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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (January-June) » Salutation to close a letter « Previous Next »

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Paul (66.152.218.225 - 66.152.218.225)
Posted on Wednesday, March 26, 2003 - 03:50 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A chairde,
For an informal closing to a letter,
is "Le gach dea-guí" appropriate?
Go raibh maith agaibh.
Paul

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Phil (159.134.209.75 - 159.134.209.75)
Posted on Wednesday, March 26, 2003 - 04:46 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Slán,

Is mise,

do chara,

Pól

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Méabh (159.134.74.208 - 159.134.74.208)
Posted on Wednesday, March 26, 2003 - 07:47 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi Paul. Im from Ireland&heres a few ways to end a letter informally................
Slán go fóill,Pól
Is mise Do bhuanchara,Pól (im your forever friend)
Do ghrá geal,Pól
Le grá ,Pól

hope they are of some help to you!!
Is mise le meas, Méabh as Éire.

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Paul (66.152.218.225 - 66.152.218.225)
Posted on Thursday, March 27, 2003 - 09:14 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Go raibh maith agat,
a Mhéabh.
Paul

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Méabh (159.134.75.176 - 159.134.75.176)
Posted on Thursday, March 27, 2003 - 09:31 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá fáilte romhat! need anymore help ,give me a shout and il do my best!
Méabh

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Thursday, March 27, 2003 - 09:32 am:   Edit Post Print Post

"le gach deá ghuí" is frequently used where in English you would use "with compliments"

I usually sign off with "beir bua" or "beir bua is beannacht"

"beir bua" literally means "may you achieve victory", but is meant to mean good luck.

I've seen people (usually from Donegal) sign off with "Ádh mór"

"Slán", or "slán go fóill" are fairly common.

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Méabh (159.134.75.176 - 159.134.75.176)
Posted on Thursday, March 27, 2003 - 09:36 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Hey aonghus,Are you from Ireland?

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Aonghus (159.134.59.116 - 159.134.59.116)
Posted on Thursday, March 27, 2003 - 03:56 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Sea. Is jaicín a tógadh le Gaeilge mé

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Phil (159.134.209.77 - 159.134.209.77)
Posted on Thursday, March 27, 2003 - 04:59 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

You know how nowadays everyone speaks English, and there's a few families that speak Gaeilge in their houses; I presume this is your situation Aonghus, yeah? ; Well is it confusing for a child growing up hearing two languages at the same time? Do they get mixed up and use one word from this language and another from the other?

I'd say it somehow gives you a greater ability at learning languages and stuff like that.

And BTW Aonghus, seeing as your perfectly fluent in both languages, which is better and how better?

My guess is English by a mile.

I myself am interested in learning an equatorial language, maybe Spanish or Portugese.

-Phil

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Phil (159.134.209.77 - 159.134.209.77)
Posted on Thursday, March 27, 2003 - 05:03 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

DAMN DAMN DAMN DAMN DAMN

SHOULD HAVE WRITTEN:

My guess is Gaeilge by a mile.

Again, my apologies and

DAMN

-Phil

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Friday, March 28, 2003 - 04:06 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Speaking for myself, and for my children who are growing up speaking German and Irish:

Children are perfectly able to distinguish between languages after about the age of three.

Of course they will sometimes use words from one language speaking in the other if they happen not to know the word they want in the language they are speaking. Also, I find my children sometimes use German or Irish syntax when they are speaking English which they are starting to learn now (We lived in Germany up until a few years ago). But this sorts itself out fairly quickly.

As to which language is better, I don't think in those terms. I speak English, German and Irish on a daily basis. I find there are ideas that I can express better in one or other of the languages, but the principal strength from my point of view is that speaking a range of languages exposes me to a range of ideas.

Remember that, in worldwide terms, only speaking one language is the exception, not the rule. 60% of Europeans are fluent in more than one language.

Speaking Irish is an important part of my identity, but I don't have any particular disregard of English - it a useful language for international work, which almost everybody nowadays is exposed to.

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Méabh (159.134.74.58 - 159.134.74.58)
Posted on Friday, March 28, 2003 - 07:16 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Aonghus, Are you from Dublin or Kerry? I know I should Know being from Ireland, but Dubs are known as The jacks after they won An All Ireland some years back. Do you know of many Gaelic football teams over there,just interested to know as I am a mad Gaelic Football supporter!!! Did you hear anything about the All-Stars match that went ahead last month over there,nothing was said at all over here!!

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Friday, March 28, 2003 - 10:19 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Is Bléa Cliathach é jaicín (nó Jackeen) i gconaí.
Agus tá conaí orm anois i mBrí Chualann. Ní dóigh liom gurbh é sin a bhí i gceist agat le "over there", ab ea?

Is beag suim atá agam i gCLG,áfach

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Méabh (159.134.75.121 - 159.134.75.121)
Posted on Saturday, March 29, 2003 - 03:33 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

tá brón orm ach cá bhfuil "Brí Chualann" ? An bhfuil sé in Éirinn nó cén áit? sorry although im from Ireland my Irish im ashamed to say isnt the very best!!

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Aonghus (159.134.59.86 - 159.134.59.86)
Posted on Saturday, March 29, 2003 - 04:56 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Brí Chualann = Bray, Co Wicklow

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Méabh (159.134.75.246 - 159.134.75.246)
Posted on Saturday, March 29, 2003 - 07:00 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

OH my god would you believe i never heard of that even though i often go there!! well you learn something new everyday! I thought everyone on this site was american,so i thought you lived in america but were from Ireland!!

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odriscoll (142.166.239.110 - 142.166.239.110)
Posted on Saturday, March 29, 2003 - 11:20 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Phil: I'm new to this site but not new to more than one language at once. Bringing my children up in the only officially bilingual province of Canada, they attended French immersion schools and had no problem with mixing the words up.(That is to say - they did not mix the words up. This grammatical thing is tricky no matter what language!) However, I did find that since they did most of their writing in french, I often had to correct their english grammar as they would frequently frame their sentences in english "backwards". Unfortunately this did not improve until they were in university where all of their writing was in english.

- Marilyn

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