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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (July-September) » Irish spelling « Previous Next »

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Hilda Smith (205.188.209.12 - 205.188.209.12)
Posted on Monday, July 07, 2003 - 10:29 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

What is the Irish Gaelic spelling for the english word Design

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Hilda (64.12.96.234 - 64.12.96.234)
Posted on Tuesday, July 08, 2003 - 01:36 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I would like to know the Irish Gaelic spelling for the English word Design.

Design ( a sketch or drawing )

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Maidhc Ó G. (65.128.204.250 - 65.128.204.250)
Posted on Tuesday, July 08, 2003 - 02:18 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Design n. (scetch, layout, shape) - dearadh.m1
(plan) - leagan m1, amach plean m4.
(pattern) - patrún m1, gréas m3.
(art) - gréas.
(intention) - rún m1.

vt. leag amach, ceap, dear
-Maidhc.

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James (199.112.55.62 - 199.112.55.62)
Posted on Wednesday, July 09, 2003 - 02:22 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Hilda, A Chara,

In Irish context is everything. For example, the m1, m4, stuff that Maidhc has included pertain to the declension rule for each respective word. The "vt" refers to "verb-transitive" and is another grammar component that changes the word depending on usage.

Let us know how you intend to use the word and we can get you a better translation. Be patient, most of us are still studying/learning but we will get you the right answer, eventually.

Le meas,

James

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Hilda (205.188.209.12 - 205.188.209.12)
Posted on Wednesday, July 09, 2003 - 08:40 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Hello James,
What does A Chara and Le meas mean.
I am going to use the Irish Gaelic spelling for the word Design that I am going to put on cards I make. (A Phillips Potter Design, Using the Irish Gaelic spelling for the word Design)

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Bradford (216.16.15.66 - 216.16.15.66)
Posted on Wednesday, July 09, 2003 - 08:53 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Hilda, a chara,

Cara is the root word for "friend" in Irish. A chara used as a letter salutation like you might say "Dear Hilda" in a letter written in English.

Le meas means "with respect", and can be used to close a letter.

James, didn't mean to answer for you, but I figured you had enough on your plate! Any idea when you'll get to come home?

Le meas,

Bradford

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James (199.112.55.62 - 199.112.55.62)
Posted on Wednesday, July 09, 2003 - 09:32 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Bradford, A Chara,

You are correct, the plate is quite full but it's in an on-again-off-again fashion. In my civilian occupation I work in an ER. Our saying there is that it's "hours of boredom punctuated by shear pandemonium." Not too different here, either! As you can see by the number of posts in the past 48 hours, I'm currently in a "lull".

I have no idea when I'll be home. They're talking about some R&R (rest and relaxation) but no firm dates as yet.

Hilda, A Chara:

AS Bradford indicated "Chara" comes from the root word "cara" meaning friend. The "A" is called the vocative particle and roughly translates to "O" as in the antiquated "O Romeo, wherefore out thou?" When you use the vocative particle, and it's only one of many occasions, you must invoke something called lenition. In Irish it's called a Seimhu (Pronounced-Shave you)which is nothing more than the "h" placed after the first consonant. Normally, I would have used "A Hilda, but given that Hilda isn't an Irish name and it begins with one of the few consoanants that doesn't lenite, I chose to use "A Chara".

Le meas is one of many closings you will see on this site. Beannachtai is roughly "blessings",
Go raibh maith agat = "Thank You" when speaking to one person, Go raibh maith agaibh, when addressing more than one person. Ard mheas = with high regard, or great respect. The list goes on and on. It seems I learn a new one every week or so.

Now, back to your original question. (You see, all of this sprinkling of Irish in our responses is designed to get you asking questions--questions beget answers and answers beget more questions--this is all in a not-so-subtle attempt to recruit another student!)

I would use "gréas". It seems to fit your purpose on all fronts. It is used for both art and pattern--both are aspects of what you intend to produce. As a stand alone word "gréas" simply means "Design". If you want to say "The Design" then you'll need to add the definite article "An" which gets us back to-----you guessed it Lenition! So, now you'll have "An Ghréas".

I hope this has helped. If you need any more assistance, feel free to ask. This is one of the ways I learn so it's really no trouble at all.

Beannachtai,

James

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PC (217.155.45.123 - 217.155.45.123)
Posted on Wednesday, July 09, 2003 - 04:34 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I got this wrong too, so to clarify:

'Wherefore art thou Romeo?' means 'why are you (called) Romeo?' and not 'where are you'.

If you saw the play you would see that Romeo is standing right in front of her when she says those lines.

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James (199.112.55.62 - 199.112.55.62)
Posted on Thursday, July 10, 2003 - 01:38 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Really?!?!! Freakin' Shakespeare---all of his stuff is so confusing. Joyce would never have done that to his readers!

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