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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (October-December) » Declination of the irish language « Previous Next »

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jessica (143.239.128.38 - 143.239.128.38)
Posted on Monday, November 24, 2003 - 08:03 am:   Edit Post Print Post

hya..this site is fantastic...im hopin it will help me too...i am currently studying irish and i am having difficulty with one aspect...the book is quite difficult to follow and im hoping there are some useful sites that cud be recommened please...im trying to study the decline in the irish language and culture before the invasion of the britains....starting roughtly from the invasion of the normans...can anybody give me any advice in where to look please???

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Jonas (213.243.177.51 - 213.243.177.51)
Posted on Monday, November 24, 2003 - 10:58 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Sorry, but what are you talking about? Ireland was invaded in 1170 by Strongbow. What do you mean by a "British invation"? The plantations? Cromwell? King William? Apart from the invasion in 1170, and earlier Viking invasions, there is nothing I would call an invasion.

However, the history of the decline if well known, so if you specify what you mean I'm sure you'll get answers.

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Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.104 - 193.1.100.104)
Posted on Monday, November 24, 2003 - 11:03 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Mholfainn ceann ar bith de dhá leabhar Sheáin de Fréine, 'Saoirse gan Só' nó 'The Great Silence'.

Is túisce a gheobhaidh tú in aon leabharlann iad ná i siopa ar bith.

Maidir le téarmaíocht, b'fhearr, b'fhéidir, 'Normannaigh' a thabhairt ar na 'cuairteoirí' sin atá i gceist agat. Níor mar Bhriotanaigh (ná Breatnaigh/Briotánaigh) a mheasadar iad féin ag an am a Jessica, cé go raibh Pléimeannaigh, Breatnaigh, Sasanaigh, Gaeil agus eile in éineacht leo.

Arís ar ais, b'fhéidir gur thúisce a thabharfadh sinne 'Gael' agus 'Fer Féni' orainn féin ag an am ná 'Éireannach'!

D'fhéadfá 'cuairteoirí' a thabhairt orthu chomh maith, le greann.

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Jessica Ní Chonchúbhair (213.202.164.104 - 213.202.164.104)
Posted on Monday, November 24, 2003 - 11:44 am:   Edit Post Print Post

hey there is another jessica! HI!
hope u get the help you need

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Críostóir (68.163.112.130 - 68.163.112.130)
Posted on Monday, November 24, 2003 - 12:23 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

RE: Decline of An Teanga. Just got this from one of my newsletters. I know politicians of all shade are slow to implement their intentions but...

>>>>>>> Irish placenames back on the map<<<<<<<
The Dublin government has taken its first steps to legally
recognise the original versions of Irish placenames in the 26
Counties.

More than 200 years after the English first attempted to erase
the names and repalce them with Anglicised versions, the
Minister for Gaeltacht Affairs, Eamon O Cuiv, has taken a step
to giving legal standing to Irish place names.

O Cuiv highlighted the inconsistent translations certain names
were given after being changed under British rule.

Mr O Cuiv said it was unacceptable that although place names
in Irish were treated "as if official", they had no actual
recognition in law.

"If the local community wishes to use 'Gaoth Dobhair', 'Dun
Chaoin', 'Casla', 'Tir an Fhia' or 'Cor na Mona', I see no
reason for anybody else to say that these are not the place
names of these places," he said.

The minister has promised to designate place names in all
Gaeltacht areas by the end of the year. But it has been
claimed that it could take up to 10 years to formally
translate place names in the remainder of the 26 Counties back
to the original.

The legal place names of Ireland are currently contained in
the British Ordnance Survey maps which date back to between
1824 and 1874.

All names are in English -- mostly anglicised spellings of the
original Irish language name.

Almost all names fared very poorly in the anglicisation
process some 200 years ago, made famous by the Brian Friel
play 'Translations'.

For example, Beal Atha na Sluaighe -- 'the mouth of the ford
of the crowds' -- became the more pedantic Ballinasloe. Fia
Choill, 'the wood of the deer', became Feakle -- more akin to
'fiacal', the Irish for 'tooth'.

Legislation in 1973 allowed definitive Irish language versions
of place names to be made available, but in legal terms such
names remain in the English language only.

But under new legislation which came into effect on October
30, in an area outside the Gaeltacht, Irish and the English
versions of a place name have the same status.

For Gaeltacht place names, the English version will no longer
be the offical name and will not be used in future
parliamentary Acts, on road or street signs or on Ordnance
Survey Maps.

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Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.104 - 193.1.100.104)
Posted on Monday, November 24, 2003 - 01:20 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Gabh mo leithscéal a Jessica. I spotted the second Jessica just after posting. Oops.

I mentioned two books:
'Saoirse gan Só' nó 'The Great Silence'
by the same author, Seán de Fréine.

Like Jonas, I had to comment some on the matter of terminology also.

Le gach dea-ghuí,

Seosamh

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Jessica Ní Chonchúbhair (213.202.162.109 - 213.202.162.109)
Posted on Monday, November 24, 2003 - 03:30 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Meath na Gaeilge, rud ufasach, gan doubt, ach tá muidne anseo le athbeochán na teanga!

So many books so little time. Presently I am studing for my leaving cert, which im sure I've mentioned and I cant take on any extra material :(. But one day, I'll learn it all I tells ya!Or maybe I'll learn it in college!

Le meas,

jess

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Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.104 - 193.1.100.104)
Posted on Monday, November 24, 2003 - 05:04 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Maith an bhean thú Jessica Ní Ch.

Sin é go díreach. Táimid anseo i mbun na beochana teangan. Abair le cúpla cara leat teacht isteach am éigin chuig na Daltaí anseo.

Is iontach an rud tusa tú féin a bheith linn ar chuma ar bith.

S.

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Jessica Ní Chonchúbhair (213.202.166.70 - 213.202.166.70)
Posted on Monday, November 24, 2003 - 05:59 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Go raibh maith agut, táim féin rí-sastá fiú a bheith i bhur measc!

Tá an suim ar fad ag mo chairde san gcolaiste i na forums gaeilge a bhfuilim ag usáid, ach níl ríomhairí acu! Bhféidir lá eigéan ligfidh mé doibh mo riomhaire a úsaid! Ahh nílim ach ag pleachíocht! ;)

Cinnte, deanfaidh mé iarracht níos mo daoine a fháíl isteach go dtí an suíomh aláinn seo!

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