mainoff.gif
lastdyoff.gif
lastwkoff.gif
treeoff.gif
searchoff.gif
helpoff.gif
contactoff.gif
creditsoff.gif
homeoff.gif


The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (October-December) » Irish influence on english « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

paul (194.165.171.117 - 194.165.171.117)
Posted on Friday, October 03, 2003 - 03:43 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

dia dhuit,
as part of my assigment for college i am required to find english words that have been influenced by irish words, does any1 know any?
if any1 does it would be great!

go raibh maith agat

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (159.134.62.174 - 159.134.62.174)
Posted on Friday, October 03, 2003 - 03:48 pm:   Edit Post Print Post


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Caoimhín O'Cléirigh-Tech Inquiries (Kevin) (141.153.206.251 - 141.153.206.251)
Posted on Friday, October 03, 2003 - 03:52 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Paul a chara,

try searching the board. You should find examples galore.

Caoimhín

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jonas (213.243.190.37 - 213.243.190.37)
Posted on Friday, October 03, 2003 - 04:56 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Smashing!
Is maith (é) sin!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

pádraig (199.35.191.229 - 199.35.191.229)
Posted on Friday, October 03, 2003 - 05:00 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

slug -- swallow

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Oliver Grennan (217.155.45.123 - 217.155.45.123)
Posted on Friday, October 03, 2003 - 08:39 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

smithereens, shebeen, bog, glen, Tory....

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PAD (12.89.171.227 - 12.89.171.227)
Posted on Friday, October 03, 2003 - 09:36 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Baltimore, bard, slogan, gulp, banshee, whiskey

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Julia (12.92.124.146 - 12.92.124.146)
Posted on Saturday, October 04, 2003 - 10:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Let's not forget "boycott", after Captain Hugh Boycott (evil land agent) vs. the Land League in the 1870's in County Mayo. Not exactly an influence of an Irish word , but rather an Irish action.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Nick (64.167.99.41 - 64.167.99.41)
Posted on Saturday, October 04, 2003 - 11:31 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dion are you on right now in this forum? Anyway I just wanted to ask also to PAD of what gulp came from in irish. And same with slogan at that?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dion (12.234.103.107 - 12.234.103.107)
Posted on Saturday, October 04, 2003 - 11:36 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dia Duit A dhuine gruagach

Yes, I am here.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dion (12.234.103.107 - 12.234.103.107)
Posted on Saturday, October 04, 2003 - 11:41 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A chairde(did I get that right?)

There is a river that a heard abou that an Englishman wanted to name "the river water", and after asking for water in Ireland, named it the river Usk, after uisce, not knowing that the word for water also meant a type of whiskey.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dion (12.234.103.107 - 12.234.103.107)
Posted on Sunday, October 05, 2003 - 12:10 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Okay, I have some questions:

1. What is the difference between CŽn t-ainm at‡ ort? and Cad is ainm duit?

2. Similarly, what is the difference between ƒamonn at‡ orm and S’le is ainm dom?

3. Do many Gaeilge words change between the masculin, and feminem forms?

4. I keep coming across the words bhfuil, Les meas, and maith, can anybody tell me what they mean?

5. Is there a simple, easy definition for "go"?

6. How do you say "I do not speak Gaeilge"?

I know this is a lot of questions, but don't feel like you have to answer them all, any help is much appreciated.

By the way, does anybody know the legal drinking age in Ireland?

Go raibh maith agat

Dion

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jonas (213.243.174.29 - 213.243.174.29)
Posted on Sunday, October 05, 2003 - 12:28 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dion, fortunately your questions are quite easy to answer so answering them isn't a problem.

1. The difference is one of dialect. Cad is ainm duit is Munster Irish, Cén t-ainm atá ort is Connacht. You can hear both forms in both places, but as a general rule that will work. Use whichever you like.

2. The same as above. Jonas is ainm domsa, since I speak Munster Irish.

3. Do words change? No, almost no words change between being mascline or feminine. (some very few do). 99% of the nouns are either masculine or feminine

4. "bhfuil" is the dependent form of "tá". You can't use "tá" after particles such as "an?" ná?" "ní" "go" etc.
"Le meas" means "with respect", common way of ending a letter.
"Maith" means "good".

5. No ;-) There are many uses for "go", some of them very different from each other. If you have examples I'll interpret the way "go" is used in them.

6. Like this:
- Níl Gaelainn agam. (In Munster)
- Níl Gaeilge agam . (In Connacht)
- Chan fhuil Gaeilig agam. (In Ulster)

I have no idea about the legal drinking age in Ireland, it's hardly enforced... I first visited when I was 19 so I've never had any reason to wonder about it. I'd guess it's 18 as in most other countries.

One thing more: In one of your messages you used "A chairde". That's the way to address a group such as the users as Daltaí. In order to be consistent, you can't use "Go raibh maith agat". True, it means "thanks" but is only directed to one person. To thank a group you say "Go raibh maith agaibh"

Hope this helps!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Maidhc Ó G. (67.235.185.229 - 67.235.185.229)
Posted on Sunday, October 05, 2003 - 01:52 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I've had Ó Siadhail for about 6mos. now. It doesn't give much by way of conversation, but rather as sort of short stories of sort. "The Letter", "The Check", etc.. It's not really geared toward just learning to say something, but more to knowing HOW to say it.
Recently, I went to the library and found a copy of "TYI". I just might get myself a copy for those times if I get tired of all the rules and just want to talk.
I'm also thinking of getting a slang dictionary. I think with these, I can really speed up my progress. I'm also hopeful of getting myself to an immersion soon.
And, oh yeah, other words from Irish to English - brogue, glen, amadan.
-Maidhc.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

. (213.202.165.202 - 213.202.165.202)
Posted on Sunday, October 05, 2003 - 05:19 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

dia dhuit,
the legal age for drinking is 18. and could u not say 'ní labhraím gaelige' for i dont speak irish?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jonas (213.243.174.29 - 213.243.174.29)
Posted on Sunday, October 05, 2003 - 05:39 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dia is Muire dhuit!

Thanks for the giving the drinking age. You could say "Ní labhraím Gaeilge" but it's slightly diferent.
-What do you do today?
-Well, I don't speak Irish = Bhuel, ní labhraím Gaeilge.

To say that you lack the ability to speak Irish you would normally use the forms I gave.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Maidhc Ó G. (67.235.185.191 - 67.235.185.191)
Posted on Sunday, October 05, 2003 - 06:06 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

P.S. Many people confuse the word brogue with the Irish word for shoe - bróg. This is wrong. It comes from "barróg", which means hold or hug. When learning a new language, ones accent from their mother language will still hold onto their tongue. You could say that when speaking Irish, many of us will have an "American brogue".
-Maidhc.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dawn (66.19.56.209 - 66.19.56.209)
Posted on Sunday, October 05, 2003 - 07:15 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

What is meant by words changing between masculine and feminine? I've never heard of that!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Oliver Grennan (217.155.45.120 - 217.155.45.120)
Posted on Sunday, October 05, 2003 - 07:30 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

They say the river Avon comes from the name the local Celtic tribe had for "river". It's similar to our Irish word "abhainn".

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jonas (213.243.177.32 - 213.243.177.32)
Posted on Monday, October 06, 2003 - 05:38 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Absolutely. The Welsh word for river is "afon", and in Welsh "f" is pronounced like "v".

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.104 - 193.1.100.104)
Posted on Monday, October 06, 2003 - 04:54 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

An rud céanna a chairde.
Cuimhnímis na haibhneacha i bhfad soir uainn, na Punjab, .i.
punj + ab =
cúig + abha.

An méid seo a leanas a bhuí de www.yourdictionary.com:

Word History: Punjab, a region of the northwest Indian subcontinent bounded by the Indus River in the west and the Yamuna in the east, comes through Hindi from Persian panj-b, "five rivers," referring to tributaries of the Indus. Persian panj is closely related to Hindi pañc, pronounced (pnch), "five," the source of our punch, a drink that originally contained five ingredients. The Persian and Hindi words are descended from Indo-European *penkwe, which appears in Greek as pente, as in pentagon, and in English as five. The b in panj-b comes from the Indo-European root *ap-, "water, river," and is also found in our word julep, which comes ultimately from Persian gulb, "rose water."

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jonas (213.243.177.32 - 213.243.177.32)
Posted on Monday, October 06, 2003 - 05:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Nach aoibhinn an t-eolas atá id cheannsa!
punj + ab = five rives
pum + afon = five rivers

Bhí sé seo ana-spéisiúil, níor thuigeas riamh gur tháinig an t-ainm Punjab as na focail sin cé go raibh a fhios agam gur teanga indeo-eorpach í.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.104 - 193.1.100.104)
Posted on Monday, October 06, 2003 - 05:27 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Ní i mo cheann féin a céadcheapadh é, a Jonas, caithfead a rá. Chualas'sa an Ollamh B. Ó Madagáin, nó an Ollamh Gearóid Mac Eoin i gcéaduair é. Nílim cinnte cé acu den bheirt a dúirt le linn ranga é, tuairim is 15 bliain ó shin.

Tá an cineál san ábhair ana-spéisiúil go deimhin. Bhí a fhios agam go luafá 'pum(p)' na Breatnaise Jonas. Tá an dá theanga 'gearrtha anuas dá chéile' ina lán leaganacha mar san.
Chualas Seosamh Ó Broin, Béal Feirste/Sasana i rith an tsamhraidh ag áireamh 'punch' an Bhéarla le 'panc' na Hindise thuas. Rud atá le céill, ar ndóigh: 'Give him five'! (= punch)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PAD (12.89.95.2 - 12.89.95.2)
Posted on Monday, October 06, 2003 - 08:39 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Nick - slogan - sluaghairm - war cry, army cry - to rally the army. gulp - ag alpadh - swallowing hastily.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dion (12.234.119.174 - 12.234.119.174)
Posted on Monday, October 06, 2003 - 10:02 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Go raibh maith agaibh

This is very helpful.

What does go mean in:

Go raibh maith agat/agaibh, T‡ mŽ go maith/hiontach/dona, and slan go foill?

Les meas,
Dion

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dion (12.234.119.174 - 12.234.119.174)
Posted on Monday, October 06, 2003 - 10:13 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

sorry about those strange characters, I keep forgetting that my computer does that to the fadas, or is that just on my screen?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jonas (128.214.106.152 - 128.214.106.152)
Posted on Tuesday, October 07, 2003 - 05:35 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Dion, a chara!

The characters look as strange on my screen, but fortunately it's quite simple to know which long vowels you have written.

GO
1. In "go raibh maith agat" go funtions as the subjunctive particle. The meaning is "May it be good at you". To express a wish you use "go" followed by the subjunctive of the verb. In practice this is very restricted and confined to standard phrases, the most usual of which is Go raibh maith agat. Another one in common use is
"go n-éirí an bóthar leat", (may the road rise with you).

2. Go is also used to turn adjectives into adverbs. Here are some examples:
-maith = good ; go maith = well
-cúramach = careful ; go cúramach = carefully
-tapaidh = quich ; go tapaidh = quickly
-dona = bad ; go dona = badly
etc.

3. Slán go fóill is another standard phrase, and I'm having toubble explainin it. Just as we hardly think of the word "welcome" as "may you have come well (from your journey)", altough that's its origin. Slán go fóill is used for Goodbye, but its meaning is "Health still".

As I said, there are many uses of "go", these are but a few of them. Please ask more if you're wondering!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Tuesday, October 07, 2003 - 06:44 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Jonas
I'd have said that "go fóill" means "for a while"
see an Focloir Beag

go fóill (fós; go ceann tamaill eile (fan anseo go fóill)).

Slán go fóill - is used in the sense of "see you later", and means "may you be safe/healthy for a while (until we meet again)"

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

druniel (81.114.174.254 - 81.114.174.254)
Posted on Tuesday, October 07, 2003 - 08:38 am:   Edit Post Print Post

"slogan" is a popular english word from gaelic.
but i don't remember the proper way to write it in gaelic. druniel

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Larry (217.42.55.149 - 217.42.55.149)
Posted on Tuesday, October 07, 2003 - 10:05 am:   Edit Post Print Post

sluagh (host) + gairm (call)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jonas (213.243.190.166 - 213.243.190.166)
Posted on Tuesday, October 07, 2003 - 05:43 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Aonghus, "go fóill" means "yet, still". See An Foclóir Póca ;-)

Yes, it can mean for a while but it can also mean yet, still - interchangeable with "fós".
We can take pleasure in knowing that we are both perfectly right ;-)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Oliver Grennan (217.155.45.123 - 217.155.45.123)
Posted on Tuesday, October 07, 2003 - 07:51 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I was wondering, does the warning shout in golf - Fore! - have anything to do with the Irish word "Faire!" which means "beware".

I have no clue, just guessing.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PAD (12.89.95.124 - 12.89.95.124)
Posted on Tuesday, October 07, 2003 - 09:49 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Cupla focal eile: slob, slue (slew), shanty

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Wednesday, October 08, 2003 - 04:11 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Jonas
The point I was making is that "Slán go fóill" is used in the sense of "See you later".

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Oliver Grennan (217.155.45.123 - 217.155.45.123)
Posted on Wednesday, October 08, 2003 - 04:52 am:   Edit Post Print Post

According to the OED, shanty is not of Irish origin. It comes from French, as far as I recall. I checked it some time ago as it seemed an obvious candidate.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Wednesday, October 08, 2003 - 05:54 am:   Edit Post Print Post

There are two meanings of shanty in English
- sailors song from chanté (french)
- a run down house from sean tigh (Irish)

Also, the OED is notorious for avoiding attributions to Irish or Gaelic at all costs!

http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=shanty
gives both a french canadian and Irish derivation for shanty in the sense of house.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Oliver Grennan (217.155.45.123 - 217.155.45.123)
Posted on Wednesday, October 08, 2003 - 08:28 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Aigh suí....tá dhá insint ar an scéal. GRMA a Aonghuis. An gceapann tú, i ndáiríre, go bhfuil an claonadh frith-Éireannach sin ag lucht an OED? An bhfuil an tuairim sin go foirleathan i measc lucht acadúil na hÉireann?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Julia (12.91.185.61 - 12.91.185.61)
Posted on Wednesday, October 08, 2003 - 09:02 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Even though this will not help Paul now, I wanted to mention that in August of 2004 there will be a new Brewer's Dictionary of IRISH Phrase & Fable. The editors are Jo O'Donoghue and Sean McMahon and the ISBN is 0304363340. You can read a review of what will be covered in the book at Amazon's UK site. It does say word origins will be in the book. I have a Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable, and it's the kind of book you can open at any page and be fascinated for a couple of hours at where words and phrases in the English language came from, so I can't wait for the Irish edition. I hope the projected August date is accurate.

Julia

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Wednesday, October 08, 2003 - 09:14 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá an tuairim maidir leis an OED léite agam cúpla uair. Níl fhios agam faoi forleathan, agus ní ball den lucht acadúil mé fhéin....

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jonas (213.243.191.221 - 213.243.191.221)
Posted on Wednesday, October 08, 2003 - 11:30 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Sorry Aonghus, I misunderstood. You are quite right, Slán go fóill would be translated as See you later, no doubt about it. The only reason I translated as I did was to show the litteral meaning of the words.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Wednesday, October 08, 2003 - 12:14 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Bra!
I only repeated myself to stop us confusing others! (And I avoid literal meanings...)

halsingaer

Aonghus

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tomás (198.22.236.230 - 198.22.236.230)
Posted on Wednesday, October 08, 2003 - 01:14 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A chairde,

"Longshoreman" -- from the Irish word "loingseoir" for "seaman" or "boatman." Aonghus is right, the OED scrupulously avoids attributions to Gaelic whenever possible. I believe that for "longshoreman" they have some lame explanation for it having derived from a descriptive for men who worked "along the shore." PFFFT!
-- Toma/s

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Paul (66.152.218.225 - 66.152.218.225)
Posted on Wednesday, October 08, 2003 - 02:21 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

How about 'shandy'
from 'sean' and 'dí' (genitive of deoch)?

Not positive about this, but it seems right.

Webster's dictionary also appears kinda reluctant to credit the Irish origins of words.

Slán tamall,
Paul

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dion (205.167.47.158 - 205.167.47.158)
Posted on Wednesday, October 08, 2003 - 03:25 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A chairde, I did mean the literal meanings, so go raibh maith agaibh.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dion (12.234.103.107 - 12.234.103.107)
Posted on Wednesday, October 08, 2003 - 06:37 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Does tu mean you, because I'm pretty sure that that's what it means in French(Franaise too.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

déirídh (216.42.67.33 - 216.42.67.33)
Posted on Wednesday, October 08, 2003 - 10:16 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

cé ta sin, "bra" agus "halsingaer?"

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Thursday, October 09, 2003 - 04:07 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Bra and Halsingaer are about the extent of my Swedish knowledge ;-)
Bra = fine
Halsingaer = greetings

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

déirídh (216.42.67.117 - 216.42.67.117)
Posted on Thursday, October 09, 2003 - 08:19 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

had me racking my brain for a while......
a friend of mine from the west would often say something that sounded like "janey." (by itself, maybe as an explative? not sure about grammatical things). any ideas?
le h-árd mheas

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PAD (12.89.79.128 - 12.89.79.128)
Posted on Thursday, October 09, 2003 - 11:56 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A dhéiridh - Janey or Janey Mack is an interjection, a euphemism for the name Jesus. A very common Dublin expression but not Gaeilge, it's pure Bearla.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Seosamh (68.161.112.195 - 68.161.112.195)
Posted on Friday, October 10, 2003 - 12:03 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Paul - Don't forget the English "moniker" or "monicker", meaning "nickname". It's the only word in English I know of that came from Irish (from "ainm" for "name") via Shelta ("munik"). Shelta is a dialect spoken by some in Ireland. It includes a lot of jargon formed by taking Irish words and rearranging their constituent phonemes. So "capall" ("horse") became "lapac".

Aonghus and Paul -- I agree -- I've thought for a long time that English dictionaries, both British and American, are very, very reluctant to credit word borrowings to Irish (and other Celtic languages). There are longstanding prejudices there.

"Shanty" is normally credited to "chantier" , specifically the Canadian French meaning (as I recall) a lumbermen's workplace.

Many people think that "kibosh" (as in "they put the kibosh on that") comes from the Irish "caidhp (an) bháis", a death cap used in executions.

A friend of mine has a pet theory that "dig" in the sense of "understand" ("can you dig that?") comes from " 'duig[eann tú]?) and that "jazz" may come from Irish "teas", based on the similarity in sounds and on the fact that popular Irish and African-American musicians hung out together a lot in the early days of both groups in America.

Don't forget obvious or well known examples of loans from Irish like "shamrock" ("seamróg") and "leprechaun" ("leipreachán"). And "carrageen" ("carraigín" Irish moss) and "carrageenan". The latter is an emulsifier used in things like ice cream that comes from Irish moss. The word comes from a placename in Ireland -- Carragheen, which means "little rock".

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jim (165.123.243.168 - 165.123.243.168)
Posted on Friday, October 10, 2003 - 07:38 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I'm from Philadelphia and around here when we are referring to our backsides (usually when talking to children), we say, "cooley", as in "You fell on your cooley." That may be a local thing, I don't know, but it certainly seems like a reference to "cúlaigh". Has any ever heard of this saying? And am I correct in thinking that this is the origin?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PAD (12.89.95.3 - 12.89.95.3)
Posted on Friday, October 10, 2003 - 06:51 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Jim - That's an expression I've heard from Italians they all use that term so I don't think it's Irish in origin.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

seanJim (67.81.112.165 - 67.81.112.165)
Posted on Saturday, October 11, 2003 - 08:44 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Is sean Jim mise. Tá me i mo chónaí i Nua Eabhrac. Níl fiosracht agam ar “cooley!” ;)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dion (12.234.103.107 - 12.234.103.107)
Posted on Monday, October 13, 2003 - 01:01 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Is there any relation to the the place, as in the Cattle Raid of Cooley?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Monday, October 13, 2003 - 04:31 am:   Edit Post Print Post

If Italians use it it may be colluqial italian for bottom - culo is spanish for the same term (tóin in Irish)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jim (165.123.243.168 - 165.123.243.168)
Posted on Monday, October 13, 2003 - 07:00 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Go raibh maith agaibh,

Dang! I was going to spring it on my Italian in-laws! Oh well!

Jim

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dion (12.234.103.107 - 12.234.103.107)
Posted on Monday, October 13, 2003 - 10:35 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A chairde,

What are the dialects of Ma's Ž do thoil Ž, and Le do thoil?

Les meas,
Dion

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Maidhc Ó G. (67.235.185.129 - 67.235.185.129)
Posted on Tuesday, October 14, 2003 - 10:19 am:   Edit Post Print Post

The Italians I know use the word 'coolies' as a word meaning the pair up front on a man's anatomy. I'm not sure of the spelling, but they'll also refer to them as culliónés or cullións.
One who is brazen or daring is said to have 'a big set of coolies'. Or, if it's very cold, one could be "freezin my freakin' cullións off".
-Maidhc.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Seosamh Mac Murí (193.1.100.104 - 193.1.100.104)
Posted on Tuesday, October 14, 2003 - 12:27 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá mórán an focal céanna faoi bhrí ghaolmhar eile linn sa Ghaeilg:

Coillim, coilleadh, coillte; agus an t-ainmfhocal: coillteán.

Tá focal a bhfuil an cruth agus an bhrí mórán mar a chéile aige i dteanga na Hausaise, sa Nígéire, ach níl leabhar Hausa in aice láimhe agam faoi láthair. (Níl mé a rá nach dtáinig sé isteach sa Hausa as teanga éigin eile, an Laidin san áireamh.)

Add Your Message Here
Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.


©Daltaí na Gaeilge