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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (January-June) » Pronunciation of Cead mile failte? « Previous Next »

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gillian dalaigh (24.62.114.239 - 24.62.114.239)
Posted on Friday, March 14, 2003 - 07:12 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I am going to start irish language classes in three months, and I just need something to tide me over until then ;-)

Could someone give me the pronunciation of céad míle fáilte?

Thanks,
Gillian

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Friday, March 14, 2003 - 07:59 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi gillian,

There's a recording of it here:

http://www.irishgaelictranslator.com/phrases/phrases.php?browse=2

Slán,

Oliver.

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gillian dalaigh (24.62.114.239 - 24.62.114.239)
Posted on Friday, March 14, 2003 - 08:30 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thanks for that site, it was very helpful. He says it as Céad míle fáilte romhat. What does romhat mean? how does it change the phrase, I've never seen it written as such.

thanks
gillian

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James (209.48.182.219 - 209.48.182.219)
Posted on Friday, March 14, 2003 - 08:54 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Romhat is an example of the unique creature in Irish called the prepositional pronoun. In this case Roimh (before) and Tú (you) are combined to give you Romhat meaning "before you."

Before, as in front of, not preceding something. The literal translation would be "A Hundred Thousand Welcomes Before You (in front of you)."

There are many other examples of the prepositional pronoun that the beginning student will encounter. Mar sampla:

Dia Duit (God to you = "Hello") Do (to) + tú = Duit

Séamus is ainm dom (James is a name to me = My name is James) Do + mé = Dom

Pádraig ata orm (Patrick is on me = Patrick is my name) Ar (on) + mé = orm.

That's just an intro but you can see how the prepositional pronoun is un-escapable when learning Irish. For a rather comprehensive list, go the the home page and click on "grammar" in the margin to the left. There's a real nice table that lays it out in a very user friendly fashion.

Le meas,

James

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Pádraig Mac G. (63.175.172.119 - 63.175.172.119)
Posted on Friday, March 14, 2003 - 08:58 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Gillian,

Romhat, from the preposition roimh means "before or in front of you." If I remember correctly, "fáilte" has its source in the idea of rejoicing. So, when I welcome you, "I rejoice before you."

James, Maith thú!

Oliver, Maith thú!

Also Oliver,

What accent is that at http://www.irishgaelictranslator.com/phrases/phrases.php?browse=2 ? The recording is clear and crisp. Is that the quality of the recording or the nature of the dialect?

Slán,

Pádraig

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Maidgc Ó G. (24.51.174.94 - 24.51.174.94)
Posted on Friday, March 14, 2003 - 09:21 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Phádraig, a chara,
I enjoyed the sound of those recordings myself and am wondering the same thing. So I posted a querie on his "contact me" board asking him just that. I hope to get a reply soon.
Also, I personally thought that not only was the quality of the recordings excellent, but also the consistancy achieved by using the same speaker.
Slán,
Maidhc.

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Friday, March 14, 2003 - 09:24 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi Pádraig,

That guy, Eoin is a Dub, so he's not a native speaker, although he speaks Irish sa teach lena chlann.

I usually hate the Dublin pronunciation cos they pronounce "isteach" as "ischock". Still, even he can't mess up 100,000 fáilte. :-)

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Pádraig MacG. (63.175.172.119 - 63.175.172.119)
Posted on Friday, March 14, 2003 - 09:35 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Oliver,

In the States the word "dub" refers to the electronic process by which a voice is inserted over or in place of another in a sound track. Is that what you mean? Or does the capital D indicate that this is short for Dubliner? If so, what disqualifies Dubliners from being native speakers? "sa teach lena chlann?" At home with the kids?

P.

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Pádraig (63.175.172.119 - 63.175.172.119)
Posted on Friday, March 14, 2003 - 09:46 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

P.S, Oliver:

He's saying fol teh. I'm afraid I've become attached to that NorWestern Fawl Cha. It has a meat-and-potatoes-really-get-your-teeth-into sound that makes you really feel welcome. The way you do in these parts when they don't set the dogs on you.

P.

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James (209.48.182.219 - 209.48.182.219)
Posted on Friday, March 14, 2003 - 09:47 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Phadraig,

I believe the reference to "not a native speaker" is due to the lack of a gaeltacht in the north. Actually, I've heard that one has been established in the north but I can't speak to when or how effective.

Mar sampla: No matter how proficient I might become in this language I will never be a native speaker. It may eventually become a second language for me but I'll never be able to call myself a true "native speaker." I suspect that the fluent speakers in the north would fall into that category as opposed to a resident of Ballyferriter, for example, who very probably grew up speaking Irish and later learning english.

Just my thoughts.

Le meas,

James

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siobhán (195.93.34.13 - 195.93.34.13)
Posted on Saturday, March 15, 2003 - 01:35 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

James,
Of course there is a gaeltacht in the North, in Donegal(Dún na nGall).That's about as far North as you can get!OK, technically it is part of the Republic, but it is still in cúige Úladh.
Many of us Northerners spent our Summers there and enjoyed the experience very much!

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