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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (January-June) » Translation please. « Previous Next »

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Fitzsimmons (12.241.205.135 - 12.241.205.135)
Posted on Wednesday, March 05, 2003 - 11:03 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I am of Irish desent, I am looking for the translation of the phrase "I am of Ireland".
I am also looking for a "class/course"in the Pacific Northwest so that I may learn this wonderful language.

Can anybody help?
Jay

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Pádraig Mac G. (63.161.61.49 - 63.161.61.49)
Posted on Wednesday, March 05, 2003 - 11:16 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Is mise Éireann -- literally "I (emphatic) am of Ireland."

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Colleen (66.26.166.132 - 66.26.166.132)
Posted on Wednesday, March 05, 2003 - 11:34 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

i need to translate "I love you" into Irish-HELP!!

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Anton Pavolich Karamazov (205.244.12.227 - 205.244.12.227)
Posted on Thursday, March 06, 2003 - 12:36 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá grá agam dhuit.

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Fitzsimmons (12.241.205.135 - 12.241.205.135)
Posted on Thursday, March 06, 2003 - 12:42 am:   Edit Post Print Post

if "Is mise Éireann" is "I am of Ireland" than what is "is as Éirinn mise"?

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Pádraig (205.244.12.227 - 205.244.12.227)
Posted on Thursday, March 06, 2003 - 01:29 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I'm not sure.
Éireann is the genitive "of Ireland."
Éirinn is the dative "in Ireland."

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Thursday, March 06, 2003 - 04:04 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Sorry Pádraig but if you said Is mise Éireann to me, I'd think you were claiming to be Ireland.

I am of Irish descent would be
"Is de bhunadh na hÉireann mise"

"is as Éirinn mise" means I am from Ireland

But keep it simple Jay: "Is Gael mé"

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Pádraig Mac G. (205.244.12.97 - 205.244.12.97)
Posted on Thursday, March 06, 2003 - 07:36 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A Aonghus agus A Chairde,

This is not intended as argument but in the spirit of inquiry.

Does not "is mise Éireann" literally mean I am of Ireland?

I take that phrase in English to imply more than I am Irish, or I am of Irish descent. In fact it sounds somewhat self-conscious unless one means something like Ireland is part of me and I of Ireland. When I saw the phrase, I simply tried to literally convert it to Irish. Of course literal translations though faithful, often lose their poetry.

Buíochas
P.

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Thursday, March 06, 2003 - 08:58 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Not being a grammar guru, I'm not sure what the answer would be.
"is mise Éireann" just sounds wrong

To say "I am of Ireland" I would probably say
"Is de Éireann mé"

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Roberta (64.12.96.234 - 64.12.96.234)
Posted on Monday, March 10, 2003 - 10:30 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Please excuse my ignorance, but how does one pronounce "Deorai" in English? I am having a "debate" with my German language friends.

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.178 - 193.122.47.178)
Posted on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - 04:08 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Roberta,
I would pronounce it "JOE-ree" with the stress on the first syllable.
I don't think you're ignorant, you said "please". :-)

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Phil (159.134.209.7 - 159.134.209.7)
Posted on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - 02:46 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

OF
--

If something is of me, then I own the thing, I posess it.

John's bag
The bag of John

Although the second sounds gay, both sentences mean exactly the same thing. It's the ludicris grammar of the English "language" that confuses people.

Scéal Sheáin

Seán's story
The story of Seán

Same thing.

Is liomsa an peann.

I own the pen = the pen is of me.

So, I am of Ireland. Best translation I can think of is:

Is le Éire mise.

Ireland owns me. I'm of Ireland.

As for, Is mé Éireann. Although I've said I am no expert of Gaeilge, I have been learning it for 8 or so years in school. And that doesn't look right or sound right and it probably doesn't smell right either. An "of word", eg. buachalla Éireann eolais, is always accompanied by the noun that posesses it.

Best way to associate yourself with Ireland:

Is as Éire dom.

I've seen "as Éire" loads of times but never seen "as Éirinn". Can't explain it. Although I do use "Éirinn" with all other prepositions.

Don't even get me started on "Is de Éireann mé". "Éireann" means "OF Ireland", so what the hell is "de" doing there. First thing, change "Éireann" to "Éire". Then use the right verb:

"Táimse d'Éire".

--

"I love you"

Is grá liomsa thusa.

Tá grá agamsa ortsa. (Preferred)
or
Tá grá agamsa duitse.

--

-Phil

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Aonghus (159.134.59.82 - 159.134.59.82)
Posted on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - 04:02 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Phil, a chara
Éireann does not mean of Ireland, it is the genitive of Éire.

I suggest you look up de in Ó Donaill

The second meaning is Origin, Derivation
I stand over
"Is de Éireann mé"

One of the examples given in Ó Donaill is
Bean de Ghearaltach, a Fitzgerald lady.

I might mention that although I'm not from a Gaeltacht, I've spoken Irish all my life.

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alec1 (62.254.104.113 - 62.254.104.113)
Posted on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - 05:16 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Pearse wrote

Mise Éire, is sine mé ná an Cailleach Beara.

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Just Curious (205.244.12.94 - 205.244.12.94)
Posted on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - 05:51 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Chairde,

Not being native Irish, I'm not up to speed on the time frame. Is Irish still a required subject? For how many years is it required? At what age does the study usually begin? I'm trying to estimate the age of a person who had been at it for all of 8 years.

Also, how many years of study are required for one to become an engineer?

Just curious.

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Wednesday, March 12, 2003 - 04:05 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Mise Éire, is sine mé ná an Cailleach Beara.

means

I am Ireland, I am older than the witch of Beara

School starts with junior infants, age ca 4 and continues to leaving cert at age ca 18 - 14 years in all, for which Irish is compulsory.

An engineering degree takes 4 years

And I took mine 13 years ago...so whip out the calculator, Just curious.

beir bua

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Brian Glasenapp (12.33.168.194 - 12.33.168.194)
Posted on Wednesday, March 12, 2003 - 05:36 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

And what is "Happy St. Patrick's Day" in Irish? Go raibh maith agat!

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Maidhc Ó G (68.168.82.43 - 68.168.82.43)
Posted on Wednesday, March 12, 2003 - 06:35 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Bhrían, a chara,
LÁ FHÉILE PÁDRAIG SONA!
Slán,
Maidhc.

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Thursday, March 13, 2003 - 05:39 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Go mba hé daoibh go leir!


Aonghus

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Brian (12.33.168.194 - 12.33.168.194)
Posted on Thursday, March 13, 2003 - 10:56 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A Mhaidhc,
Tá tú go hiontach.
Buíochas,
Brian

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Roberta (64.12.96.234 - 64.12.96.234)
Posted on Thursday, March 13, 2003 - 03:14 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Oliver,
Thank you.

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Maidhc Ó G (24.51.175.191 - 24.51.175.191)
Posted on Thursday, March 13, 2003 - 04:15 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Bhrían, a chara,
Tá fáilte romhat.

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Phil (159.134.209.109 - 159.134.209.109)
Posted on Thursday, March 13, 2003 - 04:49 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Éireann = genitive of Éire.

Suprise suprise, genetive = of.

"Is de Éireann mé" is the biggest load of shite I've ever seen.

de == of

but it's not posessive.

A picture of a boy

pictiúr de bhuachaill

because the boy doesn't own the picture.

--

pictiúr buachalla

The boy owns the picture. It doesn't say what the picture is of

--

I suggest you think of "de" as just another preposition. Although it translates to "of" in English, it is a totally different word to the possessive "of".

-Phil

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Just Curious (205.244.12.235 - 205.244.12.235)
Posted on Thursday, March 13, 2003 - 06:14 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Can anyone tell what this senternce says in English?

Tá díomassach agus dimheas aige.

Just curious.

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Thursday, March 13, 2003 - 07:51 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi JC,
I think it means:

"He has scorn and contempt".
Or "scorn and dislike".
It's not a full sentence though.

Slan,

Oliver.

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Pádraig (205.244.12.95 - 205.244.12.95)
Posted on Thursday, March 13, 2003 - 09:18 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá díomassach agus dimheas aige.

Hey, Oliver as Mhaigh Eo, chí Dia sinn,

I think that might be a sentence with a couple changes. Díomassach is misspelled. Take out an s and you have díomasach = arrogant. But you can't have arrogant at you. You have to have arrogance at you = díomas.

Sooo, if one says tá díomas aige = arrogance is at him = he is arrogant. I think the other word means disrespect. Whoever he is, don't invite him.

What do you think?

P.

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.170 - 193.122.47.170)
Posted on Friday, March 14, 2003 - 12:31 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Yu da man with the dictionary.

so the phrase would be:

"He has arrogance and disrespect".

Doesn't sound too good.

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jeanpaul (63.164.145.161 - 63.164.145.161)
Posted on Friday, March 14, 2003 - 03:36 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

how do you say happy birthday in Gaeilc

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Friday, March 14, 2003 - 07:44 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Breithlá sona duit......

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