmfhocal / noun)

An Matt atá ort?

Tá AN aimsir an-fhuar anois. - yes: this is the definite article "The weather"

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (64.12.96.106 - 64.12.96.106)
Posted on Tuesday, January 06, 2004 - 05:35 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

So I can say Either An Matt atá ort? or Nach matt atá ort?


So no difference between the two ways of saying one is sick?


And then AN is only allowed once when it is a definite article?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Wednesday, January 07, 2004 - 04:11 am:   Edit Post Print Post

An Matt atá ort - Is your name Matt? (questioner is not sure of the answer)

Nach Matt atá ort - Isn't your name Matt? (questioner expects the answer to be "Yes, I'm Matt)

Tá mé tinn - I am ill
Tá tinneas orm - I have a specific illness

>>And then AN is only allowed once when it is a definite article

I don't understand your question!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Wednesday, January 07, 2004 - 05:18 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Well like this


In ainm an athar

in THE name of THE father, now we only see ONE AN, I am told you cant have TWO ANs like that

Now I am saying can you say

T'a an aimsir an-fhuar inniu. ?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Thursday, January 08, 2004 - 04:08 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá an aimsir an-fhuar inniu.
You can : the "an" in "an-fhuar" is not an article!

An takes up about a page in a good Irish dictionary, because it can be used in many ways. The sentence you have could be translated word for word as

It is (Tá)
the weather (an aimsir)
very (an-)
cold (fhuar)
today (inniu)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Thursday, January 08, 2004 - 04:59 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I know this, I was just making sure :-)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alsander (64.12.96.106 - 64.12.96.106)
Posted on Sunday, January 11, 2004 - 07:08 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I got some more dumb questions to bedazzle the mind on how slow I really am ;-)

Ar chor ar bith---At all meaning like "I don't understand Irish AT ALL!" ?

I only ask because you might say with Irish agat-at you so I was thinking like MAYBE AT ALL sort of ( Like Go raibh maith ar chor ar bith ) meaning thanks to EVERYONE.

I think it is used in the first way but you never know!

ór agus óir, one is a noun(ór) and the other is an adjective?

Tá sé ór....It is gold

and then Tá sé mo fáinne óir féin....It is my own Gold ring

correct or no?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

OCG (217.155.45.120 - 217.155.45.120)
Posted on Sunday, January 11, 2004 - 08:05 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi Alsander

Ar chor ar bith

If you look up "cor" it means "a turn, a twist or an eventuality". There's a saying "is iomai cor sa saol" (there's many a twist in life)

So, "ar chor ar bith" means "in any eventuality". So, "ní thuigim an Ghaeilge ar chor ar bith" means "I don't understand Irish in any eventuality, no matter what the circumstances".

Ór is gold. "An fáinne óir" is "the ring of gold", Ór changes to the genitive form "óir" in that context..

Now, the last part of your question is one of the trickiest for learners.

Tá sé mo fainne óir féin is WRONG !!! Shock, horror.

The correct way to say it is:

Is é m'fháinne óir féin é.

Why?? Well beacuse when you identify that ring as your own you're CLASSIFYING it, not describing it.

You CAN say: Tá an fáinne órga (the ring is golden)beacuse this is a description.

However, when we need to classify something we use the Is XXX é.

What is that thing?
Cad e an rud sin?

Is fáinne é
It is a ring (the thing has now been classified)

Cén sórt fáinne é?
What kind of ring is it?

Tá sé cruinn agus órga
It is round and golden.
____________________

I've prolly caused you more dismay than I intended, I'll stop tormenting you now.

Hope this helps (and that I
haven't made any mistakes).

Slan go fóill, a chara.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Tuesday, January 13, 2004 - 04:44 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

more more! lol


Nach bhfuil do sheanmháthair an-fhuar anois?

And then

Nach do sheanmháthair í?

Are these both correct sentencs?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Tuesday, January 13, 2004 - 05:40 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Ní uisce agam ar chor ar bith?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Wednesday, January 14, 2004 - 04:08 am:   Edit Post Print Post

l uisce agam ar chor ar bith?

Nach bhfuil do sheanmháthair an-fhuar anois? correct

Nach do sheanmháthair í? correct

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Wednesday, January 14, 2004 - 04:46 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

/me looks shocked and almost scared

I, formed...a sentence in Irish?!

/me faints

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Wednesday, January 14, 2004 - 05:16 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

AN bhfuil do fháinne óir agat?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Wednesday, January 14, 2004 - 05:29 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

An bhfuil an fáinne deairg sin?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Thursday, January 15, 2004 - 04:14 am:   Edit Post Print Post

An bhfuil an fáinne sin dearg? (Is that ring red?)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (64.12.96.106 - 64.12.96.106)
Posted on Friday, January 16, 2004 - 05:19 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Níl me ag dul ar chor ar bith

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

alex (64.12.96.106 - 64.12.96.106)
Posted on Saturday, January 17, 2004 - 01:47 am:   Edit Post Print Post

how do you say

OR?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (64.12.96.106 - 64.12.96.106)
Posted on Saturday, January 17, 2004 - 02:23 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá sé an-fhuar anois ansin, nach bhfuil?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.104 - 193.1.100.104)
Posted on Saturday, January 17, 2004 - 04:49 am:   Edit Post Print Post

.... an-fhuar anois?

Abair é Alex. (You can sing it!)

D'fhéadfá a rá. (You could say that = By God you're not telling a lie)

Níl mé a rá nach bhfuil. (I'm not saying it isn't = Well I suppose you could say that!)


Tá. Tá sé millteanach fuar.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.104 - 193.1.100.104)
Posted on Saturday, January 17, 2004 - 04:55 am:   Edit Post Print Post

.... or ... = nó

An é x nó y atá i gceist agat? (Do you mean x or y?)

Cé acu x nó y a bhí le feiceáil romhat ann? (Was it either x or y that you found there when you arrived?)

Ní raibh ann ach breith nó fág. (It was just a matter of take it or leave it.)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Saturday, January 17, 2004 - 12:55 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Seosamh I am convinced your out to confuse me ! lol

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.104 - 193.1.100.104)
Posted on Saturday, January 17, 2004 - 05:47 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Gabh mo leithscéal Alex. Just take your time with them.

The first post is just a motley of what I would say in reply to your weather comment:

1. Abair é Alex. (You can sing it!)

2. D'fhéadfá a rá. (You could say that = By God you're not telling a lie)

3. Níl mé a rá nach bhfuil. (I'm not saying it isn't (very cold) = Well I suppose you could say that it is very cold!)

4.Tá. Tá sé millteanach fuar.


No. 3 is the one that throws people, probably, as I seldom see it in print, but it is a common native speech attitude and format, so keep an ear for it.
Imagine that some beautiful person comes into a room and draws some immediate praise for their good looks. Someone else makes a negitive comment, 'Well I didn't say she was horrible/or/ I'm not saying she's horrible', which really only accentuates the initial statement because of the vein that it's said in.

Glac go réidh iad / take them in your own time.

Agus go maire tú do chéad abairt Ghaeilge - comhghairdeas - congrats on your serious sentence a few posts back there.

Ádh mór.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Saturday, January 17, 2004 - 07:41 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

serious sentence? lol

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Sunday, January 18, 2004 - 03:36 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Fagaim?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.104 - 193.1.100.104)
Posted on Monday, January 19, 2004 - 05:57 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Fágaim = I leave.


But also:

... fágaim. = mar shampla / for example. It generally happens at the end of a sentence (1), but may occur between two phrases (2).

1. Seo nath amháin agus seo nath eile, fágaim. !

2. Seo nath amháin, fágaim, agus seo an dara ceann. !

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Wednesday, January 21, 2004 - 04:44 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

OK! lol

Tá nó níl?

Tá nó níl sé?

An bhfuil sé agat nó níl sé?

An bhfuil sé nó níl sé agat?


Another thing, I feel wierd asking but is anyone willing to maybe here me say these over MSN messenger/MSN? My ID is under e-mail, thanks...

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Thursday, January 22, 2004 - 04:11 am:   Edit Post Print Post

An bhfuil sé agat nó nach bhfuil?
nó níl sé?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

OCG (82.69.43.131 - 82.69.43.131)
Posted on Thursday, January 22, 2004 - 03:23 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I can't follw this at all, frankly.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Thursday, January 22, 2004 - 09:51 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I am saying sentences, and Aonghus is correcting mistakes and showing me what to do with them....experimenting trial and error

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.104 - 193.1.100.104)
Posted on Friday, January 23, 2004 - 06:36 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Obair mhaith, bail ó Dhia oraibh.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (64.12.96.106 - 64.12.96.106)
Posted on Friday, January 23, 2004 - 05:38 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

ok LOL

Ba mhaith liom ag dul go Éire! ?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (64.12.96.106 - 64.12.96.106)
Posted on Friday, January 23, 2004 - 08:29 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá mé an-óg?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.104 - 193.1.100.104)
Posted on Saturday, January 24, 2004 - 05:06 am:   Edit Post Print Post

If Aonghus is taking his Saturday in bed, in the shops, or strolling the beach, I'll chime in for you in a few hours to fill in a bit.

Maith go leor!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

alex (64.12.96.106 - 64.12.96.106)
Posted on Saturday, January 24, 2004 - 03:54 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

llol ok

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Monday, January 26, 2004 - 04:19 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Ba mhaith liom ag dul go hÉireann

(Ní bhímse ar líne ró mhinic ag an deire seachtaine - tá clann agam!)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Monday, January 26, 2004 - 05:10 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Something about the clann at me or on me?


Ba mhaith liom ag dul go Albanácheann?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Tuesday, January 27, 2004 - 04:23 am:   Edit Post Print Post

tá clann agam - I have a family

Ba mhaith liom dul go hAlbanácheann?

Where is Albanácheann? I've never come across the name

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jennifer Poole (65.125.52.2 - 65.125.52.2)
Posted on Tuesday, January 27, 2004 - 11:47 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi! I'm new here, and would like to send a greeting to my friend pertaining to Valentine's Day. Unfortunately, I cannot find a translation for it. Any help is appreciated!!!

"May your heart be filled with happiness on this Valentine's Day."

Thank you!

Jennifer

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Wednesday, January 28, 2004 - 04:05 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Go líonfar do chroí le h-áthas ar an Lá le Valintín seo.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jennifer Poole (65.125.52.2 - 65.125.52.2)
Posted on Wednesday, January 28, 2004 - 09:14 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you so very much! :)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (64.12.96.106 - 64.12.96.106)
Posted on Wednesday, January 28, 2004 - 05:21 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Conas tá an cheachta?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Stiofan OSuilleabhain (24.241.237.76 - 24.241.237.76)
Posted on Wednesday, January 28, 2004 - 08:58 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

An bhfuil a fhios ag einne anseo, conas is feidir 'fada' a chur ar mo chuid 'a','e','o'.'i' agus 'u'? Ta me i mo chonai sna Stait Aontaithe anois agus 'keyboard' Mheireacanach in usaid agam. Ach is cuimhin liom go deimhin nuair a bhi me i mo chonai in Eireann, le keyboard 'Eorpach' niorbh ann ach 'ctrl', 'alt' agus an guth (vowel) litir a bhru agus bhi se deanta. Silim go bhfuil gleas/cleas 'cut & paste' le feiceail lastios, ach, nach bhfuil 'cleas' maith eile ann ach an oiread?

(Gabh mo leithsceal freisin as ucht an droch litriu ata soleir sa techtaireact seo)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Maidhc Ó G. (4.76.35.119 - 4.76.35.119)
Posted on Thursday, January 29, 2004 - 08:48 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Dia dhuit, a Stiofain,
Ma gcluin mé do cheist go ceart, Iarradh seo le 'Windows'.

Alt. + 0225 á Alt. + 0193 Á
0233 é 0201 É
0237 í 0205 Í
0243 ó 0211 Ó
0250 ú 0218 Ú

Maidhc.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Larry (217.42.55.124 - 217.42.55.124)
Posted on Thursday, January 29, 2004 - 10:45 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Alex, a chara,

an cheachta??

If you're trying to ask "How is the lesson?" (singular) you'd say "Conas (a)tá an ceacht?" or to ask "How are the lessons?" it would be "Conas (a)tá na ceachtanna?"...

But perhaps I'm missing something.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Thursday, January 29, 2004 - 05:15 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

no no thank you!


Anyhow I do believe someone asked about the é ?


If you have windows and you go into langugaes
there is a way to set your KEYBOARD as united states international it allows you to

ãàâäá by typing the symbol then vowel or letter such as ñ or ç (' + c)

If you fiddle aroung there you might find it

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Thursday, January 29, 2004 - 10:29 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Sorry! Tá brón orm! I was saying no, no you gave me what I was looking for, thank you for doing this :-)

Anyhow, I was listening to something in Latvian,

and if I am not mistaken I heard similarities


Tas (I think thats what the whole word was)--was similar to Tá

and like when they asked questions, they changed the verb completely(so my untrained ears thought)

and also if I am not mistaken LAHBA means book, and I thought this was similar to Leabhair


Anyone know of this or can correct me on my thoughts here? I am only guessing at it, also the spellings of the latvian words are wrong, I know but I did it more phonetically.

thank you

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Sunday, February 01, 2004 - 02:35 am:   Edit Post Print Post

HOw do you say YOU ARE LISTENING TO RADIÓ NA GAELTACHTA?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

OCG (82.69.43.131 - 82.69.43.131)
Posted on Sunday, February 01, 2004 - 06:55 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá tú/sibh ag éisteacht le RnaG.

I don't think that Latvian and Gaelic are related in any way. The word leabhar (in Irish) comes from the Latin word Liber, which is probably how the Latvian word for book evolved too.

Latin (through the Roman Church) has had a huge impact on Irish and most other European languages too.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alsander (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Tuesday, February 03, 2004 - 07:56 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

An bhfuil tú ag éisteach mé?

nó a mé ?


An bhfuil an A in AG os comhair guta ciúin?


Le do thoil....Scríobh as Béarla nó as Gaeilge, ach scríobh an-bheag.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Wednesday, February 04, 2004 - 04:27 am:   Edit Post Print Post

An bhfuil tú ag éisteach liom

Scríobh as Béarla nó as Gaeilge, ach scríobh beagán - Write in Irish or English, but write a little. (What you had would mean write in very samll letters!)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alsander (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Wednesday, February 04, 2004 - 06:00 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hehe

Well that was my first pure Irish post so I think I did pretty darn good :-P

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alsander (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Wednesday, February 04, 2004 - 06:50 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

An bhfuil an A in AG os comhair guta ciúin?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Thursday, February 05, 2004 - 06:59 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Ní dóigh liom é

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alsander (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Thursday, February 05, 2004 - 05:53 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

That does mean you don't know?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Friday, February 06, 2004 - 04:28 am:   Edit Post Print Post

It means "I don't think so"

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Diarmuid (217.163.5.253 - 217.163.5.253)
Posted on Friday, February 06, 2004 - 05:47 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Alex

Could you tell me a bit about Latvian and Lithuanian..are they Slavic languages? or are they Finnish languges? or are they from another group?

Go raibh maith agat
Diarmuid

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alsander (64.12.96.106 - 64.12.96.106)
Posted on Friday, February 06, 2004 - 10:54 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I tried saying like is the G silent ( ag scríobh ) unless it is in front of a vowel word (Ag éisteach)

And I am sorry but all I can say is that Latvian uses ç and thats all I know, I'm not learning it, but from listening I just though I heard similarities to Irish.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (159.134.63.240 - 159.134.63.240)
Posted on Saturday, February 07, 2004 - 03:12 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

An bhfuil an A in AG os comhair guta ciúin? is what you wrote: Is the "A" in "AG" silent in front of a vowel

An bhfuil an "g" in "ag" ciúin seachas roimh guta? Níl, mar a fuaimníonn mise é. (Not as I sound it). Ach bíonn i gcanúintí airithe. (But it is in some dialects)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

alsander (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Saturday, February 07, 2004 - 04:44 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

ok sorry that was my mistake, I was going back and forth between the dictionary LOL

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alsander (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Tuesday, February 10, 2004 - 12:51 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá sibh ag éisteach le RTE Radió na Gaeltachta.

Is that what they say? It sounds a little wierd...But I think it is that, no?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alsander (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Tuesday, February 10, 2004 - 02:42 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Cén t-ainm atá uirthi/air? yes?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alsander (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Tuesday, February 10, 2004 - 07:42 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

An lá h-uafar

an lá gaofar

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Wednesday, February 11, 2004 - 04:40 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá sibh ag éisteach le RTÉ Radio na Gaeltachta

Cén t-ainm atá uirthi/air? yes!

An lá h-uafar What's this?

an lá gaofar yes!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alsander (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Wednesday, February 11, 2004 - 04:48 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

An lá h-uafar What's this?


Was meant to be like


horrible day

I think it would be more like An lá go huafar?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Thursday, February 12, 2004 - 04:10 am:   Edit Post Print Post

horror uafás
horrible uafásach

So
An lá uafásach - the horrible day
Tá an lá uafásach - the day is horrible

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alsander (64.12.116.204 - 64.12.116.204)
Posted on Monday, February 16, 2004 - 04:31 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

An "as gaeilge" nó "as gHaeilge" é?

An "as béarla" nó "as bhéarla" é?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Fear na mBróg (159.134.101.100 - 159.134.101.100)
Posted on Monday, February 16, 2004 - 07:18 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

as Gaeilge
as Béarla

--

Drill this into your head:

ALL PREPOSITIONS TAKE A H

except...

le
ag
as
go
chuigh
dar
os


"le" and "go" put a H before a vowel:

le háthas, go háit


'i' takes an urú

i gCorcaigh, i mbosca

---

When "an" comes after the preposition:

IN THE SINGULAR EVERYTHING GETS AN URÚ

ag an mbuachaill
ón mbanc
tríd an bhfuinneog
as an gcarr
faoin mbord
leis an bhfear


except...

den
don
sa


which take a H

EXCEPT when the noun begins with a d t or s

den bhuachaill
den duine

sa chistin
sa siopa

don charr
don teach

-----

Some other stuff which I hope is self explanatory to you

Chonaic mé an t-éan
ach, tá suim agam san éan ( ag an éan, faoin éan )

Chonaic mé an tsráid
go fóill, tá suim agam sa tsráid ( ag an tsráid ) ...special treatment!


ag na fir
leis na buachaillí

ar fhir
ar bhuachaillí

den fhir
den bhuachaill


-Fear na mBróg

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Fear na mBróg (159.134.101.100 - 159.134.101.100)
Posted on Monday, February 16, 2004 - 07:25 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Looking over the posts I wanna clear something up:

Dentals don't get a H after dentals

D N T L S

These consonants involve the tongue touching your pallette. No problem, but when one follows right after the other, (with the irish accent in anyway) we prefer not to H the second one. Thus:

An-te
An-deas

An bhean deas
Teideal an dáin

seanbhean
seanteach

-Fear na mBróg

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (64.12.116.204 - 64.12.116.204)
Posted on Monday, February 16, 2004 - 08:05 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I am a little confused but oh well...

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (64.12.113.49 - 64.12.113.49)
Posted on Tuesday, February 17, 2004 - 11:18 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Nach/An bhfuil tú ag dul go leis?

now here is a brain boggler

Are you going with him, TOO?
lol

WOuld it be like leis leis?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Wednesday, February 18, 2004 - 04:29 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Nach/An bhfuil tú ag dul leis, leis? - no "go"

But you could use "freisin" or "chomh maith" to avoid repeating leis.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Àlex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Wednesday, February 18, 2004 - 02:23 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

ok TY, you are very helpful Go raibh maith agat!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Thursday, February 19, 2004 - 12:05 am:   Edit Post Print Post

An bhfuil tú ag dul go hÉriean leis freisin?


Punc=dot?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Thursday, February 19, 2004 - 04:10 am:   Edit Post Print Post

An bhfuil tú ag dul go hÉireann leis, freisin?

An bhfuil tú ag dul leis go hÉireann, freisin?

Ponc = dot

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Brandon Lynn (66.91.187.109 - 66.91.187.109)
Posted on Thursday, February 19, 2004 - 05:10 am:   Edit Post Print Post

My name is Brandon Lynn, and I was hoping someone could help me out with something. I have a large tatoo on my left arm of Irish heritage. And I want to place the words Irish Pride in gaelic or the ancient language, with Irish above my shamrock and Pride below it. If anyone could help me out with how to spell it out in the old languages, whether it be in letters or symbols, it would be greatly appreciated....Please contact me at bl2891@hawaii.rr.com

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

alex (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Thursday, February 19, 2004 - 07:46 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Thanks Aonghus


Go raibh maith agat, so when I hear PUNC RTE they are giving an eamil address?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Thursday, February 19, 2004 - 07:53 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Scoile na Teangaí?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Fear na mBróg (159.134.103.181 - 159.134.103.181)
Posted on Thursday, February 19, 2004 - 09:36 am:   Edit Post Print Post

ag dul go hÉirinn

--

Is ise Éire. Chonaic mé Éire. Bhris Éire an fhuinneog.

Chuaigh mé go hÉirinn. D'fhiafraigh mé d'Éirinn. Léim mé ar Éirinn. Bhí mé ag magadh faoi Éirinn.

Is muidne muintir na hÉireann. Sé sin Taoiseach na hÉireann. Ar léigh tú Bunracht na hÉireann? Bhí mé ag lorg Éireann. Bhí sé ag moladh Éireann. Bhí an gall in aghaidh Éireann.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Thursday, February 19, 2004 - 09:36 am:   Edit Post Print Post

something ponc something is probably an e-mail address, yes.

Scoil na dTeangacha - school of languages.
Scoil na teanga - the school of the lenguage

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Thursday, February 19, 2004 - 01:03 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

ok can someone maybe give me a run down on the whole Érie Ériean Érinn spelling issue?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Fear na mBróg (159.134.103.181 - 159.134.103.181)
Posted on Thursday, February 19, 2004 - 01:43 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Éire : It's a noun

Like every noun, it can be put into different cases:

Nominative case: This is where it is doing the action, eg. "Ireland broke the window."

Dative case: This is where it comes after a preposition, eg. "to Ireland", "from Ireland", "with Ireland".

Posessive case (aka Genetive case): This is where it owns something, eg. "That is Ireland's coat", "We are the people of Ireland", "Bank of Ireland", "The constitiution of Ireland".

Nominative: Éire
Dative: Éirinn
Possessive: Éireann

Sé seo mar a théann sé:

Is maith liom Éire. Bhí mé in Éirinn inné. Thaitin Éire liom. Níor mhaith liom dul go hÉirinn sa gheimhreadh! An maith leat muintir na hÉireann? Cóimeadaim m'airgead i mBanc na hÉireann. Bhí an buachaill óg ag moladh Éireann. D'imir m'fhoireann in aghaidh Éireann.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Thursday, February 19, 2004 - 02:19 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Cén t-ainm atá ar sin leabhar?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Fear na mBróg (159.134.103.181 - 159.134.103.181)
Posted on Thursday, February 19, 2004 - 03:13 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

ar an leabhar sin

Tá sé seo ag teacht amach as m'intinn.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Fear na mBróg (159.134.103.181 - 159.134.103.181)
Posted on Thursday, February 19, 2004 - 03:15 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Agus, a hAlex, thaitneodh "go raibh maith agat" liom nuair a bhím ag caitheamh m'ama féin chun cabhrú le daoine eile gan íoc.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Thursday, February 19, 2004 - 06:39 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Uhm I didnt get that last one, sorrry I dont know that many words..... Cén t-ainm atá ar an leabar? isnt the Genetive of LEABHAR LEABHAIR? And if so isnt Leabhair Thin....would differentiation just be about how it is used

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bernard Brady (64.240.22.77 - 64.240.22.77)
Posted on Thursday, February 19, 2004 - 11:03 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

From an earlier letter
Ta an eagla orm Means There is fear on me. ( I think!}
Ta eagla an domhain orm confuses me.
Is it "There is a deep fear on me. " or is it
"There is a fear of the deep on me"
In doing the exercises om Siadahail's book I have the most trouble with the sentence constructions.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Friday, February 20, 2004 - 04:09 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá eagla orm- I am frightened
Tá an-eagla orm - I am very frightened
Tá eagla an domhain orm - literally "I have the world's fear"; I am extremely frightened.

I avoid translating this as "fear is on me" because I think that is misleading; word for word translations are usually.

Alex:
Cad é ainm an leabhair - genitive - what is the name of the book?
Cén t-ainm atá ar an leabhar sin - what name is on that book (what is that book called) - book is accusative; the object of the verb tá

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

alex (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Friday, February 20, 2004 - 01:47 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Is that


Cad é ainm an leabhair? thing a little more advanced? Also I asked...leabhair(thin/slender) is it just on the usage that you differentiate them?

I thought it was eaglas?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Fear na mBróg (159.134.103.196 - 159.134.103.196)
Posted on Friday, February 20, 2004 - 02:24 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Cad é an -> Cén

--

Leabhar

Singular: Leabhar
Plural: Leabhair
Singular Possessive: Leabhair
Plural Possessive: Leabhar

Mar sin:


Book Shop = Siopa Leabhar

Name of the Book = Ainm an Leabhair


Ar an leabhar, ar na leabhair

--

Ní hea, ní hé "eaglas", "eagla" is ea é

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Friday, February 20, 2004 - 02:46 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

but you say Tá tinneas orm...the s ending


Éist a sé anois! ( listen to ---)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

alex (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Friday, February 20, 2004 - 03:15 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Ba mhaith leat,
an mhaith leat?

Níor mhaith leat, what about the word like NACH?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Fear na mBróg (159.134.100.220 - 159.134.100.220)
Posted on Friday, February 20, 2004 - 10:02 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

tinneas
eagla

Tá tinneas cinn orm
Tá eagla an domhain orm

Ar mhaith leat é? ::::::::::::::::: Wud u like it?
Ba mhaith liom é :::::::::::::::::::: I wud like it
Níor mhaith liom é :::::::::::::::: I wudnt like it
Nár mhaith leat é? :::::::::::: Wudnt u like it?

An maith leat é? ::::::::: Do u like it?
Is maith liom é :::::::::: I like it
Ní maith liom é ::::::::::: I dont like it
Nach maith leat é? ::::::: Dont u like it?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Friday, February 20, 2004 - 10:43 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Whats with the "wud" and "u"?

Can you say

Ar mhaith leat ag dul go Méirica liom?

can the AG (verb) form serve as saying TO GO(ag dul) ??


What about the command form of Éisteach?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Fear na mBróg (159.134.100.123 - 159.134.100.123)
Posted on Saturday, February 21, 2004 - 03:23 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Verb:

Dún
Bris
Brostaigh
Deisigh

Verbal Noun:

Dúnadh
Briseadh
Brostú
Deisiú


Bhí mé ag dúnadh an dorais.
Bhí mé ag briseadh na fuinneoige.
Bhí mé ag deisiú an bhoird.
Bhí mé ag brostú go Meiriceá.

Is maith liom an doras a dhúnadh.
Is maith liom an fhuinneog a bhriseadh.
Is maith liom an bord a dheisiú.
Is maith liom brostú go Meiriceá.

The verbal noun goes to the end of the sentence UNLESS there's a preposition.

Is maith liom milseáin a thabhairt don bhuachaill.
Is maith liom dul go dtí an siopa.
Is maith liom breith ar pheann.


Verb: Éist

Verbal Noun: Éisteacht

Bhí mé ag éisteacht leis an mbuachaill.

Ba mhaith liom éisteacht leis an gcailín.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (159.134.62.143 - 159.134.62.143)
Posted on Saturday, February 21, 2004 - 04:34 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

wud & u are abbreviations for "would" and "you"

tinneas and tinn are different words

Ar mhaith leat dul go Méirica liom?

can the AG (verb) form serve as saying TO GO(ag dul) ?? You don't need ag in this context

The command form of éist is éist!

You will get a table of verbs at
http://www.csis.ul.ie/scripts/focweb/Exe/focloir.exe
by putiing in any form of the verb

M. ORD. stands for modh orduitheach - command form

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Fear na mBróg (159.134.100.123 - 159.134.100.123)
Posted on Saturday, February 21, 2004 - 06:56 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A hAonghuis, maidir leis an modh orduitheach, cén fath go bhfuil níos mó ná "tú" agus "sibh" ann? Bhí mé ag smaoineamh air agus tháinig mé suas leis seo:

"Look at that garden... I better do something with it"

An eisean seo a bheadh ann?:

"Féach ar an ngáirdín sin... déanaim rud leis"

---

Or:

"We better change that wheel"

->

"Éirímis an rotha sin a athrú"

--

Bhfuil an ceart agam?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Sunday, February 22, 2004 - 02:26 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Go raibh maith agat

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Sunday, February 22, 2004 - 02:48 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Is maith liom ag dul go an chistin anois.

Going to the kitchen now is ok with me.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (159.134.63.64 - 159.134.63.64)
Posted on Sunday, February 22, 2004 - 03:00 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Níor chualas riamh aon phearsa seachas an dara pearsa (uatha nó iolra) den modh orduithreach in úsaid. Bheidh ciall airithe leis an chéad phearsa iolra.
Is dócha go bhfeadfadh na pearsan eile bheith ann, agus go bhfuil siad san foclóir da réir

Ba maith liom dul go an chistin anois - I would like to go to the kitchen now

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (64.12.113.58 - 64.12.113.58)
Posted on Sunday, February 22, 2004 - 04:06 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Ba mhaith liom tú dul go chistin anois (liom).

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (64.12.113.58 - 64.12.113.58)
Posted on Sunday, February 22, 2004 - 04:24 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Níor mhaith liom sé anseo linn.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Monday, February 23, 2004 - 04:59 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Ba mhaith liom - I would like
dá rachfá - if you would go
go dtí an cistin to the kitchen
liom anois - with me now

This is a tricky one: it causes the conditional (modh conníolach) to be used. You can't be sure I'll go.

If it were an order, you would leave out the ba mhaith liom, and it would be

Téigh go dtí an cistin anois!


Níor mhaith liom é a bheith anseo linn.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Fear na mBróg (159.134.109.59 - 159.134.109.59)
Posted on Monday, February 23, 2004 - 08:49 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Níor mhaith liom é a bheith anseo linn.

Are you sure that that would qualify "I wouldn't like him to be here with us.". Would one not have to say:

Níor mhaith liom go mbeadh sé anseo linn.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (64.12.116.204 - 64.12.116.204)
Posted on Monday, February 23, 2004 - 09:10 am:   Edit Post Print Post

what does dtí mean?

and I was reading something and I could have sworn I saw it as an chistin?

Finally what is bheith and mbeadh?


Go raibh maith agaibh(sp)


(is it AlsandEr or AlsandAr?)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Monday, February 23, 2004 - 10:03 am:   Edit Post Print Post

go dtí is a standrad phrase for "to" when a place is meant.

Your right about an chistin - my mistake
cistin - a kitchen
an chistin - the kitchen

beith is the verb "to be" which is horribly irregular!

My version used the verbal noun; Fear na mbróg used the conditional. Both versions are correct.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (64.12.96.106 - 64.12.96.106)
Posted on Monday, February 23, 2004 - 04:30 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

ok lol

Maybe I will ask if I think your wrong more often ;-P

OK now

Arent IS and TÁ the verbs for TO BE?

also the verbal noun version and conditional version are a little more advanced for me, no?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Antaine (141.153.176.207 - 141.153.176.207)
Posted on Monday, February 23, 2004 - 07:58 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

the verb is Bí, with Is the copula form (as he said, beith is the verbal noun "being").

I used to think the same way, about versions being too advanced for beginners. You obviously can't learn everything at once, but something I learned the hard way is that no tense is dispensible...look at how many conditional statements or verbal nouns you use in an hour when speaking in english.

i used to think i could get away with past present future and imperitive. then i realized how essential conditional was. then habitual past. by the time i was done i finally had to admit defeat and say that i would always be linguistically crippled until i learned them all...that the best practice was using it, but i wasn't using it much because most of what i wanted to say i couldn't formulate.

in this short message (by my quick count):

habitual past - 2
conditional - 2
verbal nouns - 3
subjunctive - 1

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (64.12.96.106 - 64.12.96.106)
Posted on Monday, February 23, 2004 - 08:38 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Im just so confused. I feel like I will never manage Irish at all.

It is just SO confusing!


Ba mhaith liom dul go dtí hÉrinn?

HAY-RIN?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (64.12.96.106 - 64.12.96.106)
Posted on Monday, February 23, 2004 - 08:44 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Im just so confused. I feel like I will never manage Irish at all.

It is just SO confusing!


Ba mhaith liom dul go dtí hÉrinn?

HAY-RIN?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex (64.12.96.106 - 64.12.96.106)
Posted on Monday, February 23, 2004 - 08:48 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

OK, over here, in the US, it seems that all those who are uninspired to teach, and have an attitude problem become English teachers. I don't understand half of these terms. If anyone has a good grammer site with Irish, and English examples I would greatly appreciate it and it would help me greatly in learning this and probably make it a little easier.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Antaine (141.153.176.207 - 141.153.176.207)
Posted on Monday, February 23, 2004 - 10:16 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

surely...(sorry...you mentioned a couple of the terms so i thought you knew them from your irish books...and I am an english teacher in the US so :oP lol )

COPULA - the "is" form of the verb "bí" (to be). to be is irregular (doesn't follow the rules/patterns), which is why "tá" is the present form of "bí". it is irregular in other ways as well. As far as i know, "to be" is an irregular verb in every language.

the other things

habitual past - habitual past...let's see...the difference would be "i washed the dishes after dinner" (past) and "I washed dishes for three years over at the Harp and Bard" (habitual past). the two i used were: "I used to think" in two different places (i didn't think it once in the past, it was for an ongoing period...a habit...).

conditional - this you usually find with "if/then" statement...ones where theres a "condition"..."If Jane goes to the mall, then Dick will go as well." Dick's going relies on the condition of whether or not Jane is going. Keep in mind, some of these things don't necessarily translate into special forms in English. Notice how we use "then" and follow it with the future, "will go"...in Irish you would need a special form of "go".

verbal noun - verbal nouns are easy (verbal adjectives are the same idea). take a verb: "to write"..."I write" - present tense..."What do you think about my writing?" "writing" there is not a verb, but it comes from one. "writing" is playing the role of a noun (in english, -ing is a big flag for verbal nouns). "writing" will be treated as if it is a noun (eg. "the writings of Shakespeare" - you would never use "the" with a verb) and will behave as one. In english, to form a verbal noun, you most frequently add -ing. In Irish there are other rules (no -ing) but it's not that different.

A verbal adjective is the same basic idea..."I wrote" - past tense. "It was written"..."written" is not a verb but it comes from one. It is an adjective to describe "it"

subjunctive - okay...this one is the bane of english speakers everywhere studying languages like irish or french or any one that has this tense because, for all intents and purposes, we don't. Well, not exactly. We manage to express the same ideas, but without a special verb tense or even recognition that it's a special case. To say it in Irish, however you'll need to use it...so here we go...

Subjunctive is used to describe or explain that which is not. Confused? Okay...let's break it down. Remember, this "sorta" exists in English. I suppose the best kind of example would be, "I wish that you were here." "were" would need to be in the subjunctive tense. "were" does exist in english in its own right, but look closely: in the past tense, you would say "you were", but in english because it follows the word "that" and is part of a wish (ie something that doesn't yet exist and may never) it is technically subjunctive. Also look that I'm not wishing you once were here many years ago...i'm actually wishing that you are here now. to indicate subjunctive in english we use the past tense in the slot designed for a present tense verb. many other (most other indoeuropean?) languages use the special subjunctive tense in order to express that kind of situation.

I hope that wasn't too too confusing. if you still need more let me know.

DEFINITELY don't get discouraged. did you take a langauge in HS? how many years? how much had you learned after all those years of professional instruction? So pat yourself on the back for what you have taught yourself and keep at it. I would get an English grammar book, the most in depth you can find so you can look up obscure stuff like that. hopefully it'll be one with lots of examples.

conversational is nice, but very limiting. one cannot take the next step without heavy grammar (eventually)...but rome wasn't built in a day...

Bíonn gach tosach lag

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

alex (64.12.116.204 - 64.12.116.204)
Posted on Tuesday, February 24, 2004 - 01:36 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I think I get habitual, as in like it happened, is happening or WILL happen, but the tense doesnt say to what extent or when?

correct me if I am wrong here


And hey! An english teacher w/out an attitude problem! :-P

uhm I don't need you currently, but if you maybe left me a more reliable contact such as email, or anything like that as to where I could ask you about these things in time, if needed
you explained it well, and it really helped me out ( thank you very much! )

And no I didn't take a language in high school, I will when I go :-P I am learning spanish in school, and am only 14, so I don't think I can relate to your example with high school?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Tuesday, February 24, 2004 - 04:28 am:   Edit Post Print Post

This site has some good examples
http://homepage.eircom.net/~eofeasa/

I usually try to avoid explaining grammar!

I speak Irish; when I start trying to think about the grammar or why I say things the way I do, I usually make mistakes....But when I write what my gut feeling tells me correct, it usually is

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Antaine (141.153.176.207 - 141.153.176.207)
Posted on Tuesday, February 24, 2004 - 07:24 am:   Edit Post Print Post

okay...my email is an_piobaire@ireland.com ...i'm still learning myself so my explanations of particular technical irish things may be somewhat limited, but grammatical explanations as above I can handle.

just keep an eye on how you progress in spanish...and that's with a teacher and curriculum....

how long have you been learning irish?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Al Evans (208.188.101.145 - 208.188.101.145)
Posted on Tuesday, February 24, 2004 - 11:38 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Cupla rud...

Antaine: "conditional - this you usually find with "if/then" statement...ones where theres a "condition"..."If Jane goes to the mall, then Dick will go as well." Dick's going relies on the condition of whether or not Jane is going."

I don't believe that statement is actually in the conditional, since it has "goes...will go". I think that, in Irish, this would be:

Má théann Jane go dtí an malla, rachaidh Dick ansin freisin. (Present and future)

I believe that the conditional form of that statement would be "If Jane went to the mall, then Dick would go as well":

Dá rachadh Jane go dtí an malla, rachadh Dick ansin freisin. (Conditional and conditional)

(The clarification is muddied a bit by the use of an irregular verb; sorry:-)

For completeness, one subjunctive form of the statement in English would be:

Should Jane go to the mall, Dick would go as well.

And for even more completeness, I think this is the subjunctive form in Irish:

Dá dtéadh Jane go dtí an malla, théadh Dick freisin. (past subjunctive and past subjunctive)

But I don't believe the subjunctive is used any more in Irish than it is in English.

(It would be a miracle if I did that without any mistakes, mar sin, fáilte roimh gach ceartúchán!)

--Al Evans

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bradford (216.16.15.66 - 216.16.15.66)
Posted on Tuesday, February 24, 2004 - 11:50 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Alex, a chara,

This is a very good thread... However it's getting pretty big and cumbersome. How about creating "Simple Help Part II" (or whatever) for your next question and we retire this particular one?

Le meas,

Bradford

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Antaine (141.153.176.207 - 141.153.176.207)
Posted on Tuesday, February 24, 2004 - 02:27 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Al-

sounds good! thanks...

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

alex (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Tuesday, February 24, 2004 - 04:37 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I was waiting for someone to ask me to do so, Im surprised it took you guys so long :-P

Add Your Message Here
Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.


©Daltaí na Gaeilge