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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (July-September) » Translation « Previous Next »

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lori stokes (205.188.209.12 - 205.188.209.12)
Posted on Tuesday, July 08, 2003 - 12:24 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi I am looking for translations of the following words and phrases. I would appreciate your help.

ta tuirseach orm
ta me go maith
failte romhat
chara
cara

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Peggy OGara (152.163.252.1 - 152.163.252.1)
Posted on Tuesday, July 08, 2003 - 01:00 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hello,

I am looking for a translation for the gaelic word,
"Caramoor"

Thank you

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Maidhc Ó G. (65.128.204.250 - 65.128.204.250)
Posted on Tuesday, July 08, 2003 - 01:38 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá tuirseach orm. I am tired.
Tá mé go maith. I am well.
Fáilte romhat. You're (singular) welcome.
Chara comes from cara, Friend.

My first thought on 'caramoor' is that it comes from 'cara mór' - great friend.
-Maidhc.

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James (199.112.55.62 - 199.112.55.62)
Posted on Wednesday, July 09, 2003 - 02:30 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Antaim leat, a Mhaidc.

I agree with Maidhc on the "caramoor". The other translations are "spot on" without a doubt.

"Cara" means "friend" but changes in several instances, most notably in the vocative case. This is like saying "oh, friend" as you would encounter in an older style of english literature. Mar sampla, "Where are you going, oh friend?" The vocative requires lenition of the initial consonant (add an "h" after it) and it softens the sound thereby making the "k" sound of "cara" more gutteral like the "ch" in the German "ach".

Hope this helps.

Le meas,

James

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