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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (January-June) » How do you say? « Previous Next »

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Bill Travers (64.132.97.17 - 64.132.97.17)
Posted on Monday, March 03, 2003 - 02:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

My wife gave me a claddagh as an engagement ring some 12 years ago.
She wanted to have the words "My Forever Love" inscribed on the inside but never did.
I would like to have the inscription added in Gaelic. Can you translate for me?

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Aonghus (159.134.58.127 - 159.134.58.127)
Posted on Monday, March 03, 2003 - 03:33 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Mo ghrá go deo

or

Mo ghrá síoraí

or

Mo ghrá buan

Grá is love, mo ghrá my love, and go deo, síoraí and buan are ways of saying forever. But you can't change the order as easily as you could in english!

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Liam (64.132.97.17 - 64.132.97.17)
Posted on Monday, March 03, 2003 - 05:07 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Aonghus,
Thanks so much for the translation. I kind of like the "My Love Forever". Which version is more in keeping with never ending, eternity?
Liam

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Pádraig Mac G. (205.244.12.64 - 205.244.12.64)
Posted on Monday, March 03, 2003 - 06:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Liam,

Foclóir Póca (English to Irish) gives síoraí for everlasting. In the English expression you asked about 'forever' placed in front of love appears to be an adjective. (My forever 'kind of' love.) It has a nice, poetic feeling in English.

That would be "Mo ghrá síoraí."

On the other hand, if you intend (My love 'that lasts' for ever) I believe the construction is:

"Mo ghrá go síoraí."

Slán,
P.

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Liam (64.132.97.17 - 64.132.97.17)
Posted on Tuesday, March 04, 2003 - 12:40 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Pádraig,
Now you have gone and done it!
I now have to ask my céile what kind of love does she have after all these years!
Just kidding. Go raibh maith agat.

Slán go fóill.
Liam

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Aonghus (159.134.58.166 - 159.134.58.166)
Posted on Tuesday, March 04, 2003 - 03:25 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

There is nothing in particular to pick between them in terms of everlastingness....

They are all eternal, never ending
from
http://www.csis.ul.ie/focloir/ (Irish Irish dictionary)

buan [aidiacht den chéad díochlaonadh]
a mhaireann, a sheasann, nach n-athraíonn choíche.

síoraí [aidiacht den tríú díochlaonadh]
síor, gan chríoch (an bheatha shíoraí).

deo [ainmfhocal ]
go deo ((in abairt) go deireadh an tsaoil, go brách; ar fad (an-fhuar go deo)).

Pádraig, síoraí is an adjective, so it would be
"mo ghrá síoraí" for my forever kind of love

My love 'that lasts' for ever would be
"mo ghrá de shíor"

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logan marsh (64.12.96.234 - 64.12.96.234)
Posted on Tuesday, March 04, 2003 - 08:31 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

in the name of the father the wholy spirit Amen

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Pádraig (205.244.12.176 - 205.244.12.176)
Posted on Tuesday, March 04, 2003 - 10:49 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I'm not sure what to make of that last post, but if this is what you're reaching for, bain sult as.

In ainm an Athar agus an Mhic agus an Spioraid Naoimh. Amen.



Glóir don Athair agus don Mhac agus don Spiorad Naomh, Amen.

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Liam T (64.132.97.17 - 64.132.97.17)
Posted on Thursday, March 06, 2003 - 03:30 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

"Mo ghrá síoraí."
Ok Ya’ll. I am struggling on this one.
How do you pronounce this phonetically?

Slán go fóill.
Liam

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P. (205.244.12.169 - 205.244.12.169)
Posted on Thursday, March 06, 2003 - 05:20 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Mo ghrá síoraí = Moe graw shee rhee

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Liam (64.132.97.17 - 64.132.97.17)
Posted on Thursday, March 06, 2003 - 05:41 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Go raibh maith agat P,
The last word was killing me.
I have just started learning. Two weeks!

Slán go fóill.
Liam

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Pádraig Mac Gafraidh (63.161.61.111 - 63.161.61.111)
Posted on Thursday, March 06, 2003 - 06:29 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

http://www.bbc.co.uk/northernireland/blas/learners/index.shtml

A Liam, A Chara,

Been there; done that; even bought the tee shirt. I've discovered there's absolutely no substitute for having someone speak the language for us at this early stage. Nothing ever seems to sound the way I imagined it would. If you haven't found it yet, check out a program called Giota Beag at the above link. Even if you don't work the lessons, it's a good way to hear some basic, conversational Irish spoken by natives.

Slán agus beannachtaí,

Pádraig Mac.G.

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Marcia (208.61.31.47 - 208.61.31.47)
Posted on Thursday, March 06, 2003 - 08:08 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

This was my attempt:

Mo ghrá síoraí =Mow grah she-o-ray

Irish(Gaeilge)female name: Siobhan = She-o-van

Although, that 'she' sounds like a soft 'gee-o' at times.

Buíochas, a chairde.

Thanks for the link, Pádraig. Somehow, it gets easier to understand.

Marcia

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.170 - 193.122.47.170)
Posted on Thursday, March 06, 2003 - 10:41 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi Marcia,

Good to see you feel you're making progress!
Siobhán is pronounced: SHIVAWN

Slán,

Oliver.

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Liam (64.132.97.17 - 64.132.97.17)
Posted on Friday, March 07, 2003 - 09:20 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Pádraig Mac.G
Thank you!
Someone had given me that link. It may have been you when I fist found this site two weeks ago. I was so mad at myself for loosing it!

Go raibh maith agat to everyone for making this what it is. Very Friendly!

Slán,
Liam

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Pádraig Mac G. (205.244.12.136 - 205.244.12.136)
Posted on Friday, March 07, 2003 - 10:45 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A Liam, A Chara,

Go ndéana a a mhaith dhuit.
You're welcome ( May it do good to you. )

Just one warning about something which will probably become obvious in time. The Blas link strongly favors Ulster pronunciations which tend to be glaringly distinct from the southern dialects. I have a daughter who spent the summer in Donegal, and until I discovered Ulster, she and I continually argued over phonics. Now I can't shake that Katzenjammer accent and it's even creeping into my English -- just uh luht hul but.

Bain sult as,
Pádraig

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Liam (64.132.97.17 - 64.132.97.17)
Posted on Friday, March 07, 2003 - 01:27 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Pádraig,
Fortunately my clan is from County Mayo, across the sound from Achill Island. Maybe far enough north that I will not catch too much grief when I visit.

If I may ask, I noticed you put A in front of your greeting. Can you explain that to me?

Slán go fóill.
Liam

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Pádraig Mac G. (63.175.172.71 - 63.175.172.71)
Posted on Friday, March 07, 2003 - 08:12 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Liam, A Chara,

Among its many uses, the particle A is used to indicate that the person identified is being spoken to directly. It's called the vocative case of the noun. With most names (Liam is an exception) the first letter of the name is aspirated, and in some names the letter i is also inserted into the final syllable.

Examples: Pádraig becomes A Phádraig
Cara becomes A Chara
Seán becomes A Sheáin

So many rules. But if we were two year olds living in the Gaeltacht, by now we would know that our mothers were calling when they said A Liam or A Phádraig, and the other times they spoke our names they were talking about us. Having learned that as infants, we wouldn't need all those rules now.

Slán,
Pádraig

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Friday, March 07, 2003 - 08:15 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

"it's even creeping into my English -- just uh luht hul but."


An greannmhar ar fad a Phádraig!
Bhain tú gáire asam. Tuigim go cruinn an chaoi go bhfuil an blas sin fíor thógálach.

That was very funny Pádraig! It got a laugh from me. I understand exactly how infectious that accent is.

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Pádraig Mac G. (63.161.61.71 - 63.161.61.71)
Posted on Saturday, March 08, 2003 - 06:57 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

By Liam (64.132.97.17 - 64.132.97.17) on Friday, March 07, 2003 - 01:27 pm:

A Pádraig,
Fortunately my clan is from County Mayo, across the sound from Achill Island. Maybe far enough north that I will not catch too much grief when I visit

Tá muid as Mhaigh Eo -- chí Dia sinn.

Small world, A Liam,

My gradfather, who emigrated from County Mayo when he was 12 years old (at least that's how old the boys at Ellis Island reckoned him to be)seemed never able to speak the first part of that phrase without adding the second. There was a time when I thought God-help-us was a place name.
Like Altoona, Pennsylvania.

Well, HIS name was Pádraig and he chose March 17 as a likely birthday.

Slán,
Pádraig

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Saturday, March 08, 2003 - 08:35 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I'm from Mayo too!

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Saturday, March 08, 2003 - 08:37 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá muid as Mhaigh Eo -- chí Dia sinn

Sorry, pressed post too soon, waht does the "chí" part mean? "Help" I presume, but is it short ofr something?

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Pádraig Mac G. (205.244.12.136 - 205.244.12.136)
Posted on Saturday, March 08, 2003 - 09:36 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hello, Oliver:

You're asking ME?!

I believe the chí Dia sinn is an abrupt and emphatic way of saying "God help us." Every Irish/American I have ever heard give the response in English used those words. In conversation the "God-help-us" always has an inevitable matter-of-factness about it as though being from Mayo automatically put one in the direst need of God's aid. I was told that the expression sprang from the extreme poverty in the area.

The alternate expression which I prefer is "Go bhfóire Dia orainn."

Now, back to Seanathair Mac Gafraidh, and here I go out on a limb:

Chí is a variant form of the verb feic. Farther out on the limb I believe it is an imperative form. Don't ask me to explain how or why. Apparently persons in distress may be prompted to exclaim "God, look at us!"

Now, perched on my limb, I'll await the confirmation or denial of those more erudite than I.

You're asking ME? Really?

Sheesh!

Do chara,
Pádraig

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Pádraig (205.244.12.215 - 205.244.12.215)
Posted on Sunday, March 09, 2003 - 05:43 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Chairde,

Well, as I wait for that confirmation or denial (20 hours and counting) I thought I'd explore the possibility that there might be some others out there that hail from Mhaigh Eo that might check in. Just fur the craic uv ut.

I'm told that if you travel north along Clew Bay out of Westport and toward Newport then west along the bay to Mulraney, you'll not be far from Ballycroy and that a little beyond that is a place called Srahnamanragh which is small enough to throw a stone across. There, I'm told is the last place my grandfather called home before he set foot in America.

Anyone from Mayo?

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Pádraig Mac G. (205.244.12.64 - 205.244.12.64)
Posted on Sunday, March 09, 2003 - 08:36 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Chairde,

Boy this is like being the last kid on the playground and wondering how come Mom didn't call me when all the others were called. Well, it does give me a chance to practice my jump shot.

In an earlier post I suggested that "chí" may be an imperative form. It ain't. It is, however, a variant of "feic" and it is in the present tense.
Improvising with what I thought it might be, I translated it as "look." The correct translation would be "see."

Pádraig

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Sunday, March 09, 2003 - 08:59 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

GRMA, a Phádraig.
They use "chífidh" in Donegal too. They say that the Irish of North Mayo is closer to the Ulster dialect than to Connemara.

I've never heard of Srahnamanragh before, although I read the Western People quite often.

I'd guess in Irish it would be:

"Sraith na ????????" A sraith is a stretch of barren heathery moorland, as far as I know, not that you'd see much of that in Mayo, chí Dia sinn.

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Liam (64.132.97.17 - 64.132.97.17)
Posted on Monday, March 10, 2003 - 10:31 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A Pádraig,
My mother was from Mayo. The exact location I am not sure. As I remember it was south on the Achill Sound. She took me back there when I was a young boy. I have never been back. I remember looking out of the house and over the sound at the island. It seemed like you could walk to the island on the low tide. Mom was a Corrigan on both sides. The Coonies (-1 sp) lived next door. Mom's sister married a Masterson who now runs the farm. I believe they were Gallagher’s that lived across the street. I will have to call my Mom tonight.

Slán,
Liam

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Liam (64.132.97.17 - 64.132.97.17)
Posted on Monday, March 10, 2003 - 12:25 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I am printing a program for the City of Raleigh,
21st St Patrick's Day Parade and Festival

The front cover of the program has the following:

Beannachtai na feile Padraig.

Are there any Fada missing?

Slán go fóill.
Liam

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Maidhc Ó G (24.51.174.165 - 24.51.174.165)
Posted on Monday, March 10, 2003 - 01:00 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Liam, a chara,
Beannachtaí na Fhéile Pádraig!
Slán,
Maidhc.

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Pádraig (205.244.12.117 - 205.244.12.117)
Posted on Monday, March 10, 2003 - 03:07 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I'd guess in Irish it would be:

"Sraith na ????????" A sraith is a stretch of barren heathery moorland

I found an advert for a driving tour that passes Srahnamanragh Bridge which appears to be located in the proximity of Ballycroy. Also discovered an index of place names which indicates the name means "river-meadow of the enclosures." I don't know if river is included in the "sraith" or if there's some remote derivation in the manragh. Seems a far cry from "abhainn." Perhaps manragh is drawn from "meán" which would explain the enclosures in the "middle" of which is an sraith.

Pádraig

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Liam (64.132.97.17 - 64.132.97.17)
Posted on Monday, March 10, 2003 - 04:34 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Pádraig,

I spoke to my mom and she said Srahnamanragh was right out her back door and to the left. I told here I could sort or remember that. Not to far. She also thought that Srahnamanragh was a strand of seaweed. They did a lot of collecting there of seaweed to make carrageen (-1 sp.)and use as fertilizer on the fields.

She asked what the family name was?

Liam

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Pádraig (63.161.61.73 - 63.161.61.73)
Posted on Monday, March 10, 2003 - 04:38 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Gafraidh

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - 07:03 am:   Edit Post Print Post

According to this link
Sragh is a river meadow
http://www.n-ireland.co.uk/genealogy/placenames/placenamess.htm

I'm curious now, I must look up some dictionaries when I get a chance

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Pádraig Mac G. (205.244.12.146 - 205.244.12.146)
Posted on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - 08:44 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Oh Aye, Aonghus,

That's the link I had stumbled upon. It also includes "of the enclosures or pounds." That expression is pretty much alien to American colloquy, but the image I get is of a paddock or large pen into which livestock could be driven.

Make sense?

Pádraig

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - 09:04 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I'm a city slicker.
Also, names are often based on older Irish forms which have gone out speech. I intend to check a couple of dictionaries.

But the link above gave Sragh on it's own as river meadow. I intend to try and find the Irish version of the name which may be easier to decipher, I have the list of postal towns at home, not sure if it's covered.

English versions are frequently so corrupted that it is difficult to recognise the Irish in them.

e.g. I grew up in Tír an Iúir (land of the yew) but the English is Terenure.

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Paul (66.152.218.225 - 66.152.218.225)
Posted on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - 09:17 am:   Edit Post Print Post

There are fishing pounds as well, a chairde: places where fish are caught and penned. There were pounds in the Atlantic Ocean off of Point Pleasant in New Jersey in the early 20th century. This might be a possible explanation of this placename.
Slán tamall, Paul

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Pádraig Mac G. (205.244.12.146 - 205.244.12.146)
Posted on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - 09:42 am:   Edit Post Print Post

a Phóil, A Chara,

Now there's a thought. Fish pounds in the river in the meadow. Perhaps someone from Ballycroy could drive out to Sraghnamanragh Bridge (if it's still there) and look at the place. I'd love to volunteer, but I'm trapped in the mountains of Carolina.

Pádraig

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Aonghus (159.134.59.82 - 159.134.59.82)
Posted on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - 03:50 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I believe I have it
Dineen gives
Srath (esp. in place names) a valley bottom, a holm, a fen or moor along a
river or lake, a river field , a bleaching place.

De Bhaldraithe gives Banrach for pound,
for which Dineen gives the alternative mannrach

I suggest the name is probably Srath na mBannrach

It's not a post office town, so it doesn't crop up in the list of names
I have, but I'm confident this is right.

beirigí bua

Aonghus

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Liam (64.132.97.17 - 64.132.97.17)
Posted on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - 06:50 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Pádraig A Maidhc,
You can't be trapped in the Blue Ridge they are too beautiful.
I am here in Raleighwood and can't get up there enough. Love the little town of Triplet.
Maidhc thanks for the fada information. You made me a hero on the St Patrick's Program.
Slán go fóill.
Liam

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James (65.179.40.233 - 65.179.40.233)
Posted on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - 08:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

OK--there's one in the Blue Ridge, one teaching at UNC-G, one living in Raleigh agus mo fhéin i mo chónaí i na Sandhills (just outside of Pinehurst). Looks like we've got the beginnings of a North Carolina Conradh Na Gaeilge. I've got four dedicated souls in my language group. That's a total of six. It would be incredible to get an immersion weekend without having to drive to New York. Or, it would be GREAT to travel to New York as a group. This has potential gentlemen, I mean REAL potential---interested in your thoughts.


Le meas,

James

By the way--my temper tantrum is over now. Can I come back and play?

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - 08:04 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Sár bhleachtaireacht déanta agat ansin, a Aonghuis.

I siad "sraith" because I heard my grandad use it to describe the land around Barr na Cúige (Knock Airport) when he couldn't think of an adequate English word.

As far as I know he was a native speaker but that's the only time I ever heard him say anything in Irish. Anyway, when I see Sraith in a placename now I think of a heathery wet moorland.

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James (65.179.40.233 - 65.179.40.233)
Posted on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - 08:06 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Make that a total of seven. Seems my math isn't on par today.

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Bradford (66.231.3.135 - 66.231.3.135)
Posted on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - 08:09 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A James,

Glad to see you're back, mo chara! I knew (or at least hoped) you couldn't resist the pull of Gaeilge for too long!

Unfortunately I live on the plains of South Dakota so I can't be part of your proposed group. But I still like the idea! :)

Slán,

Bradford

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James (65.179.40.233 - 65.179.40.233)
Posted on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - 08:18 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Friday night my language group met and my daughter (11 years old) was with me for the weekend. (Divorced Dad--the new american way--sad to say) She really took to the language. How in the hell can I let that opportunity pass?!?!? On Sunday, after I took her home to her Mom, I spent the whole ride listening to Sean Nos music from the Aran Islands. Then, just as I was pulling into the drive way the Irish Tenors drove the nail home with "The Fields of Athenry". How anyone can keep a dry eye listening to that song is beyond me. Anyway--the pull is too strong--this language touches me in a way no other has---I'm back, humbled, humored and happy.

Le meas,

James

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - 08:22 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

James,
Tá fáilte is fichid romhat. Shíl mé go raibh tú imithe go deo.

Is ait an mac é an saol!

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Pádraig (205.244.12.111 - 205.244.12.111)
Posted on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - 09:20 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Aonú, tá fáilte romhat, a Shéamus, a chara, although I suspect you've been here all the while, lurking in the shadows and watching until the inevitable pull of an Gaeilge finally gotcha.

Now, to all you Tar Heels out there, I'm in Cherokee County which is so far west that we can spit into Tennessee, (and frequently do) and from the time the first snow flies until the ice breaks up in the Nantahala, nobody comes here. We have to bribe Santa Claus (Father Christmas.)

Well, I did some rough mileage estimations, and it looks like Hickory is midway between Raleigh and here. Should there be a gatherin' those points would be a 3 to 4 hour drive depending how maniacal the person driving. From UNCG and for the quiet man in Pinehurst, the journey would be substantially shorter.

Perhaps something can be worked out.

Slán,
Pádraig Mac G.

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Pádraig Mac G. (205.244.12.111 - 205.244.12.111)
Posted on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - 09:34 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Oliver,

Is ait an mac é an saol! What does this mean?

Buíochas,
Páidraig

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Pádraig Mac G. (205.244.12.111 - 205.244.12.111)
Posted on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - 09:48 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I suggest the name is probably Srath na mBannrach

It's not a post office town, so it doesn't crop up in the list of names
I have, but I'm confident this is right.

beirigí bua

Aonghus

GRMA, Aonghus. You're a regular bulldog. Judging from the time of your post you went straight home and hit the books until you got it. I have a number of family members who couldn't pronounce Srahnamanagh last time they gathered. They'll be pleased to have this informatrion.

Buíochas arís,
Pádraig

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.170 - 193.122.47.170)
Posted on Wednesday, March 12, 2003 - 03:07 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Ooops, posted this on another thread!
-----------------------
Here ya go, a Phádraig.

http://www.daltai.com/proverbs/weeks/week81.htm

It means, "life is strange".

I stuck an "é" in there whereas the archive version doesn't. I always thought "Is" had to refer to an "é" or an "í" later in the sentence, but I think the noun "mac" does the job instead here.

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Wednesday, March 12, 2003 - 04:08 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Pádraig
an ceart iomlán agat.
It was 9 pm when I posted it my time.
I got the bug to decipher it.

Note that Srath and Sraith are two different (but probably related) words.

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Pádraig Mac G. (205.244.12.147 - 205.244.12.147)
Posted on Wednesday, March 12, 2003 - 08:35 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Oliver,
Is ait an mac an saol

Recipe for madness:

1. One missing fada from ait.
2. One disconnected é.
3. One literal translation of mac.
4. Total ignorance of metaphorical Irish.
5. Naive expectations.

Mix fada with ait until it broadens to áit.
Blend in other ingredients.
Bake in a concrete thinking brain all day.

Let cool and serve as:

"The position of the son is the life."

Run screaming into the night.

Also: I can't place it or lay my hands on the notes I recall making on it but I believe there is a rule of Irish grammar which nobody really worries about that says that "Is" must be followed by a personal pronoun (é) and that it functions as a "sub-predicate."

Is é Seán é. (It is Seán.) Why is the first é in there? I don't know. I've just seen it. Sub-predicate? Rules?

Slán,
Pádraig

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Ursulaamy (209.170.162.243 - 209.170.162.243)
Posted on Wednesday, March 12, 2003 - 05:07 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A chara James,

Sorry to hear the personal news, but glad the language group is doing well.


Le meas,

Ursula

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Wednesday, March 12, 2003 - 08:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Phádraig, LMAO!

What can I say except that the Gaelic world is "different".

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Pádraig Mac G. (205.244.12.164 - 205.244.12.164)
Posted on Wednesday, March 12, 2003 - 10:00 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

What can I say except that the Gaelic world is "different".

Okay, Oliver, you can say that. But can you say this?

An bhfuil cead agam dul go dtí an leithreas?

Pádraig

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Wednesday, March 12, 2003 - 10:37 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Many's the day I said that when I was a gasún.

Well, we had "an bhfuil cead agam dul amach?"

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