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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (January-June) » Irish in America or Canada « Previous Next »

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Seámus (159.134.136.173 - 159.134.136.173)
Posted on Friday, February 28, 2003 - 06:33 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I am a university student in Ireland studying the irish language and i would just love to say how overwhelming it is to see people with such a passion for the language. After i get my degree i would love to spend some time in America or Canada teaching some irish but i dont know how to go about this and i ahve little information. Therefore i would be grateful to anyone who could supply me with information,
go raibh míle maith agat!!

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Pádraig MacG. (63.161.61.102 - 63.161.61.102)
Posted on Friday, February 28, 2003 - 07:13 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Sheámuis, A Chara,

On another thread there has been an exchange with a young American who is looking at your question from the other side; that is, he wants to know how he can go about studying Irish in America. The thread is entitled "Is it difficult to teach yourself Irish?" You might enjoy reading it.

You do not say which degree you're working to complete. American universities generally don't employ instructors without Masters or Doctorates. However, there is a rapidly growing interest in Irish Studies programs in the States, and I would suggest you research what's available at various colleges and universities here.

Fáilte go Daltaí na Gaeilge. Tar isteach; druid an doras, agus suigh sios, a chara. There are quite a few of us here who are happy to see you. We have many questions to ask.

Slán leat,
Pádraig

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Friday, February 28, 2003 - 08:14 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

An mbeidh cupán tae agat? Ah, go on, go on, go on.

Séamas,

There's an article in the Feb edition of www.beo.ie on a new dept of Irish Studies in Notre Dame. Might as well start at the top!

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Pádraig Mac G. (63.175.172.79 - 63.175.172.79)
Posted on Friday, February 28, 2003 - 08:38 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dia dhuit, A Oliver,

I was going to challenge your assertion that Notre Dame was "starting at the top," wondering whether your preference was based upon the fact they are a Christian Brothers University or your alma mater, but I decided to compare the program with the one at Villanova.

You win.

Then I found the following advert on the N-D website. This is a fabulous opportunity for somebody. Once again, having fluent Irish should be a real leg-up on any competition. The deadline is past, but I assume such a fellowship would be more than a one time thing.

National Endowment for the Humanities
Keough Fellowship in Irish Studies University of Notre Dame

With the support of a National Endowment for the Humanities Challenge Grant, the Keough Institute for Irish Studies at the University of Notre Dame invites applications for its faculty fellowship program. The NEH Keough Fellowship will enable an outstanding scholar to continue his or her research while in residence in the Keough Institute during the academic year 2003-2004. The Fellowship is open to scholars in any area of Irish Studies. The stipend is $40,000.

The NEH Keough Fellow will participate in a periodic faculty seminar and present a paper on her or his research during the year. Apart from the seminar, the Fellow’s only obligation will be to pursue her or his research. The Fellow will be provided an office in the Keough Institute and will be integrated into the Institute’s life, with full library privileges and access to the Institute’s research tools.

Applicants should submit a double-spaced narrative of no more than five pages describing their proposed research, indicating how it builds on existing scholarship, and suggesting how it will benefit from broader interdisciplinary studies. Applicants should also submit a curriculum vitae and arrange for three letters of reference to be sent to the Keough Institute by 4 January 2003. Announcement of the successful candidate will be made in February 2003.

Please send applications to this address:

NEH Keough Fellowships
Keough Institute for Irish Studies
University of Notre Dame
422 Flanner Hall
Notre Dame, Indiana 46556

Nior mhaith cupán tae. Ba mhaith liom cáife, GRMA. Is that "go on go on go on" inspired by the housekeeper on Father Ted?

Pádraig

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Michael Noonan (209.246.98.27 - 209.246.98.27)
Posted on Friday, February 28, 2003 - 10:12 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dia dhuit Seamus
Be sure to check out Fordham University's Institute of Irish Studies
http://www.fordham.edu/current/Undergraduate/Institute_of_Irish_S7593.html
Michil

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Seámus (159.134.137.18 - 159.134.137.18)
Posted on Saturday, March 01, 2003 - 10:35 am:   Edit Post Print Post

dia dhuit,
thanks for the messages, i am doing a B.A in Gaeilge

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Jen (63.100.108.19 - 63.100.108.19)
Posted on Monday, March 03, 2003 - 10:11 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Pádraig, A Chara,

How do you like Father Ted? I'd really like to see it, but I would have to get digital cable, in order to get BBC America. This wouldn't be entirely bad however, as I have been looking for an "excuse" to get digital cable for quite some time.

Slán,
Jen

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Pádraig Mac G. (205.244.12.78 - 205.244.12.78)
Posted on Monday, March 03, 2003 - 01:03 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hello, Jen,

I love situation comedies and especially those we call "Brit-coms" in the States, yet I was surprised to find myself becoming bored by Father Ted after half a dozen episodes.

Oliver G. has observed that the show is almost Monty Pythonesque, and thinking back there may be something to that. However, the comparison had never occurred to me, and I would say the reason is that Father Ted runs a very distant second to Python. Rather like Roman comedy to Aristophanes.

Fr. Ted relies heavily upon a number of gimmicks that quickly become hackneyed and overplayed after one or two episodes. The drunken, old codger, father Jack and the stupid and adolescent Fr. Dooley both come to mind here.

Monty Python's characterizations are just as bizarre and even more outrageous, but they were not repeated in every episode. The ongoing reappearance of the characters in Father Ted requires, I think, a deepening and a broadening of the characterizations, and that doesn't seem to be happening here. The most effective situation comedies, I think, are those in which the comedy is a product of the character.

Suit yourself, but I would not invest in digital TV only to view Father Ted.

Slán,
P.

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Shay (159.134.137.72 - 159.134.137.72)
Posted on Monday, March 03, 2003 - 01:14 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

in order to enjoy Father Ted you would have to be a very laid back person with not a very serious attitude when it comes to comedy programmes. some people find it hilarious while others find it stupid...either ways you will either love it or hate it.

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Jen (63.100.108.19 - 63.100.108.19)
Posted on Monday, March 03, 2003 - 02:57 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Chairde,

Go raibh maith agat Pádraig agus Shay!

Slán go fóill,
Jen

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.170 - 193.122.47.170)
Posted on Monday, March 03, 2003 - 07:47 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

While Father Ted is a Channel 4 production, the writers Graham Linehan and Arthur Matthews are from Dublin.
I think you're right Pádrag that the characters are a bit shallow and one-dimensional; the style seem to be like a cartoon rather than dialogue driven. I think it's done brilliantly though. The test really is, does it make you laugh out loud? Makes me laugh quietly.

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ursula (209.170.162.243 - 209.170.162.243)
Posted on Thursday, March 13, 2003 - 02:57 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Sheámuis, A Chara,

I think U.C. Berkeley in the San Francisco Bay Area also has an Irish studies program (it may be called "Celtic Studies"). A google search will sort it for you. Plus, there's lots of people who want either individual or small group instruction. You might want to check with the Irish Heritage Foundation in Chicago: they do regular Irish classes.

Le meas,
Ursula

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