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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (April-June) » Bí thusa mo shúile « Previous Next »

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Mark (144.141.194.4 - 144.141.194.4)
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 - 10:00 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Mo chairde,

This is one of my favorite hymns, but I can only find the first two verses in Irish...is there anyone here who has all the verses in Irish, or is up to the task of translating the entire song.

I know its a task, one I doubt most are willing to jump on but it never hurts to ask.


Be thou my vision, O Lord of my heart
Naught be all else to me save that thou art
Thou my best thought by day or by night
Waking or sleeping thy presence my light.

Be thou my wisdom, thou my true word
I ever with thee, thou with me, Lord
Thou my great Father, I thy true Son
Thou in me dwelling, and I with thee one.

Be thou my battleshield, sword for the fight
Be thou my dignity, thou my delight
Thou my soul's shelter, thou my high tower
Raise thou me heavenward, O power of my power.

Riches I heed not, nor man's empty praise
Thou mine inheritance, now and always
Thou and thou only, first in my heart
High King of heavem, my treasure thou art.

High King of heaven, after victory won
May I reach heaven's joys, O bright heaven's sun
Heart of my own heart, whatever befall
Still be my vision, O ruler of all.

Mark

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Phil (159.134.209.57 - 159.134.209.57)
Posted on Wednesday, April 16, 2003 - 01:22 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

If it was in English I might try a few lines.

-Phil

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Siobhán (195.93.34.13 - 195.93.34.13)
Posted on Wednesday, April 16, 2003 - 02:08 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Mark,

I found this on google. Not a literal translation, but might be near to what you're looking for. Perhaps some one else can do better!

http://dspace.dial.pipex.com/town/avenue/pa44/laoidhean/hymn005.htm

Slán

Siobhán

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Siobhán (195.93.34.13 - 195.93.34.13)
Posted on Wednesday, April 16, 2003 - 02:16 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Sorry Mark. I should have checked this more carefully - it's Scots Gaelic!

Tá brón orm

Siobhán

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Mark (144.141.194.4 - 144.141.194.4)
Posted on Wednesday, April 16, 2003 - 04:40 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Well,

It was was worth a try, as I said before I have found the first two verses but never the complete song. I have heard a number of people sing it but again they only sing the first two.

Recently, I caught a version sung by a little girl and I have to admit it was a heart stopper.

I will keep trying but thanks anyway to everyone who tried, like I said before it never hurts to ask.

Mark

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Thursday, April 17, 2003 - 04:39 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Mark
I found an English text of the song which says it was translated in the 19th Century from Irish.

I'll keep looking
It would be helpful if you could give me the first line of your translation, since poetic translations make it hard to guess the original first line correctly, and I'm not familiar with this song.

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Thursday, April 17, 2003 - 04:42 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Mark
I found an English text of the song which says it was translated in the 19th Century from Irish.

I'll keep looking
It would be helpful if you could give me the first line of your translation, since poetic translations make it hard to guess the original first line correctly, and I'm not familiar with this song.

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Thursday, April 17, 2003 - 08:35 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Links:
Glossary entry, gives the authors of the english translation
http://www.harbour.sfu.ca/~hayward/van/glossary/vision.html

The original Old/Middle Irish text is here (16 verses!)
http://www.ucc.ie/celt/online/G400018/text001.html

I'll check some books I have at home to see whether I can find a modern Irish version. I'm sure there is one

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Mark (144.141.194.4 - 144.141.194.4)
Posted on Thursday, April 17, 2003 - 07:29 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Aonghus mo chara,

Go raibh maith agat...

I have never seen anything like the verses on ur second site. Is this old or middle Irish? I knew there were many changes going on during the 1500-1700's, and we almost lost the language in the 1800's, but I never new they were so different from modern Irish.

I wonder why in the 1940's they didn't try to revive the language as it existed before?

Mark

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Friday, April 18, 2003 - 04:13 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Languages change.
We are, after al, talking about the language with the longest written record in Europe, after Latin and Greek.

That text is probably from the 9th Century.

The language wasn't dead, ever. The Cáighdéan is based on a synthesis of the language as it was spoken at the time, with an attempt to harmonise usage between three dialects, and to simplify spelling.

I'm not a scholar of Old/Middle Irsih, so I can't tell you.

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