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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (January-June) » Translation for the children book « Previous Next »

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lila prap (194.249.12.154 - 194.249.12.154)
Posted on Friday, February 14, 2003 - 03:21 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dear friends,
I'm preparing a picture book for children: ANIMALS' INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY. I'd like to ask you to help to translate 14 short sentences in gaeilge:

1. A HORSE NEIGHS: NEIGH – NEIGH
2. A DONKEY BRAYS: HEE-HAW
3. A SHEEP BLEATS: BAA- BAA
4. A DUCK QUACKS: QUACK-QUACK
5. A COW MOOS: MOO
6. A BEE BUZZES: BUZZ - BUZZ
7. A BIRD CHIRPS: CHIRP-CHIRP
8. A DOG BARKS: WOOF-WOOF
9. A COCK CROWS: COOK-A-DOODLE-DOO
10. A HEN CLUCKS: CLUCK-CLUCK
11. A CAT MIAOWS: MIAOW
12. A PIG GRUNTS: OINK-OINK
13. AN ELEPHANT TOOTS: TOO – TOO
14. A FROG CROAKS: REBBIT – REBBIT

I’d be very glad if you’ll help me in this project to make children interested for different languages and cultures.
I’d write your name into a book and send you one when it’s finished. Nice regards Lila
(lilijana.praprotnik@guest.arnes.si)

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James (209.48.182.219 - 209.48.182.219)
Posted on Friday, February 14, 2003 - 04:19 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Lila, A Chara:

What a wonderful idea! I'm not a native speaker by any stretch but this is what I've come up with. Some of the noise specific words are not in my dictionary but that doesn't mean they don't exist. It just means I need a better dictionary!

I've also changed what you've asked for just a bit because I believe it to be more idiomatically accurate. The Irish would say that someone, or something is "at the..." ie: "The dog is at the barking" rather than "The dog barks"--at least, that's what I think.

Wait for some of the native speakers to chime in. I'm very interested in how they would treat this.

Again--great idea. Getting the kids interested is the only hope for any language.

1. A HORSE NEIGHS: NEIGH – NEIGH
2. A DONKEY BRAYS: HEE-HAW
3. A SHEEP BLEATS: BAA- BAA Tá sé ag méileach an chaora

4. A DUCK QUACKS: QUACK-QUACK Tá sé ag potrálaí an lacha.

5. A COW MOOS: MOO

6. A BEE BUZZES: BUZZ - BUZZ Tá sé ag dordán an bheach

7. A BIRD CHIRPS: CHIRP-CHIRP Tá sé ag bíog an ean.

8. A DOG BARKS: WOOF-WOOF Tá sé ag sceamhaíl an mhadra.

9. A COCK CROWS: COOK-A-DOODLE-DOO
10. A HEN CLUCKS: CLUCK-CLUCK

11. A CAT MIAOWS: MIAOW

12. A PIG GRUNTS: OINK-OINK Tá sé ag uallffairt an mhuc.

13. AN ELEPHANT TOOTS: TOO – TOO

14. A FROG CROAKS: REBBIT – REBBIT Tá sé ag grág an loscann.

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Lila (194.249.0.230 - 194.249.0.230)
Posted on Friday, February 14, 2003 - 09:57 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

James, A chara, Thank you very much for moral support. I'm very glad you helped me as much as you could. I hope I'll get help for all the sentences. Gaeilge is really some special language.
My best regards
Lila

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James (209.48.182.219 - 209.48.182.219)
Posted on Saturday, February 15, 2003 - 01:35 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá faílte romhat! Don't put my renderings in your book though--I'm probably off base. Wait to see how the native speakers respond. I find it interesting to see how something you think is so right turns out to be so wrong once the subject matter experts ring in!

Le meas,

James

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alec1 (62.254.104.88 - 62.254.104.88)
Posted on Sunday, February 16, 2003 - 04:29 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

James

I can make little or no connection between the original request-and the answer that you gave

But maybe I'm a bit confused

Which would not be unusual for me

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davidgannon (193.1.100.103 - 193.1.100.103)
Posted on Monday, February 17, 2003 - 07:45 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I am studying Irish in Ireland and I don't believe that it would be possible to translate these sentences into Irish because the won't have a rythm to them that would be required in order to make the book interesting to. The book would have to be written in Irish with no requard to what the English is. I hope you will be able to get the book published because it is a novel idea.
Go raibh maith agat.
Daithi O Gionnain

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Lila (194.249.0.196 - 194.249.0.196)
Posted on Monday, February 17, 2003 - 10:42 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Additional explanation: The book won't be only in english and irish. I collected 40 languages from all around the world. I'd need gaeilge translation as one of the "clue" languages in europe. Nice regards Lila

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James (209.48.182.219 - 209.48.182.219)
Posted on Monday, February 17, 2003 - 11:36 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Alec,

You may not be confused at all. It may be my limited understanding of Irish that is the confusing factor.

What Lila asked was for someone to help her translate 14 sentences into Irish. I took a few of those sentences and gave them my best shot. It may be that my "best shot" is off by a mile, not even on the paper, nowhere near the broadside of a barn--pick your favorite idiomatic expression for just plain wrong.

My approach was that it seems common in Irish to explain the act of doing something as "one is at the doing" ie; Tá me ag foghlaim = I am at the learning = I am learning; Tá sí ag ithe = She is at the eating = She is eating; Tá sé ag scríobh = he is at the writing.....I hope this illustrates the basis of my approach.

The second portion of my approach was that there is no indefinite article in Irish, as I am sure you are well aware. Therefore, I chose to modify her sentences utilizing the definite article. In retrospect my use of lenition as it applies to the definite article may have been a bit over zealous.

I also put this post up in the middle of a 12 hour shift at work and only had a small, somewhat incomplete dictionary from which to work. Now, with a better dictionary and with a more focused mind, I would make a few adjustments. For example, "Tá sé ag grág an loscann" might better be "Tá sé ag grágach an loscann". Would you suggest Grágach loscann (Croaking a frog??).

I readily admit my limitations in this language and would humbly request that you offer something that you feel to be more accurate. Lila has a book to get published and she has requested the help of the people on this site. I tried--If I fell short, it wasn't without fair warning. I stated, plainly, as I do in virtually every post I offer on this site, that I am by no stretch a native speaker and nothing that I offer should go to print, go on skin, or be engraved in a ring or headstone without the input of someone more academically gifted than I or someone who can lend the unmatched accuracy of the native ear.

I offer my posts on this site as much for my own education as for that of others. Please, if I am off base in any way, feel free to make corrections. As I have stated on a number of occassions--one of the prerequisites to learning any language is the willingness to put the ego on hold and lay your best effort out there for all to see and to correct---you can't learn to ride a bike without falling down, you can't learn to swim without swallowing a little bit of water---it's the same with a language, any language,--you can't learn to speak it without allowing your tongue to stumble over it.

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Aonghus (159.134.58.109 - 159.134.58.109)
Posted on Monday, February 17, 2003 - 03:53 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A HORSE NEIGHS: NEIGH ? NEIGH
Déanann capall seitreach:
2. A DONKEY BRAYS: HEE-HAW
Déanann asal grágaíl: íá-íá
3. A SHEEP BLEATS: BAA- BAA
Déanann caora méileach: baa-baa
4. A DUCK QUACKS: QUACK-QUACK
Déanann lacha grágarsach: bhac bhac
5. A COW MOOS: MOO
Déanann bó géimneach: mú
6. A BEE BUZZES: BUZZ ? BUZZ
Déanann beach crónán: biss - biss
7. A BIRD CHIRPS: CHIRP-CHIRP
Déanann éan bícearnach: tsíp tsíp
8. A DOG BARKS: WOOF-WOOF
Déanann madra tafann: bhuf bhuf
9. A COCK CROWS: COOK-A-DOODLE-DOO
Déanann coileach glaoch:
10. A HEN CLUCKS: CLUCK-CLUCK
Déanann cearc glógarsach: glug-glug
11. A CAT MIAOWS: MIAOW
Déanann cat meamhlach: miao - miao
12. A PIG GRUNTS: OINK-OINK
Déanann muc gnúsacht: oinc-oinc
13. AN ELEPHANT TOOTS: TOO ? TOO
Déanann eilifint búireach: too-too
14. A FROG CROAKS: REBBIT ? REBBIT
Déanann frog grágaíl:

Onomatopoeia is not my strength, and being a city slicker I had to check De Bhaldraithe for these. Hopefully somebody else will be able to render the sounds in irish letters...

James, one of the grammar gurus will no doubt be better able to explain why ?Tá sé ag , an ? is wrong.

Tá ag would be ok.

To get the sense of an indefinite article, you can just leave the article out as I have done above.

Tá ag conveys the sense of something happening at this point in time.
Bíonn ag would give the sense of always.

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Lila (194.249.12.190 - 194.249.12.190)
Posted on Monday, February 17, 2003 - 05:51 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

It's very interesting to read your discussions.
It's very interessting for me to see these gaelic sentences, too, because I live in town in Slovenia that was named Celeia (the city of Celts) by Romans.
Aonghus, big thanks for your help. I hope that some onomatopoetic expert will add missing voices. My best regards

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Pádraig Mac Gafraidh (63.175.172.92 - 63.175.172.92)
Posted on Monday, February 17, 2003 - 06:37 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Chairde,

Onomatopoeia tends to be culture specific which is why bells that go "ding dong" in New York go "din din" in Paris and barking dogs in Boston go "bow wow" while Tokyo cannines say "pan pan."
Moreover, the foremost authorities on these sounds are the preschool children of the given milieu.

With this in mind, some of the 'natives' might check with the local páistí as to what barnyard sounds are popular these days. My experience in America is that little boys between the ages of 6 and 9 are especially skilled at reproducing animal sounds to the never ending distress of their teachers.

Recording the sounds via the Gaeilge phonics system should present little difficulty.

Now, my question for the grammar gurus, an gardai ghramadaí is, "what's wrong with the simple, defective verb 'arsa?'"

Let us say that Irish horses are saying "neigh neigh" throughout most of the Northwest these days. What's wrong with just recording:

"Né né arsa an capall."

If the construct employing 'arsa' is correct, the simplicity and the repetition would be ideally suited to young children.

"Maith thú, a Phádraig," arsa an guru.

Slán.
P.

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James (209.48.182.219 - 209.48.182.219)
Posted on Monday, February 17, 2003 - 06:57 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Phádraig,

Go han maith!! Maith thú agus sin é and any other accolade you can conjur. What brilliant simplicity!

That makes perfect sense. I just didn't know such a construction existed. Pedantic versus practical---Thanks for putting things right.

A Aonghuis (I keep forgetting the vocative of Aonghus):

Thanks for the feedback. I see your approach and must admit it "feels" right plus it is far more user friendly to the little ears. (Hey, it's more user friendly to my ears!!)

Lila, forget everything I offered and go with these two--they are far more accomplished than I.


Le meas,

James

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Lila (194.249.12.207 - 194.249.12.207)
Posted on Monday, February 17, 2003 - 07:05 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I'm adding just a few horses languages. Only the english horses say NEIGH NEIGH :)

1. A horse neighs: NEIGH – NEIGH (english)
gaeilge - ?
2. Il cavallo nitrisce: HIII HIII (italiano - italian)
3. In chaval sgrigna: SGRIGN - SGRIGN (rumantsch grischun - retoromanian)
4. Le cheval hennit: HIIII (francais - french)
5. El caballo relincha: III (español - spanish)
6. El cavall renilla: III (català - catalan)
7. Um cavalo relincha: YAHOU (português - portuguese)
8. Calul necheazã: II-HAHA (romanian)
9. Hesturinn hneggjar: HO-HO–HO (Íslenzk - island)
10. En hest vrinsker: VRINSK-VRINSK (norsk – norwegian)
11. En hest vrinsker: VRINSK VRINSK (dansk - danish)
12. En häst gnäggar: GNÄGG - GNÄGG (svenska - swedish)
13. Een paard hinnikt: HIHIHIHI (nederland - dutch)
14. Ein Pferd wiehert: IHAHAHAAA (deutsch - german)
15. E Ross wyheret: WYH – WYH (baseldytsch - swissgerman from Basel)
16. Koñ r¿y: IHA-HA (polski - polish)
17. Kùò øehtá: HI - HI (èesky - czech)
18. Konj rezgeta: IHAHA (slovensko - slovene)
19. Konj hrže: IHAHA (bosanski - bosnian)

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Pádraig Mac Gadfraidh (63.175.172.188 - 63.175.172.188)
Posted on Monday, February 17, 2003 - 07:21 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I readily admit my limitations in this language and would humbly request that you offer something that you feel to be more accurate. Lila has a book to get published and she has requested the help of the people on this site. I offer my posts on this site as much for my own education as for that of others.

DREASAIGH NA GADHAIR AIR, A SHÉAMAIS!

Slán,
P.

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Pádraig Mac Gafraidh (205.244.12.234 - 205.244.12.234)
Posted on Monday, February 17, 2003 - 11:35 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Shéamais, A Chara,

I'm not accepting the designation of Guru by writing this, and I'm not quite sure what Aonghus meant by "Tá sé ag, an is wrong." But I think I might have spotted what you were trying to do, and perhaps I can also spot the error.

It looks as though you were going for the Irish equivalent of "the frog is croaking" (the frog croaks) through the use of the verbal noun with the preposition 'ag.' You proffered:

"Tá sé ag grág an loscann."

For this to work at all, 'grág' would have to be a verbal noun. Actually it is a noun. Because of this, the first four letters of the expression -- Tá sé ag grág -- translate as "He is at a croak."

This is not unlike the sentence -- Tá Seán ag an doras -- John is at the door. I can't find a translation for the word croak used as a verb. But since I've brought John into the discussion, I'll replace croaking with talking.

"Tá Seán ag labhairt" translates to 'John is talking.' Therefore 'a frog is talking' (silly, I know) should read:

Tá loscann ag labhairt."

You appear to have written "He is at a croak the frog."

Just to drive ourselves a little deeper into pychosis, there's another use of ag.

"Tá loscann ag Seán." John has a frog.

If it were in his throat, perhaps we could get him to croak.

Oiche Mhaith, mo chara,
Pádraig

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James (209.48.182.219 - 209.48.182.219)
Posted on Monday, February 17, 2003 - 11:46 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Pádraig, Mo Chara:

You have nailed, precisely, what I was trying to do! Furthermore, you have illustrated how I should have been doing it even though that still would have been incorrect! Amazing talent, that.

I have attempted to construct a sentence, which in its construction was incorrect and in its application was likewise, incorrect. You have illustrated how, following my train of thought, I SHOULD have constructed it, yet, had I done so, I still would have been wrong!! Don't you just LOVE this forum!?!?!

I see my error on all counts. I swear, I learn more by making mistakes than I ever do by getting things right!

Go raibh maith agat, mo chara.

Oiche Mhaith.

James

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Tuesday, February 18, 2003 - 05:42 am:   Edit Post Print Post

My post was slightly garbled by my having used pointy brackets, which the website trys to turn into html tags.

I wrote Tá sé ag #something#, an #some beast#

Irish is a spoken language to me, and I rarely know the grammatical reason for things: I just -feel- some things are wrong.

Arsa would be fine.

I didn't use it, because I associate it with people and speech, and I'm not fond of anthromorphism.

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Pádraig Mac Gadfraidh (205.244.12.54 - 205.244.12.54)
Posted on Tuesday, February 18, 2003 - 07:37 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Hello, friend Aonghus,

Any report from the "trenches" confirming observations from the "ivory tower" is always welcome.

Go raibh maith 'gat, a chara.

I respect your preferences, and thank you for identifying the one concerning anthropomorphism. Sometimes we learners have difficulty distinguishing personal preferences from grammatical error.

Having reared (and being still in the process of rearing) eleven children, I can say that children love talking animals, and that probably accounts for a large part of their early interest in story telling and the written word.

Slán agat,
Pádraig

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Tuesday, February 18, 2003 - 09:57 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Having thought about it again, another reason I wouldn't use "arsa" is that it is past tense, whereas the english and the other languages suggest that this is something that always happens.

Déanann X Y is how you would say that in Irish.

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Pádraig Mac Gafraidh (205.244.12.147 - 205.244.12.147)
Posted on Tuesday, February 18, 2003 - 01:20 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

"Tá mo chathaoir-se briste," arsa Babaí Béar.

Just thought I'd throw that in as an example of a talking bear.

When I thought of arsa for Né né etc, thinking that it is past tense, and wondering how to use it in the present I found two sources indicating that 'arsa' may indicate past or present tense. The first source was An Foclóir Póca and the second was:

Christian Brothers, New Irish Grammar (Dublin: C.J. Fallon. 1994) p. 115.

"ar (arsa), says, said -- used only when the exact words of the speaker are given. ar is used only before seisean, sise, siadsan: --"

A Shéamais, while you're resting, check your McGonagle (did I spell that right?) and see what he says. It's probably indexed under "defective verbs."

Slán agus beannacht,
P.

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Maidhc Ó Gáibhtheacháin (68.168.83.24 - 68.168.83.24)
Posted on Tuesday, February 18, 2003 - 03:11 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A chairde,
I had some time on my hands, so I came up with these. Hhhmm, polymorphism, onomatopoeai, and a whole lot ó Blarney license. OH MY!
Déanann chapall seitreach é. NÉIGH NÉIGH
Déanann asal grágáil é. CHOÍ - CHEÁ
Déanann chaora méileach í. BAI - BAI
Déanann lacha vác í. CAEIC CAEIC
Táonn bhó ag géimneach í. MÚ
Táonn bheach dordán a dhéanamh í. BHF-BHF
Ligonn é gíog as. TAÍT-TAÍT or TEÍP-TEÍP
Ligonn mhadra tafann as. UABHF-UABHF
So, now you want some polymorphic onomatopoeia, eh? Try this one on for size.
Táonn choileach scairt a chur orainn é,"A CHÁICH, ÉIRIGH! ÉIRIGH!"
Táonn chearc ag glógarsach. CLAC-CLAC
Ligonn chat scairt as. MEÁÚ
Déanann mhuc gnúsacht é. (You decide.)ÁINC or OINC
Séidonn eilifint a stoc í. AIÚ
O.K. guys, remember that there's a lot of room for mistakes on my part. But, what do you think? C'mon, use your imaginations. Let loose your inner five year old!
Beannachtaí ar chách,
Maidhc.

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Lila (194.249.0.173 - 194.249.0.173)
Posted on Tuesday, February 18, 2003 - 05:00 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

:)
I didn't know that gaeilge is so complicated language.
Dear Maidhc, thank you for your help, I hope the others will agree with your solution.
I'm sending some Welsh for inspiration:

1. A HORSE NEIGHS: NEIGH - NEIGH
Mae ceffyl yn gweryru: Nei Nei!

2. A DONKEY BRAYS: HEE-HAW
Mae asyn yn brefu: Hi-haw!

3. A SHEEP BLEATS: BAA- BAA
Mae gafr brefu: Be be!

4. A DUCK QUACKS: QUACK-QUACK
Mae hwyaden yn : Cwac-cwac!

>>5. A COW MOOS: MOO
Mae buwch yn brefu: Mw!

Nice regards and big thanks to all, who help me with translation for my "animal farm"
Lila

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.170 - 193.122.47.170)
Posted on Tuesday, February 18, 2003 - 08:57 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi Lila,

There's been some heroic efforts here to fulfill your request, but you can see how strange Irish can be. I don't think any of us are 100% sure of how to do this - I haven't got a clue.

So, I've copied your post onto another forum (www.beo.ie/ple) where the native speakers and the people who speak Irish in the family congregate.

These guys will nail it down for you, I can guarantee it. Just bear with us another little while.

Slán,

Oliver.

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 04:17 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Maidhc
The "é" at the end of your sentences is wrong.

It reads as "The dog he is barking" which is as wrong in Irish as it would be in English.

What is "Táonn"? Possibly you mean Bíonn?

Ligonn should probably be Ligeann?

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Lila (194.249.12.226 - 194.249.12.226)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 08:47 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Dear Slán, it's very nice of you to help me this way. I tried on some other irish webs, but it seems that they all have some unexisting e-mails. You are all very nice guys, I love to read your comments - I have a great fun :)
My best regards to all
Lila

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 09:18 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Lila
Slán is the irish for Goodbye!

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Lila (194.249.0.144 - 194.249.0.144)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 09:32 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Oops, sorry! Oprostite! I tought it's a name. What is "A chara"?

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Pádraig Mac Gafraidh (63.175.172.193 - 63.175.172.193)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 10:44 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A Chara is the traditional greeting that is placed at the beginning of a personal letter. Usually it is accompanied by the first name of the person to whom the letter is written. It is in the vocative case, the form a noun takes when the person is being spoken to directly. That form includes the particle (A) and the person's name which is usually modified as to pronunciation.

For example, my name, Pádraig becomes A Phádraig when someone addresses me.

The word cara means friend. In the vocative it becomes A Chara.

The pronunciation of Lila does not change. A letter written to you would typically begin "A Lila, A Chara."

Slán agat,
Pádraig

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Lila (194.249.12.194 - 194.249.12.194)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 10:50 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A Phádraig, A Chara,
thank you for the explanation. Maybe I'll slowly learn some gaeilge :)
Slán,
Lila

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Maidhc Ó Gáibhtheacháin (68.168.82.218 - 68.168.82.218)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 01:04 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Aonghus, a chara,
You're quite correct on all three counts concerning my last installment. I did mean bíonn, not táonn and the pronouns "é" and "í" should only be used in the copula forms with adjectives. I thought they sounded funny,but left them on in hopes that someone would correct me, just so I could make certain. And I thank you for it,sir.
And indeed, it should also be ligeann. Arís, go raibh maith agat, a chara.
Slán,
Maidhc.

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Pádraig Mac G. (63.161.61.105 - 63.161.61.105)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 01:10 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Mhaidhc, A Chara,

I've been trying to decipher Ó Gáibhtheacháin, realizing that the boys at Ellis Island did a number on most Irish surnames during the famine.

What do you make of it?

P.

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Aonghus (159.134.58.105 - 159.134.58.105)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 03:21 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Maidhc
Fáilte is fiche romhat.

Aonghus

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Pádraig Mac G. (205.244.12.134 - 205.244.12.134)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 04:47 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Lila, A Chara,

There are several interesting responses to your original question over at Clar Beo Plé.

(www.beo.ie/ple)

Slán,
P.

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Lila (194.249.12.243 - 194.249.12.243)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 07:00 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Phádraig, A Chara,
I'm really glad that your plan worked. I'll look on this page to see, what came out of these sentences. A big thank for your help.
Slán,
Lila

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Thursday, February 20, 2003 - 01:01 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Right Lads!
This is the "word on the street" from the Gaeltacht of Cúil Aodh in West Cork, via www.beo.ie/ple.

First of all, there are no Irish words to imitate the sound of animals; according to Gearóid, they use the English sounds e.g. "baa baa".

We've been given quite a few alternative words for each animal so I thought just to pick the first in the list.

Also, I think we should match the sounds provided by Aonghus in a previous post.
------------------------------------------------
Scríobh Gearóid Ó Laoi:

Ní dóigh liom go raibh aithris ar fhuaimeanna na n-ainmhithe mórán sa Ghaolainn. Do chíoras an scéal seo le muintir Chúil Aodha cheana, agus don chuid is mó, is fuaimeanna an Bhéarla a d'úsáidisís


1. A HORSE NEIGHS: NEIGH – NEIGH
Déanann capall seithreach: Né Né

2. A DONKEY BRAYS: HEE-HAW
Déanann asal grágáil: íá íá


3. A SHEEP BLEATS: BAA- BAA
Déanann caora méileach: bea bea


4. A DUCK QUACKS: QUACK-QUACK
Bíonn lacha ag gogalaigh: bheac bheac

5. A COW MOOS: MOO
Bíonn bó ag géimnigh: Mú Mú

6. A BEE BUZZES: BUZZ - BUZZ
Bíonn na beacha ag crónán: bis bis

7. A BIRD CHIRPS: CHIRP-CHIRP
Déanann éan bíogarnach: tsíp tsíp

8. A DOG BARKS: WOOF-WOOF
Déanann madra tafann: bhuf bhuf

9. A COCK CROWS: COOK-A-DOODLE-DOO
Scairteann coileach: A CHÁICH, ÉIRIGÍ! ÉIRIGÍ!


10. A HEN CLUCKS: CLUCK-CLUCK
Déanann cearc glágarnach: poc poc

11. A CAT MIAOWS: MIAOW
Déanann cat miamhlach: miao - miao

12. A PIG GRUNTS: OINK-OINK
Bíonn an mhuc ag gnúsach: áinc áinc

13. AN ELEPHANT TOOTS: TOO – TOO
Trúmpann an Eilifint: Tú Tú


14. A FROG CROAKS: REBBIT – REBBIT
Bíonn frog ag crónán: Ribid ribid
---------------------------------------------

So, how's that? Can we agree on this so that Lila can get on with her book or does somebody absolutely disagree with something?

Slán go fóill,
Oliver.

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Pádraig, Mac G. (205.244.12.192 - 205.244.12.192)
Posted on Thursday, February 20, 2003 - 01:39 am:   Edit Post Print Post

CEART GO LEOR!

By the way, 36 posts to a single thread, That must be some sort of record.

Slán abhaile, a Lila.

Pádraig

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Maidhc Ó Gáibhtheacháin (68.168.82.218 - 68.168.82.218)
Posted on Thursday, February 20, 2003 - 10:21 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Dia duit, a Phádraig, a chara,
That name would be Gaughan. However, I understand that it has also been turned into Gavighan. I found it in "Irish Surnames"(sixth edition) by Edward MacLysacht.
Dr. Maclysacht (1887-1986), served as Chief Herald and Genealogical Officer of the Irish Office of Arms, Keeper of Manuscripts at the National Library of Ireland and Chairman of the Irish Manuscripts Commission.
He gives the word stem "gáibhtheach"(anxious) as its origin and says that it is lately abbreviated to (Ó)Gacháin.
Anyway, I do like what Gearóid has written in answer to the animal sounds subject. And, Hey check out how close my cock's polymorph is to his animal sound. Ní bhfuil maith liom go bhfuil mé mo stoc féin a shéid, ach....(O.K. Somebody just smack me now. LOL!! :)
Ceart go leor!
Slán,
Maidhc.

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Lila (194.249.3.202 - 194.249.3.202)
Posted on Thursday, February 20, 2003 - 10:45 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A question to gaeilge coucil: can I use the last translation of Oliver?
I'm very thankful for your help - it was the heaviest project of all :)
I have some more questions: can I write "gaeilge-irish" with this translation? (I wrote it's original name and english name with every language). And should I put Irish flag with this language (I?ll put a little flag with each language - it can be flag of some country, ethnic group or town - I have different cases).
And finnaly: to whom should I send a book - you were all very kind on your web and on the beo.ie/ple web?
Many thanks to all
Lila

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James Murphy (217.78.1.159 - 217.78.1.159)
Posted on Thursday, February 20, 2003 - 11:00 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A brief suggestion: 'Mi/dheabha' or something like that instead of 'miao' which makes no sense in Irish.

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james (209.48.182.219 - 209.48.182.219)
Posted on Thursday, February 20, 2003 - 11:32 am:   Edit Post Print Post

This poor lady--she has made the innocent mistake of aking a group of Irishmen a question!!! Little did she know what consequences that would bring!!

Lila,

I would be presumptuous and say don't send a book to any of us--we have all attempted to contribute in some way. Perhaps someone could recommend a library or a charity or some other worthy cause that could make use of Lila's book. Any suggestions, Mo Chairde Uaisle??

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Pádraig Mac G. (205.244.12.110 - 205.244.12.110)
Posted on Thursday, February 20, 2003 - 11:37 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Hey, Y'all Chairde agus dhaoine,

I suggest we let Oliver field Lila's questions from here on. The last thing she needs is another 36 suggestions.

Maith thú, a Oliver.

Árd Mór ort, A Lila.

P.

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Lila (194.249.12.234 - 194.249.12.234)
Posted on Thursday, February 20, 2003 - 12:10 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I'm expecting at least 36 suggestions, what to do :) I think that James, Padraig, Oliver, Maidhc and Aonghus all can get one book and also Gearóid (or Sean, I don't know who wrote the translation first) from www.beo.ie/ple. I hope I'll manage to do that. And I hope I named all who were included in the translation.
Of course I'll write all your names in the book (so the rest of the world will see how gaeilge is a difficult language):)
What do you think?
(P.S: I'll ask you where to send you the books after it will be finished - this will last some months)
I just need to know for sure: do you agree with the last, Oliver's translation? Do you agree to write "gaeilge - irish" for this language? And do you agree to put irish flag with these sentences?
Slán,
Lila

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Pádraig Mac G. (205.244.12.110 - 205.244.12.110)
Posted on Thursday, February 20, 2003 - 12:58 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Lila,

I promised myself I'd say no more, but as Séamas (James) implied, that's impossible for an Irishman. I want to call your attention to the following sentence from Oliver's recent post.

This is the "word on the street" from the Gaeltacht of Cúil Aodh in West Cork, via www.beo.ie/ple.

This is a mixture of Irish and English with possibly a little Hiberno 'slang" thrown in, and very possibly you didn't catch the drift. It means that this last translation came from reliable, dependable native speakers who live in an area where Irish is regularly spoken. (Gaeltacht) I would use their translation if I were in your place.

Besides, if these lads are Corkers, I wouldn't argue with them.

Beannacht Dß ort,
Pádraig

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Lila (194.249.6.170 - 194.249.6.170)
Posted on Thursday, February 20, 2003 - 02:38 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Now I'm totaly confused. Oliver used the translation of Gearóid and added the voices provided by Aonghus. I thought this would be OK.
Without voices the translation wouldn't be so useful for the book - the point is on voices.
Should I ask Gearóid if he allows to add the voices? Or maybe this is not so clever idea?
My very best regards
Lila

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Pádraig Mac G. (63.161.61.84 - 63.161.61.84)
Posted on Thursday, February 20, 2003 - 04:39 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Lila,

Oliver appears to have put the sentences together with the sounds (voices) in his last message. I believe that list is now ready to be put into your book.

P.

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Bradford (66.231.2.8 - 66.231.2.8)
Posted on Thursday, February 20, 2003 - 05:37 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Lila,

Some of us don't know Gaeilge well enough to contribute to this thread, but please come back and tell us when the book is complete and how we can get it. I would love to get a copy for my 1-year-old daughter!

Le meas,

Bradford

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Lila (194.249.12.161 - 194.249.12.161)
Posted on Thursday, February 20, 2003 - 06:38 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

My dear friends,
you helped me a lot. I'll be very glad to add this interesting language to the book.
Maybe some young fans will join your web page, after they'll see the translations in the book :)

Enjoy in gaeilge
I'll be back
Slán,
Lila

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Thursday, February 20, 2003 - 08:37 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi Lila,
We seem to have agreement at last! Just one final adjustment (see below), I've changed "miao" for the cat to "mídheabh", it's the Gaelic spelling.
Don't worry about sending a book, but a mention would be nice!
Slán,
Oliver.
--------------------------------------------------
1. A HORSE NEIGHS: NEIGH – NEIGH
Déanann capall seithreach: Né Né

2. A DONKEY BRAYS: HEE-HAW
Déanann asal grágáil: íá íá


3. A SHEEP BLEATS: BAA- BAA
Déanann caora méileach: bea bea


4. A DUCK QUACKS: QUACK-QUACK
Bíonn lacha ag gogalaigh: bheac bheac

5. A COW MOOS: MOO
Bíonn bó ag géimnigh: Mú Mú

6. A BEE BUZZES: BUZZ - BUZZ
Bíonn na beacha ag crónán: bis bis

7. A BIRD CHIRPS: CHIRP-CHIRP
Déanann éan bíogarnach: tsíp tsíp

8. A DOG BARKS: WOOF-WOOF
Déanann madra tafann: bhuf bhuf

9. A COCK CROWS: COOK-A-DOODLE-DOO
Scairteann coileach: A CHÁICH, ÉIRIGÍ! ÉIRIGÍ!


10. A HEN CLUCKS: CLUCK-CLUCK
Déanann cearc glágarnach: poc poc

11. A CAT MIAOWS: MIAOW
Déanann cat miamhlach: mídheabh - mídheabh

12. A PIG GRUNTS: OINK-OINK
Bíonn an mhuc ag gnúsach: áinc áinc

13. AN ELEPHANT TOOTS: TOO – TOO
Trúmpann an Eilifint: Tú Tú


14. A FROG CROAKS: REBBIT – REBBIT
Bíonn frog ag crónán: Ribid ribid

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Lila (194.249.0.182 - 194.249.0.182)
Posted on Friday, February 21, 2003 - 08:12 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A Oliver, A Chara,
thank you for the final version. I'll repair the cat's voice (gaelic cats are talking very interesting :)
I had a great fun with your forum - you are all very kind guys.
I'll send you a note, when the book is ready - maybe we'll open a forum then, who should get a book :)
I wish you all the best
Lila

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james (209.48.182.219 - 209.48.182.219)
Posted on Friday, February 21, 2003 - 10:21 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Gentlemen,

We've done a good thing, here.

Oliver--Maith thú!

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