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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (January-June) » Could anyone please help me?! « Previous Next »

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Patrick Ledwell (216.20.1.217 - 216.20.1.217)
Posted on Monday, March 31, 2003 - 08:54 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I am having trouble with the following phrase:Is fearr liom mo shrón agus í beag. If possible could anyone give me a general translation as well as a literal translation? Thank you.
Patrick.

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Al Evans (208.188.101.145 - 208.188.101.145)
Posted on Monday, March 31, 2003 - 10:05 am:   Edit Post Print Post

In English, I'd say:
"I like my nose better. It's small."

Literally, "Is better with me my nose, and it (being) small." Something like that.

--Al Evans--

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James (209.199.97.109 - 209.199.97.109)
Posted on Monday, March 31, 2003 - 10:07 am:   Edit Post Print Post

OK--literal translation, as near as I can figure it:

It is better to me my nose and her small.

That's essentially a word for word translation.

A more reader friendly version would be:

I prefer my nose and it is small.

I think you have a grammatical error with "agus í beag". I think it should be "agus beag é".

I would expect that this is a seanfocal or an idiomatic expression that really does not "translate" worth a flip. Either that or it is part of a larger context driven statement and sounds like gibberish unless taken in that larger context.

Of course, there is the distinct possibility that I am completely wrong on all counts, grammar, translation and context. It would definitely not be the first time! Let's hold on and see what the more seasoned ones have to say.

Le meas,

James

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Monday, March 31, 2003 - 10:21 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Is fearr liom mo shrón agus í beag
means
I prefer my nose when it is small

I'll enlarge on just why this is so when I have a dictionary or three within reach to document this use of agus to mean when

For now, you'll just have to take my word for it!

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Phil (159.134.209.103 - 159.134.209.103)
Posted on Monday, March 31, 2003 - 01:06 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Ba fhearr liom mo shrón dá mbéadh sí beag = Is fearr liom mo shrón agus í beag

I would prefer my nose if it was small. (most accurate)
I prefer my nose when it's small.
I prefer my nose while it's small.

-Phil

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Patrick Ledwell (216.20.1.214 - 216.20.1.214)
Posted on Monday, March 31, 2003 - 01:45 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you all very much!

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Daibhí (63.175.172.129 - 63.175.172.129)
Posted on Monday, March 31, 2003 - 01:56 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Sometimes the old patterns of the English spoken by immigrant ancestors come to mind when trying to understand something like "agus to mean when or while." I recall a great-aunt saying:

"There was Mary kissing on the front porch and himself sitting right there in the parlor."

She meant while the man of the house was sitting in the parlor.

Interesting.

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Tuesday, April 01, 2003 - 04:11 am:   Edit Post Print Post

The article on agus in De Bhaldraithe sheds some light on this use of agus to be when, but I'm too lazy to transcribe it here.

If you haven't got the dictionary, you ought to!

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Phil (159.134.209.20 - 159.134.209.20)
Posted on Tuesday, April 01, 2003 - 12:12 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

On a Dublin bus one day, I was reading the safety notices. I read the English one, it said "When the driver is driving, don't talk to him".
Then I noticed that on the other side, it was written in Irish. I expected the following:

Nuair a bhíonn an tiománaí ag tiomáint, ná labhair leis

But the following was written:

Agus an tiománaí ag tiomáint, ná labhair leis.

Yes, agus was at the start of the sentence.

-Phil

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Wednesday, April 02, 2003 - 03:15 am:   Edit Post Print Post

In the sense of when
It could have been

Ná labhair leis an tiománaí, agus é ag tiomáint.

But you can frequently re order sentences like that.

"Agus" in the when sense can often come at the start of the sentence

Agus mé sa Ghéarmáin, tháinig mé ar an suíomh seo!

There is no compulsion to have word for word correspondence between English and Irish signs, one of them is usually odd when there is.

It looks like Dublin Bus had somebody who actually speaks the language to draw up the sign, as opposed to cut and pasting from a dictionary.

The funniest example of that I've seen was a bookshop in Dublin which had bilingual shelf signs.
The magazines shelf was called "Armlanna" in Irish (magazine in the sense of an Arsenal)

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Maidhc Ó G (65.128.200.236 - 65.128.200.236)
Posted on Wednesday, April 02, 2003 - 10:15 am:   Edit Post Print Post

And who says that reading isn't empowering!? ha-ha-ha.

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