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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (July-September) » How do I say, "Shame on you, (one person)" or "You should be ashamed" ? « Previous Next »

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Caitlin Myers (4.64.175.49 - 4.64.175.49)
Posted on Wednesday, September 24, 2003 - 02:32 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Go rabh maith agat,

Caitlín

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Larry (217.42.55.100 - 217.42.55.100)
Posted on Wednesday, September 24, 2003 - 02:59 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Chaitlín, a chara,

A quick answer: Shame on you! = Mo náire thú! (to one person)

Le meas,

Larry.

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Larry (217.42.55.100 - 217.42.55.100)
Posted on Wednesday, September 24, 2003 - 03:18 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

For information on the use of the Irish word for 'should' see http://www.daltai.com/discus/messages/20/11825.html?1063725742

To say "You ought to be ashamed of yourself!" you can use the construction "Ba chóir duit náire a bheith ort!"

Le meas,

Larry.

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Oliver Grennan (217.155.45.122 - 217.155.45.122)
Posted on Wednesday, September 24, 2003 - 08:53 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

How about this one?

Ba cheart go raibh náire ort!

"It would be right that you were ashamed£

Just for info:

Mo naire thú! literally means "you are my shame/embarassment/disgrace".

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Thursday, September 25, 2003 - 04:02 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Ba cheart go mbeadh náire ort!

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James (199.112.55.122 - 199.112.55.122)
Posted on Thursday, September 25, 2003 - 07:06 am:   Edit Post Print Post

go raibh = that you were?

go mbeadh = that you would be?

I'm away from my resources and have been away from Irish (been dabbling in Swahili by necessity) for a couple of months. Just asking, to see if the brain is still working.

Le meas,

James

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Thursday, September 25, 2003 - 09:37 am:   Edit Post Print Post

My gut feeling is that "Ba cheart go" forces the Modh conníollach

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Caitlin Myers (4.64.175.49 - 4.64.175.49)
Posted on Friday, September 26, 2003 - 12:52 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thanks, all. Does the th in thú mean it's pronounced as an "h"? The deal here is that I'd like to respond to some anti-Irish comments, without making a fool of myself.

So, in the dialect I'm studying, where my nickname Cáit sounds like, "catch," how would Mo naire thú sound, spoken conversationally?

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James (199.112.55.122 - 199.112.55.122)
Posted on Friday, September 26, 2003 - 01:18 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

OK. Here's my stab at it. You are correct that the "th" gets treated like a lone "h."

Muh nayruh hoo.

Maybe the muh is better as mah...it's not really a hard "uh" sound but it's not really "ah" either.

We'll get better clarification shortly.

Le meas,

James

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Dawn (66.19.56.47 - 66.19.56.47)
Posted on Friday, September 26, 2003 - 06:36 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Wouldn't that be "Mo náire thú"?

Muh NAH-ruh hoo

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Jonas (213.243.178.51 - 213.243.178.51)
Posted on Friday, September 26, 2003 - 07:19 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I'd say "Mo náire thú" is the best one to use. True, when translated word by word it comes out differently than in English. That's life ;-) (Well, at least it's linguistics) Irish isn't English and there are countless expressions that aren't identical in both languages. The best known is "Go raibh maith agat", I doubt many would want to translate it as "May there be good at you" instead of "thank you". The Irish expression "Mo náire thú" is far better than any new-coined expression that is in fact "English with Irish words".

James and Dawn have given different pronunciations, but they are both right. (If I understand the "English phonetics" correctly). In Ulster it would be /m@ ne:r@ hu/ as James wrote. The long /e:/ could be either an e or a longer form of the "a" in cat /ae:/.
The pronunciation in Munster and Connacht is Dawn's /m@ na:r@ hu(: ) / with the "a" being close to the "aw" in "law" or "a" in "father".

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Caitlin Myers (4.64.175.49 - 4.64.175.49)
Posted on Friday, September 26, 2003 - 08:29 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you all. I love this site!

Caitlín

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