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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (July-September) » How would you say.... « Previous Next »

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Tomas OCathain (82.40.34.86 - 82.40.34.86)
Posted on Monday, September 29, 2003 - 10:48 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I'm trying to think of a term to describe people of Irish heritage all over the world. I thought perhaps that "Tuatha na Gael" might be an option, but perhaps "Tuatha na Eireannach" might be more what I'm trying to convey?

Any ideas?

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Oliver Grennan (217.155.45.123 - 217.155.45.123)
Posted on Monday, September 29, 2003 - 08:50 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi,
Here's how I see these transalted:

Tuatha na nGael
People of the Gaels
(Don't think it's right, somehow)

Na Gaeil
The Gaels

Tuatha na hÉireann
People of Ireland

Muintir na hÉireann
People of Ireland

Na Gaeil thar lear
The Gaels overseas

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Tuesday, September 30, 2003 - 04:46 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Gael na Cruinne - the gaels of the world
or
Clanna Gael - the clans of the gael

"thar lear" really only makes sense if said from the point of view of Ireland.

Tuath is more usually used to describe the country rather than a people, and it would need to be somebody's people.

I feel Gael is more appropriate than Éireannach, because Éireannach to me means citizenship

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Julia (12.92.111.234 - 12.92.111.234)
Posted on Tuesday, September 30, 2003 - 09:34 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi,

I looked up "descent" in my little Collins and my big Foclóir and ...
"D'iaróibh Éireannach" = of Irish descent, so maybe you could play with it or add something to it to get what you need...I'm not there yet, I'm only up to chapter six in Ó'Siadail. Hope it helps you.

Julia

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M (67.235.185.75 - 67.235.185.75)
Posted on Tuesday, September 30, 2003 - 03:39 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Sílim go raith tú á fháil, a Julia.
Muintir d'iaróibh Éireannach. People of Irish descent.
-Maidhc.

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Julia (12.91.189.19 - 12.91.189.19)
Posted on Tuesday, September 30, 2003 - 04:40 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Maidhc,
Go raibh maith agat! If I'd thought about it for a while, I probably could have come up with that, but I'm still hesitant about testing my knowledge with the "big kids".

Le meas,

Julia

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Paul (66.152.218.225 - 66.152.218.225)
Posted on Tuesday, September 30, 2003 - 04:54 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A chairde,
I don't have it on hand in either language, but doesn't the Proclamation of the Irish Republic
have wording re 'people of Irish heritage'?
Maybe that'd be a good source for the phrase in question.

Le meas, Paul

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Tomas OCathain (82.40.34.86 - 82.40.34.86)
Posted on Tuesday, September 30, 2003 - 06:22 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Go raibh maith agaibh, mo chairde!

I think I could use one of these terms, thanks.
I was basically trying to find a way to describe those who are Irish although not born in Ireland.
Although not wanting to invoke the same kind of connotations, the nearest equivalent would be the term "Volksdeutsche" to describe the German people living outwith Germany but still considered Germans.

Thanks again!

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