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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (July-September) » 'A' « Previous Next »

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Clare (195.93.34.13 - 195.93.34.13)
Posted on Thursday, August 14, 2003 - 01:53 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hello everyone,

I have noticed 'a' being used a lot in Irish, for example 'ar n-aithair, ata ar neamh', where a is prefixed to ta to mean 'who'?

Could someone please give me examples of how 'a' is used in Irish?

Thanks:)

Clare

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Friday, August 15, 2003 - 04:51 am:   Edit Post Print Post

from An Foclóir Beag http://www.csis.ul.ie/focloir/
a [mír ghairmeach] (vocative)
mír ghairmeach leis an tuiseal gairmeach (A Sheáin, a Mhaighréad, a dhuine chóir, a fheara breátha, a dhaoine uaisle).


a [mír]
mír a úsáidtear le huimhreacha (a haon, a dó, a trí, a ceathair déag, fiche a cúig, uimhir a sé).


a [réamhfhocal]
réamhfhocal in ionad do, de (doras a dhúnadh, bainne a ól, chuaigh sé a chodladh); (a chois na tine; a seacht a chlog).


a [aidiacht shealbhach]
aidiacht shealbhach sa tríú pearsa le hainmfhocal (a bhaile agus a áit, a baile agus a háit, a mbaile agus a n-áit).


a [mír choibhneasta dhíreach]
mír choibhneasta dhíreach (an té a chuireann an síol; an cat a d'ól an bainne; an síol a cuireadh san earrach).


a [mír chéime]
mír chéime (a ghéire atá sé, ar a dhéanaí).

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clare (195.93.34.13 - 195.93.34.13)
Posted on Friday, August 15, 2003 - 04:54 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Go raibh maith agat, a aongus,

Could you translate that into english for me, please? (or could anyone?) I would really appreciate that:)

Clare

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Dawn (66.19.56.23 - 66.19.56.23)
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2003 - 12:12 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Clare, a chara,

I am quite limited in my understanding of Irish, and I took on the translation of this post as a learning experience for myself as well. I think I got it right enough to be of help to you, but I'll let Aonghus be the final judge! Ok, here goes....

[vocative participle]
calling to someone (Seán, Maighréad, chorister [?], fine man, ladies and gentlemen)

[participle used with non-adjective numerals]
counting, citing or calling out a number (one, two, three, fourteen, twenty-five, number six)

[preposition used with verbal noun]
(to shut a door, to drink milk, he went to sleep);(beside [?] the fire; seven o'clock)

[possessive adjective]
in the third person with noun (his home and his place; her home and her place; their home and their place]

[relative direct]
relative verbal participle and pronoun (he who sows seed; the cat which drank the milk; the seed which summons [?] in the spring)

[denotes degree]
(how sharp he is, how late [?])

Hopefully Aonghus will return to correct/adjust this translation (and hopefully it won't need too much correction!)

Slán go fóill.
Tá mé ag dul a chodladh!
Dawn

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Clare (195.93.34.13 - 195.93.34.13)
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2003 - 01:06 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Go raibh mile maith agat, a Dawn!

That is sooo helpful to me:)
Thanks to you both:)

Clare

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Dawn (66.19.56.239 - 66.19.56.239)
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2003 - 07:31 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá fáilte romhat, a Clare.
I was happy to help!

-Dawn

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2003 - 04:30 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Dawn
Very good. I don't know the grammar terms because I don't need them, but what you wrote makes sense.
A few small gotchas
a dhuine chóir - O just person
a fheara breátha - O fine men
a ghéire atá sé how sharp it is (usually, anyway)

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Dawn (66.19.56.77 - 66.19.56.77)
Posted on Tuesday, August 19, 2003 - 01:02 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Aonghus,

Thank you so much. I was hoping for your correction. I just knew there was something wrong with that chorister translation.....
I must admit I relied heavily on Foclóir Scoile, especially for those grammatical terms, but I was quite pleased to have contributed, nonetheless!

-Dawn

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Tuesday, August 19, 2003 - 04:45 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Fáilte romhat
btw:
a dhaoine uaisle means "o noble people" and might be used in company which consisted only of ladies or gentlemen

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Oliver Grennan (217.155.45.122 - 217.155.45.122)
Posted on Tuesday, August 19, 2003 - 09:44 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

One other thing, some times the word "an" is shortened to a'. An example is in plancenames such as Bealach a' Doirín.

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clare (195.93.34.13 - 195.93.34.13)
Posted on Wednesday, August 20, 2003 - 06:13 am:   Edit Post Print Post

[preposition used with verbal noun]
(to shut a door, to drink milk, he went to sleep);(beside [?] the fire; seven o'clock)

This is confusing me a little..could anyone clarify this for me?
I thought that a gerund was the -ing form of a verb when used as a noun, ie 'walking is fun.' This translation looks more like the infinitive of the verb form, 'to shut a door', 'to drink milk'.
Any thoughts? Thanks..

Clare

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