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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (January-June) » Translation needed asap « Previous Next »

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susan scott (66.82.44.181 - 66.82.44.181)
Posted on Tuesday, February 18, 2003 - 10:16 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Hello:
I have an urgent request. I need an Irish translation for 'Beautiful Peacemaker'. I lost a niece in a car accident on Dec 11, 2002. Her birthday is March 14 and as a family (10 siblings) we are naming a star after her memory. She was called the peacemaker by friends and family. She was also a National Champion Irish dancer, and loved the dance and music. I need this asap. I appreciate your help.
Thank you
Susan
sue@webstewards.com

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James (158.253.120.10 - 158.253.120.10)
Posted on Tuesday, February 18, 2003 - 11:18 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Susan, A Chara:

Please accept my sincere condolences on the loss of your niece. I know that your family is experiencing the pain and sadness that comes with an unexpected loss. My prayers are with you and your family.

I am not a native speaker and am still striving to get a firm grasp on this wonderful language of our ancestors. So, having said that, I will offer this as a start point with the full expectation that others will respond with confirmations or corrections. Do not have anything permanently inscribed until that has happened.

First, I don't think the term "Beautiful Peacemaker" will translate well into Irish. Beautiful is not much of a problem but Peacemaker is a contraction of two english words and I'm just not sure there is an Irish equivalent. But, this is what I've concoted thusfar:

Beautiful = álainn

Peace = síocháin

Make or Do = déan

Therefore, without explaining the grammar that goes behind some subtle changes I would think the following is pretty close:

Déanoir go-hálainn den síocháin

Literally: Beautiful Maker of the Peace

At least, I think that's the literal translation.

Give this post a few days and I'm sure this will get modified or amended to fit your request perfectly.

Again, please convey to your family my sincere condolences. I will light a candle for your cousin.

Le meas,

James

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rachel (65.29.85.245 - 65.29.85.245)
Posted on Tuesday, February 18, 2003 - 03:36 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I need the translation for sisters

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Pádraig Mac Gafraidh (63.161.61.92 - 63.161.61.92)
Posted on Tuesday, February 18, 2003 - 04:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

sisters = deirfiúracha

I'm assuming your request for the plural is intentional.

One sister would be = deirfiúr

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 09:32 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Beautiful is álainn as James said.
There is no terse transaltion for peacemaker

Maker would be déantóir, but this would be unusual applied to a person.

I'd go for "beautiful source of peace":

Foinse álainn síochána

But I'd like to check my copy of the bible for
"Blessed are the peacemakers" that will likely give a better translation.

Back tomorrow

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Pádraig Mac G. (63.161.61.105 - 63.161.61.105)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 01:27 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hello, Aonghus, a chara,

Here's the verse from Matthew 5:

Is méanar do lucht síochána a dhéanamh óir glaofar clann Dé orthu.

While I have your attention, can you help identify where the expression in question begins and ends? I'm unfamiliar with "do lucht" in this context.

Buíochas, a chara.
Pádraig

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Aonghus (159.134.58.105 - 159.134.58.105)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 03:17 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Is méanar do - It is well for
lucht síochána a dheanamh - those who make peace

"Lucht" is a group of people.

This would bring us back to James'
"déantóir aláinn síochana"

But I have found a translation of the peace prayer of Saint Francis:
...déan díom cuisle do shíochana... make me the fount of your peace

So I would modify my post above to
"Cuisle aláinn na síochana"
If you are addressing the person in a message it would become

"A Chuisle alainn na síochana"

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Aonghus (159.134.58.105 - 159.134.58.105)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 03:19 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Apart of course from my typo on álainn
I'm afraid I have a tendency to wantonly missplace fadas

"Cuisle álainn na síochana"

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Pádraig Mac G. (205.244.12.56 - 205.244.12.56)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 03:35 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Chara, Aonghus

Typo, Schmypo! That's one beautiful phrase. Maith thú (with an assist from Assisi.)

P.

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Al Evans (208.188.101.145 - 208.188.101.145)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 03:36 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Phádraig,

Is méanar do lucht síochána a dhéanamh óir glaofar clann Dé orthu.

"Happy are the people who make peace for they are called the family of God."

That's how I'd translate it, without remembering the Bible verse particularly.

The part that means "blessed are the peacemakers" is "Is méanar do lucht síochána a dhéanamh".

So it's like

"lucht oibre" = people who work, considered as a group = workers.

"lucht síochana a dhéanamh" = people who are "ag déanamh síochana", as a group = peacemakers.

That doesn't help much with the original question, though. It seems to lead to conclusions similar to James's -- déantóir síochana -- which really sounds like some kind of manufacturing is going on.

--Al Evans

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Pádraig Mac Gafraidh (205.244.12.56 - 205.244.12.56)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 03:53 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Aonghus, A Chara,

I just remembered that some time back I raised the question about the use of the word "cuisle," asking whether it should be used metaphorically as it is here. My question got lost in the melee.

Not wishing to conflict with St Francis, nevertheless, I thought of cuisle as a more clinical term like the pulse in a man's veins.

I think I might have chosen "fuarán" instead.

All that notwithstanding, that's a wonderful expression especially given the circumstances of Susan's request.

Thoughts?

P.

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Paul (66.152.218.225 - 66.152.218.225)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 04:08 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Phadraig, a chara,
I'm a learner, not a native speaker, but I've often heard and seen "a chuisle" used as a term of endearment. Yes, it's literally a pulse, but I think it's a beautifully poetic usage.
My mother, with grandparents from Kerry, had a
"cupla focal," 'a chuisle' among them.
Slan tamall, Paul

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Pádraig Mac G (205.244.12.134 - 205.244.12.134)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 04:38 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Phól, A Chara,

Maith go leor agus go raibh maith agat.

Slán,
Pádraig

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Fintan (203.221.123.223 - 203.221.123.223)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 08:07 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Chairde,

Would it be possible to use 'duine síochána' (person of peace) as a singular of 'lucht síochána'(peacemakers [plural])?

Le meas,
Fintan

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Pádraig Mac G. (63.161.61.78 - 63.161.61.78)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 09:42 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Fhintan, a chara,

That's one for the guys in the trenches who know what sounds right.

In Synge's "The Aran Islands," a native islander who is just learning English writes a letter in which the salutation is "Noble Person." (A dhaoine uaisle)

Sure it's correct English, but what Brit, Yank, Canuck, or Aussie talks that way?

It's like the the rejected lover with the miocardial infarction. (Broken heart.) Unless I've heard a native say it or seen it in print, I wait, cringing, for the laughter in the background each time I venture to jump in.

Fáilte,
Pádraig

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Pádraig Mac Gafraidh (63.161.61.78 - 63.161.61.78)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 11:21 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Chairde,

Many years ago (let's gently round it off to 60) my father used to half sing and half hum what I thought was a song about somebody named Macushlah. His voice would always trail off into pensive reverie, and I never got to hear the end of the song. As he grew older he sang less, and when Alzheimer's came to steal his mind before the Lord called him, the song passed from both our memories. And so I thought I'd never hear the song again.

But then this question about the Irish word for fount or flow, or pulse began to niggle at my brain. And more than once I found myself returning to ask questions about it's appropriate usage. I was especially struck by Aonghus' translation of "peacemaker" for Susan in which he used the term, and I wrote a post to say so. Then Fintan's post recalled my attention to the question, and I just couldn't let go of it.

I believe that not everything we remember (or forget) is merely a function of our conscious intellects. I believe that sometimes God instructs the angels to secure certain tidbits of experience in our unconscious that later on will act as connectors to something important -- no --something iontach.

To shorten my story, it wasn't a song about someone named Macushlah after all. It was, across the barrier of years, only "mo chuisle," and after all those years I got to hear him sing the song again.


MACUSHLA (Josephine Rowe/Dermot MacMurrough)

Macushla! Macushla! Your sweet voice is calling
Calling me softly again and again
Macushla! Macushla! I hear its dear pleading
My blue eyed Macushla, I hear it in vain
Macushla! Macushla! Your white arms are reaching
I feel their enfolding caressing me still
Fling them out from the darkness, my lost love
Macushla, let them find me and bind me again if they will
Macushla! Macushla! Your red lips are saying
That death is a dream and love is for aye
Then awaken Macushla, awake from your dreaming
My blue eyed Macushla, awaken to stay

Oiche mhaith, mo chuisle.
Pádraig

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Thursday, February 20, 2003 - 04:02 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Ó Donaill gives "Cuisle na hÉigse" for the fount of poetry.

Cuisle means vein.

It is nothing new that terms from the medical world are used figuratively (or vice versa!)

Fintan:
The singular of lucht síochána would be duine.
What I was trying to avoid was "déantóir" because a peace maker doesn't make peace, they bring it.

De Bhaldraithe gives Ceann reitigh as a translation of peace maker, but it didn't sound appropriate

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Susan Scott (209.244.211.6 - 209.244.211.6)
Posted on Friday, February 21, 2003 - 10:11 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Could someone provide a phonetic version of the phrase for me, as I am totally unfamiliar with the language. "Cuisle álainn na síochana"
Thank you all for your help. Here is a link to the Buffalo NY University newsletter. Chrisy was a member of the crew team there, and they christened a boat after her memory on Wed, Feb 19th. Thanks again
Susan
http://spectrum.buffalo.edu/article.php?id=8673

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Friday, February 21, 2003 - 10:35 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi Susan,

Here's how I pronounce it, place most of the stress on the parts of the word in capitals.


Cuisle: CUSH-la
Álainn: AW-lin
Na: Na
Síochána: SHEE-ahawna

Don't forget the accent on the second "a" in Síochána.

Slán agus beannacht,

Oliver.

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Pádraig Mac Gafraidh (205.244.12.190 - 205.244.12.190)
Posted on Friday, February 21, 2003 - 11:21 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Shúsanna, A Chara

Thre's no substitute for hearing the Irish spoken, and since the meaning of Cuisle álainn na síochána will surely be with you forever, I urge you to keep looking and listening for that person who can secure the sound of it for you forever as well.

I was saddened by the story of your niece and I am touched by the beautiful thing you are doing in her memory. I was moved by the exquisite image Aonghus found to capture what must be in your heart.

Nothing ever happens in a vaccuum, although a medium like this gives us the feeling of isolation. Not all the words that are written here get a direct response, but I'm convinced now and then one person on this forum gets to another. For myself, I want to say thank you, Susan because your message struck a spark for me that recalled a memory of my Dad that I will hold onto for however many short years are left to me. And I'll never hum the tune to "Mo Cuisle" but that I remember your message, and looking at a quiet night sky full of stars, all of us may wonder, which one is "Cuisle Álainn na Síochána?"

Kushla Awlan nuh shee kawnuh

Beannacht Dé ort, a chara,
Pádraig

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Brian Wolcott (138.78.17.172 - 138.78.17.172)
Posted on Friday, February 28, 2003 - 03:28 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I am looking for the Gaeilge translation for the last name Wolcott, if anyone knows I would really appreciate it.

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collin wilson (24.161.75.99 - 24.161.75.99)
Posted on Friday, February 28, 2003 - 09:54 am:   Edit Post Print Post

i need a translation for "the red dragon will rise again" i have a tatoo of one and i want to know how its written originally.
thanks

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Friday, February 28, 2003 - 08:08 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Collin,

Are you sure it's Irish you want? Isn't the Red Dragon a Welsh symbol?

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Maidhc Ó G (63.188.128.41 - 63.188.128.41)
Posted on Saturday, March 01, 2003 - 12:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

And speaking of rising again, I recall the red phoenix being a Polish symbol.
Slán,
Maidhc.

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collin wilson (24.161.75.99 - 24.161.75.99)
Posted on Sunday, March 02, 2003 - 02:42 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I was under the impression the red dragon meant "the spirit of the celts is eternal" is there a translation for that?

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Pádraig Mac G. (205.244.12.56 - 205.244.12.56)
Posted on Sunday, March 02, 2003 - 04:17 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Mhaidhc, A Chara,

And I left the fada off the tábla. Nó: Tá fada ar an tábla. I checked the Foclóir Póca and mord, tábla, and clar are all listed. I think the first two are synonymous, but clar is used to indicate the contents of a book.

Meanwhile, Oliver, I'm still waiting for cupán cáife and acknowledgement that you've been watching that dreadful Father Ted. I also wonder whether that show might be taken by 'friends in distant places' as an accurate portrayal of Irish island life.

Slán,
P.

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Sunday, March 02, 2003 - 09:21 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi Collin,
That phrase you gave could be translated into Irish (bíonn spiorad na gCeilteach síoraí) but it really wouldn't be very authentic. The Celts never thought of themselves as such, this was a name given them by the ancient Greeks (keltoi). They were a tribal society and didn't think of themselves in any other terms.
Although in Ireland a national culture did develop the various kings were often at war with each other. Indeed, when the Romans left Britain the Irish of Leinster invaded Wales forcing the Celts there to flee to Brittany in Northern France.

The society these people lived in, which we call Celtic, is entirely alien to us and we'll never really understand their way of thinking.


Hi Pádraig,
Bord is the common usage for the dinner table.
Tábla is not a word I don't see used and a good thing too beacause it's just Géarla.
Clár is: any flat surface, a plain, a plane (geometry), a programme of events, timetable, contents of a book.

Yes, I was watching Father Ted. It's been very popular with young people both in Ireland and in England, the new Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams says it's his favourite TV show.
If you try and forget that they're priests the surreal comedy is quite superb, up there with Monty Python.

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Monday, March 03, 2003 - 06:09 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Oliver
Tábla is not Géarla

The word came into both English and Irish from Latin, and is in common usage in Ulster!

See An Foclóir Beag
tábla [ainmfhocal firinscneach den cheathrú díochlaonadh]
bord; bailiúchán figiúirí nó fíricí leagtha amach ina gcolúin (tábla méadaithe); liosta fíricí

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Marcia (208.61.29.122 - 208.61.29.122)
Posted on Monday, March 03, 2003 - 11:00 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Some interesting basic reading on the Irish Celts:

Before the Galician Celts(Gauls/Milesians) arrived in Ireland: The Firbolgs and Tuatha De Danann(people of the Goddess Dana) inhabited the island:

http://www.ireland.org/irl_hist/hist1.htm

---

King Milesius of Spain, Scota and the (now ancient)Egyptian connection:

http://fp.dowling.f9.co.uk/a3_1700.htm

---

The Irish Celts (in brief):

http://www.irelandseye.com/irish/people/settlers/celts1.shtm

---

The Irish are a race apart:

http://www.insideireland.com/sample19.htm

---

My Irish surnames go back to, "bran", meaning 'raven' and "Dal" meaning, 'he who is present at assemblies' or 'assemblyman'. lol

Slaínte, a chairde!

Marcia

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.170 - 193.122.47.170)
Posted on Monday, March 03, 2003 - 08:04 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi Aonghus,

I'm ignorant of the common usage of Irish, unfortunately.
Does "tábla" came from the Latin tabula (a board or a plank)? If it does then it ought only be used as a word for a list (a table of laws, for example) or a wax writing tablet (tabula rasa) or a painted panel.

The latin word for table as a piece of furniture is "mensa".
So, I always thought that "tábla" came into Irish through English. Still, it's usage that counts in languages, if it's used in Irish then it's an Irish word.

Marcia,

Thanks for the links, sone good ones there.

Slán,

Oliver.

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Tuesday, March 04, 2003 - 04:13 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Oliver

It is important to remember that Ireland was exposed, through the Church and monasteries, to Latin and Greek for several centuries before English even existed. (slight exaggeration there).

So there are many words which appear to be similar to English words, but were absorbed into Irish from Latin or Greek centuries before.

And I would be very careful about saying a word should be only used in a set meaning. The fact is that there are dialects in Ireland, and people in Ulster use "tábla" where I would use "bord". Neither can be said to be more "correct".

And it is at least possible that Bord came from english board and is more recent!

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Bradford (216.16.15.66 - 216.16.15.66)
Posted on Tuesday, March 04, 2003 - 08:46 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A Aonghus,

As I understand it, "bord" actually was devired from the Norse word for table, picked up during the Viking occupation.

Slán,

Bradford

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Tuesday, March 04, 2003 - 10:48 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Whatever..
I was trying to make the point that trying to select/reject words as being Irish due to their apparent origin is not safe.

By all means be concerned about what we call Béarlachas.. but I think this should be at the level of syntax/turns of phrase rather than individual words.

beirigí bua

Aonghus

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Bradford (216.16.15.66 - 216.16.15.66)
Posted on Tuesday, March 04, 2003 - 10:58 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Aonghus,

I apologise as I didn't mean to undermine the point you were trying to make. I agree with what you're saying.

I simply wanted to make sure the facts were straight on where the word "bord" originated. And now we know that neither "bord" nor "tábla" originated with Béarla, and we can use whichever one is appropriate for the dialect that we speak.

Bradford

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Tuesday, March 04, 2003 - 11:17 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Apology gratefully accepted!
Etymology is not an exact science, and I'm damned if I will let it govern how I speak!

see http://homepage.eircom.net/~aonghus/forogra.htm

for a quote I lifted from Bréandán Ó hEithir...

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Jim Dickerson (24.54.89.95 - 24.54.89.95)
Posted on Saturday, March 15, 2003 - 03:54 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I would like to thank everyone that contributed to the Irish Translation of 'Beautiful Peacemaker'. We celebrated Chrisys 19th birthday last night (March 14) with family and friends. We were presented with the offical naming of the star 'Cush-la AW-lin Na SHEE-ahawna'. It is located at 'Draco RA 19H14m37s D 57 degree 48 minute'. Allthough our chrisy is not with us physically, she continues to shine her love and happiness among all of us with her spiritutal soul, which we all know consists of 'pure love'.

Peace to all,

Chrisys Father (Jim Dickerson)

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Phil (159.134.209.55 - 159.134.209.55)
Posted on Sunday, March 16, 2003 - 08:13 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Beautiful Peacemaker
--------------------

Peacemaker = maker of peace

In the English language, we take out the "of" and stick the "OF word" at the beginning.

School bag = bag of school
Tomb Raider = Raider of Tomb/Tombs/The tomb/The tombs

Beautiful Peacemaker -> Beautiful maker of peace -> Déantóir álainn síochána

I think that's perfect. The spelling of each word is correct.

-Phil

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liz (24.218.212.128 - 24.218.212.128)
Posted on Tuesday, March 18, 2003 - 05:03 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I was hoping that someone could help me translate "sea home" or "sea house"?
Thanks!
Liz
liz@ashtonservices.com

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Aonghus (159.134.58.98 - 159.134.58.98)
Posted on Tuesday, March 18, 2003 - 05:17 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Sea house
Teach mara

Home is baile, the same word as a village, so I suggest you stick with Teach mara

For completeness, sea home would be Baile mara

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James (209.48.182.219 - 209.48.182.219)
Posted on Tuesday, March 18, 2003 - 05:21 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Teach Fharraige is what I would put on it off the top of my head.

There is probably a better, shorter, option. Wait for some others to chime in. Preferably some native speakers or those with formal Irish education.

(Phil, here's your chance--what are you going to do with it??)

Le meas,

James

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liz (24.218.212.128 - 24.218.212.128)
Posted on Tuesday, March 18, 2003 - 06:28 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you.
Liz

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Liz (24.218.212.128 - 24.218.212.128)
Posted on Tuesday, March 18, 2003 - 06:33 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Susan's lovely tribute to her niece inspired me to honor my mother. Thanks for helping me to do that with your translations.
Liz

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James (209.48.182.219 - 209.48.182.219)
Posted on Tuesday, March 18, 2003 - 07:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Aonghuis, A Chara:

What's wrong with my suggestion? Not meant as a confrontational question, just curious. How does mara differ from fhairrage? Is is dialectal, or grammatical?

Go raibh maith agat,

James

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 04:24 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Nothing wrong, as far as I know.

Both muir and farraige are words for the sea.
I'm not sure whether they belong more to one or other of the dialects; My gut feeling is that muir is used more often than farraige for things of the sea -

Maighdéan mhara - mermaid
Capall mara - seahorse
Crosóg mara - starfish etc.

Teach mara just felt right.

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Phil (159.134.209.136 - 159.134.209.136)
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 04:44 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

James, you might wanna learn the art of assumption, ie. how to assume properly without making a penis out of yourself.

Formal education of a language is bullshit.
Reading a book to learn a language is bullshit.
Listening to the radio to learn a language is bullshit.

The one true way to learn a language is to speak it.

-Phil

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Ó (66.152.218.225 - 66.152.218.225)
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 04:53 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

How about
Radharc na Mara?
Not an exact translation of 'sea house,'
but I like it nonethless.


Regards, Ó

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Aonghus (159.134.59.219 - 159.134.59.219)
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 05:00 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Is beag foighne is féidir bheith ag aoinne leatsa, a dhailtín gan mhaith.

Tuig seo anois. Tá Gaeilge agamsa ón gcliabhán, agus tá bheirt mhac dá thógail agam le Gaeilge.

Tá tusa ag spochadh as daoine atá ag deanamh iarracht ionraic Gaeilge a fhoghlaim i bhfad i gcéin ó Éirinn. Meas tú nach bhfuil fhios acu gurb í beatha teanga a labhairt? Agus tá roinnt acu ag déanamh an mhaith ar fad, agus iad níos liofa ná do léithéid de dhailtín a bhfuil cúpla bliain caite ar scoil aige le Gaeilge, agus atá ag teacht anseo mar an saoi mhór ag dul a múineadh dúinne conas an teanga a labhairt - ach nach néiríonn leat ach do chantal a roinnt ar dhaoine eile le do mhionnaí móra sa Sács Bhéarla. A abhacín nimhneach, éirigh as a bheith ag spaladh cacamas ar dhaoine fiúntacha, agus tosaigh ag smaoineamh le d'inchinn seachas le do bhundún. Nó b'fheidir go mbfhearr dhuit do leigheas fhéin a shlogadh agus dul suas ort fhéin.

Iarraim pardún ar an gcuid eile agaibh, ach ní mor dom mo racht feirge le Phil a scaoileadh.

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Al Evans (208.188.101.145 - 208.188.101.145)
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 05:53 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A hAonghuis...

Ná cothaigh an troll!

:-)

--Al Evans--

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James (209.48.182.219 - 209.48.182.219)
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 06:05 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

OH!!! Phil--you had such a chance and you blew it!!

I thought I set that up so sweetly that a blind man could have hit it out of the park!! Swing and a miss, buddy. Could have done something good and all you came back with was profanity.

We'll find you another chance later and see how you do with that one. Practice does make perfect, you know!

Le meas,

James

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.170 - 193.122.47.170)
Posted on Friday, March 21, 2003 - 03:57 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A hAonghuis,
Is deas an liofacht dearfach agat agus greannmhar a léamh! Maith thú.

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J.Conniff (152.163.188.1 - 152.163.188.1)
Posted on Friday, April 04, 2003 - 02:17 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

If someone would help, I need the translation for the phrase....riding, if only in my dreams. Thanks,Seamus

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Monday, April 07, 2003 - 04:15 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Ag marcaíocht, cé nach bhfuil ann ach i'm taibhrimh

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