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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (January-June) » Tír Chonaill vs Dún na nGall « Previous Next »

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Siobhán (195.93.34.13 - 195.93.34.13)
Posted on Saturday, March 15, 2003 - 07:11 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Can anyone tell me when and why Tír Chonaill became Dún na nGall? Tried asking a donegal man some time ago (a native speaker of Gaeilge) and he wasn't sure!

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Phil (159.134.209.155 - 159.134.209.155)
Posted on Sunday, March 16, 2003 - 07:49 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I don't know. But:

Tír Chonaill = Conaill's Land
Dún na nGall = Fort of the Englishman

A good guess would be that it was originaly "Tír Chonaill" and was changed to "Dún na nGall" when the English came.
I think the word "Gall" is intended to be offensive to the english because it also translates to "Foreigner", and "Fort of the Foreigner" doesn't sound too friendly.

Any more thoughts?

-Phil

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Siobhan (195.93.34.13 - 195.93.34.13)
Posted on Sunday, March 16, 2003 - 06:42 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Phil, A chara,

Totally correct in relation to the name, but the name was originally to the toen Donegal, being the original Fort of the Foreigners, however the County name didn't change until quite recently.
I still don't know how or why?
If you can help in any way it would be appreciated.

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Phil (159.134.209.198 - 159.134.209.198)
Posted on Tuesday, March 18, 2003 - 02:34 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I just thought of another possible origin of "Dún na nGall". There's a place in Switzerland called St. Gallen, named after the saint, Gall. Perhaps it's "The Fort of Gall", whoever the person was.

-Phil

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 06:27 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Found this while searching:-
http://scripts.ireland.com/ancestor/browse/counties/ulster/index_do.htm

"In early historical times, the area was part of the kingdom of Aileach founded by Conall and Eoghan, the two sons of the semi-legendary Niall of the Nine Hostages. Eoghan took what is now Tyrone (Tír Eoghain, "Eoghan's land") and the Inishowen peninsula, now in Donegal, while Conall took the remainder of the modern county, which became Tír Chonaill, "Conall's land". The name Donegal was taken from the town when the modern county was created by the English administration in 1585. "

The Gall refered to are Vikings, rather than the English - the Irish were caught hopping by the Vikings coming "aniar aduaidh" - from the North West. "Tháinig sé aniar aduaidh orm" is still a proverbial way of saying caught out, surprised
by something.

You should also note that people will still use Tír Chonaill to say where they come from. The county names really only began to be used when the GAA organised on the basis of the English civil counties.

And even now people from a Gaeltacht are more likely to associate themselves with the historical names of the place rather than the county. e.g. Corca Dhuibhne, rather than Kerry etc.

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Siobhan (195.93.34.13 - 195.93.34.13)
Posted on Friday, March 21, 2003 - 07:49 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Aonghus,
Thanks for the link. Some interesting info there.
Slán
Siobhán

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Friday, March 21, 2003 - 09:01 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Fáilte romhat
Aonghus

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