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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (October-December) » Translation! « Previous Next »

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Georgia Anne Ligus (67.165.87.56 - 67.165.87.56)
Posted on Monday, October 06, 2003 - 12:26 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Can anyone translate this for me to Gaelic?
"For the love of drums and Mother"

Thanks!!

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Joe (62.252.207.170 - 62.252.207.170)
Posted on Monday, October 06, 2003 - 02:36 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Georgia, A Chara,

Perhaps "Ar ghrá drumaí agus Máthar"??? but please wait for somebody more experienced to reply.

Joe (the uncertain one).

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Larry (217.42.53.66 - 217.42.53.66)
Posted on Monday, October 06, 2003 - 03:26 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Joe, a chara,

You're correct in the use of the genitive plural in "drums" and genitive singular in "Mother", but I'd be wary of using the word "grá" when you're refering to a thing - drums - rather than a person. Ar ghrá Dé - For the love of God. It's an interesting point though, and one which I'd like to hear other views on too.

Georgia: "Gaelic" usually refers to Scottish, and I'm afraid my knowledge of that is insufficient to give you a correct answer. Joe's answer 'sounds' right, given my reservations about the use of the word for 'love'.

Le meas,

Larry.

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alsander (64.12.96.106 - 64.12.96.106)
Posted on Tuesday, October 07, 2003 - 10:52 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

How do you say The forest/garden in Irish?

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Wednesday, October 08, 2003 - 04:09 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Forest Forais
Wood Coill
Garden Gairdín

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Alex (67.167.104.192 - 67.167.104.192)
Posted on Wednesday, October 08, 2003 - 04:45 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you! And I want to check:

An forais
Na coill
An Garidín

and then all plurals would have the NA?

and another thing-

In Cén t-ainm atá ort?

Is it like

cén-What
t-ainm=name
atá???
ort-on you

This is all a guess and I wonder on atá, Id imagine something about IS since it had tá, perhaps a different form of it??

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Thursday, October 09, 2003 - 04:11 am:   Edit Post Print Post

The singular is always An
The plural is always na

I'm hopeless on the rules for lenition of nouns, so I'm not going to answer that part of your question, because I'll get it wrong if I think about it!

atá is a form of bheith, to be
The form is called LÁITHREACH COIBHNEASTA by an foclóir beag (Present comparative, perhaps?)

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Nicole (217.173.98.215 - 217.173.98.215)
Posted on Thursday, October 09, 2003 - 07:34 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A hAonghuis, a chara,

Ní “forais” atá ar “forest”, ach “foraois”.

Alex, a chara,

Seo iad foirmeacha na bhfocal atá á lorg agat: (This is I think, what you are looking for)

An fhoraois = The forest
Na foraoisí = the forests

An coill = the wood
Na coillte = the woods

An Gairdín = the garden
Na Gairdíní = the gardens

Essentially, AN causes a séimhiú in feminine nouns (as with ‘foraois’ above), but does not affect masculine nouns (both ‘coill’ and gairdín’ are masculine). NA is the plural of AN in all cases, and does not cause lenition in either masculine or feminine nouns, as long as the noun is the subject of the sentence (i.e in the nominative case). Mutations will occur in the genitive case, but I wouldn’t even begin to worry about that just yet!

Yes, ‘atá’ is a form of the verb ‘bí’, and is essentially used when ‘tá’ occurs in the middle of a sentence or phrase, when you wish to express ‘which is’ or ‘that is’:

An t-ainm atá orm – the name which is upon me

Tá an lá fuar, ach tá sé geal – The day is cold, but it is bright (here ‘tá’ is opening a new, separate phrase after the word ‘but’)

An bia atá ar an mbord – the food which is on the table

An fear atá ag an doras – the man who is at the door

Tá madra mór in aice leis an bhfear atá ag an doras – there is a big dog next to the man who is at the door!

I hope that helps a little, though I’m sure it could be explained better!

Mise le meas,
Nicole

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druniel (81.114.174.254 - 81.114.174.254)
Posted on Thursday, October 09, 2003 - 09:09 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi!
"Go raibh maith agat as ucht an roimhphost" should be 'thank you for your email', but probably it needS some FADA SOMEWHERE!thank you for any help.
druniel

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Thursday, October 09, 2003 - 09:54 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Thanks Nicole
Typo on my part.
btw. A Aonghuis is the vocative (no h)

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Nicole (217.173.98.215 - 217.173.98.215)
Posted on Thursday, October 09, 2003 - 12:13 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Aonghuis,

Gabh mo leithscéal - bhíos ag smaoineamh go raibh 'hAonghuis' mícheart!

Nicole

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ALSANDER (209.109.227.41 - 209.109.227.41)
Posted on Thursday, October 09, 2003 - 10:00 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thanks you guys I mean I am a bit confused but it helps yes a little

a few things


#1 so AN is in front of ANY ANY ANY ANY singular noun, and in feminine it makes a h after the first if it begins with a consanant and a t- if with a vowel?? and NA in ALL ALL ANY plural without ANYTHING being done to the word?? What about A?


#2 why was it bhfear???


#3 why is it Mbord???

and thanks again

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Friday, October 10, 2003 - 04:03 am:   Edit Post Print Post

and NA in ALL ALL ANY plural without ANYTHING being done to the word - no.
Each noun has a plural form.

An coill, na coillte

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Nicole (217.173.98.215 - 217.173.98.215)
Posted on Friday, October 10, 2003 - 05:01 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A chara,

Apologies - I should have anticipated the query about 'bhfear' and 'mbord'. There are several simple prepositions which when combined with 'an' cause an urú (eclipse) on the word which follows. These are:

ar an (on the)
ag an (at the)
leis an (with the)
insan (in the)
faoin (under the)
i (in - this one causes an urú all on its own!)

My advice would be to simply learn this little list off by heart. When used on their own, simple prepositions will often cause a séimhiú:

ar bhord (on a table)
faoi fhuinneog (under a window)
le chara (with a friend)
sa chófra (in the cupboard - 'sa' is a combination of i + an, and is an exception)

Just to confuse you further, 'ag' on its own doesn't change the following word (as I recall. I may be wrong - hopefully someone will correct me if I am!)

Hope that helps a bit!

le meas,
Nicole

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-- (64.12.96.106 - 64.12.96.106)
Posted on Friday, October 10, 2003 - 04:40 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Yea now that my head is spinning!

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