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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (January-June) » Two many celtic translations for one name « Previous Next »

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Santa (141.149.7.232 - 141.149.7.232)
Posted on Thursday, March 27, 2003 - 07:18 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I visited a site whose name I can't remeber. I was trying to find the equvalent to the name James....one other than Seamus. The sight had a name whose pronounciation was Glashan. When trying to find that site again...I came across another site that said James in Celtic was Glaisne. Does anyone know what the translation actually is? My husband wants to have a tattoo of his Celtic name....but which do we have done?...Please help before the mistake becomes permanent!!!!
Santa and James

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Friday, March 28, 2003 - 04:18 am:   Edit Post Print Post

James is of Hebrew origin, and very ancient, so you will find lots of ways of translating it into other languages.

The normal way of translating it as a given name into Irish is Seamús.

This site gives the translations you have
http://www.unet.univie.ac.at/~a8700035/irnames.html

But notice that what they are saying is that when Glaisne or Glashan were being translated into English, James was used as the closest equivalent.


This site http://members.aol.com/oleoghain/irishnames2.htm
gives the meaning of Glaisne as green, grey green,
I'm a bit suspicious of that
the word Glas is a colour description which sometimes means Grey and sometimes green. Other sites give the meaning of Glaisne as being unknown! I have a book of nmaes at home which I will check.

But I think Seamus is really what you want!

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Phil (159.134.209.103 - 159.134.209.103)
Posted on Friday, March 28, 2003 - 01:43 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Seamús -> Séamus

di -> dí

lol

-Phil

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Aonghus (159.134.59.100 - 159.134.59.100)
Posted on Friday, March 28, 2003 - 03:46 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

The following is from Ó Corráin & Maguire, Irish Names

Glaisne: a diminutive form of glas 'green, grey, grey blue'. The name was borne by a son of Conchobar Mac Nessa, king of Ulster.....It survived in Ulster down to the middle of the nineteenth century when it was Anglicised James

Sounds like Glaisne might be what you want. the book mentions it as being a MacMahon & Magennis name in Ulster, so if that is where your roots are, it's probably right.

Phil, a chara. Is eol dom go dtéann fada ar strae orm ó am go chéile. Sin an fáth gur chinntigh mé gur di is ceart a bheith ann sa bhfoclóir. Mholfainn duit sin a dhéanamh tú fhéin.

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Phil (159.134.209.52 - 159.134.209.52)
Posted on Saturday, March 29, 2003 - 03:12 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá an ceart agatsa. Dúirt mo mhúinteoir na Gaeilge liom gurbh é 'dí'. B'fhéidir go litrítear é sa dá chaoi. An ndeir tusa é mar "dí" leis an fuaim 'í', nó an ndeir tú é sa chaoi chéanna ina ndeir tú 'di'?

Bhuel, ar aon chaoi, is 'í' an fuaim a ndeirtear agus mar sin, 'í' is ceart a scríobh.

Is fuath liom litrithe neamhrialta, tá siad dúr.

-Phil

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Aonghus (159.134.59.86 - 159.134.59.86)
Posted on Saturday, March 29, 2003 - 05:00 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá an dá fuaim sa chaint do "di" sa chiall "Bhain mé di é"
Tá litriú na Gaeilge (an Caighdeán) casta toisc go bhfuil an trí canúint ann, agus go ndearna siad iarracht a cheart a thabhairt do gach ceann acu.

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Phil (159.134.209.5 - 159.134.209.5)
Posted on Sunday, March 30, 2003 - 09:53 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Fós a litreoidh mise é mar "dí".

-Phil

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