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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (January-June) » More about learning the language... « Previous Next »

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Jen (63.100.108.20 - 63.100.108.20)
Posted on Friday, February 21, 2003 - 04:16 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

James, a chara,

(and anyone else who would to comment)

In another post, you suggested to J that he pick up some self-study books and cassettes to get started (and you recommended a few to start with). I've been regularly browsing the posts here for close to a year, but I'm ashamed to say, I haven't taken any steps to begin learning the language. My excuse is that I haven't been able to find a class in my area that meets on a day that I'm free. Honestly, I've never been a "language" person, and I've been scared into believing that my terrible aptitude for languages will prevent me from ever making any progress with this oh so difficult language.

Aside from the obvious: buy the books/cassettes and use them, do you have any thoughts on the best way for a newcomer to dig in?

Le meas,
Jen

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Pádraig Mac G. (205.244.12.178 - 205.244.12.178)
Posted on Friday, February 21, 2003 - 05:28 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Jen, A Chara,

Here's just the thing for a procrastinator who may have been saying things like "as soon as I find a class in my area," or "as soon as I get some books."

Follow this link:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/northernireland/blas/learners/index.shtml

to a program called "Giota Beag" which was created for BBC Northern Ireland. This will get you started immediately. With just a few mouse clicks you'll be listening to the instruction of Fearghal Mag Iguinn who in addition to being the instructor is just plain fun to listen to.

Within ten minutes you'll have your cupla focal.

Then let us all know your reaction. If, as you say, you've been following the exchanges on this forum, you know that there are a considerable number of "lads" that just can't wait to help you.

Árd mór ort,
Pádraig

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James (209.48.182.219 - 209.48.182.219)
Posted on Friday, February 21, 2003 - 07:46 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Jen, A Chara:

My personal suggestion is to put ego in check, put brain in gear and jump in with both feet! Don't worry about mistakes--you can't learn to swim without swallowing a few mouthfuls of water.

You will never ever see the majority of the people on this site so there's no need to be embarassed. Get your cupla focal and start using them as soon as you possibly can. Things just naturally start to fall into place from there--OK maybe not "naturally" but things do start to gel with some regular usage combined with regular study.

I look forward to seeing your next few posts. I bet you'll be posting as gaeilge within 30 days. You can't help it---you just get sucked into "this thing of ours."

Le meas,

James

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Jen (192.190.237.219 - 192.190.237.219)
Posted on Sunday, February 23, 2003 - 10:16 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thanks Pádraig and James, for your encouragement!

Fearghal Mag Uiginn on the Giota Beag program is quite a character! After going through lession one, I can see that his "enthusiasm" will help to keep things fun!

Yesterday I purchased the Teach Yourself Irish book and cassettes (it was the only choice in stock at the bookstore). I must say, its very intimidating! As was mentioned before, this language is very different than anything you've ever been exposed to before!

Can someone give me the pronunication of "Gaeilge Agus Failte," so that I don't completely butcher it when I call Ireland to order a copy? Go raibh maith agat! (See, I'm learning already!)

Slán,
Jen

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Pádraig Mac G. (205.244.12.98 - 205.244.12.98)
Posted on Sunday, February 23, 2003 - 10:35 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

gayl eg geh agus fawl cheh (main accent on fawl)

Keep in mind, Jen that the pronunciation of Irish is highly diverse. I've heard recordings of three or more persons, each one pronouncing the same words differently. I'm not familiar with Teach Yourself Irish, but if it emphasizes a dialect other than Ulster, you could become confused by trying to work with it AND Giota Beag.

I have found that it helps, whenever possible to have whatever I'm listening to in print in front of me so that I can follow along. By now you're aware that unlike Spanish, Irish doesn't sound like it looks to an English speaker.

Keep in touch and let us know how you're progressing. And by the way, just as we said, you already have your cúpla focal.

Tóg go bog é agus beannacht Dé ort.
Pádraig

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