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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (January-June) » Translation of names « Previous Next »

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Kinnan (205.138.150.5 - 205.138.150.5)
Posted on Wednesday, February 05, 2003 - 09:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you in advance for your time and effort in translations. Could you translate the following names:
Leddy-surname
Lenora- first name (means white light I believe).

Thank you again,
Kinnan

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Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.103 - 193.1.100.103)
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 05:14 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Kinnan a chara,

You are probably not looking for a 'translation' of the surname as such, but you may in fact be looking for the original form, which is Irish. There has been a tendency to simplify matters, as the area of Irish surnames has avoided concentrated study. The gap has been filled in some way by commercial BunRattyism.
Take your pick :

Ó Lideadha (in Clare)

Ó Laidigh (Mayo-Galway)

Ó Loidigh (Cork)

Ó Lioghda (Tipperary)

It would be preferable to leave Lenora as it stands. If you don't prefer to do so and I take it that the name is female, 'Líoch', or 'Luach', or 'Finnseach' ought to do the business!

Ádh mór.

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Mirie (193.137.42.29 - 193.137.42.29)
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 06:24 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Failté

Does this names origin in Lugh, one of the Gods in the ancient beliefs?

Slán go fóill

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Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.103 - 193.1.100.103)
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 09:07 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Dia duit, a Mhirie,

The names were still distinguished from each other in the mythological cycle, despite a similar meaning concerning brightness, light. Taking from Old Irish L page, which you ought to go to, I'm posting the following :

At the end of Cath Maige Tuired,
Lóch asks Lug to spare him, which he does, and in thanks Lóch
bestows names on Lug's nine chariots for him. Lug then asks
him to tell the names of the charioteers and he replies "Medol,
Medón, Moth, Mothach, Foimtinne, Tenda, Tres, Morb."


Hit 'search the archives' when you get there for a lot of the questions that you may have :

http://listserv.heanet.ie/old-irish-l.html


Ádh mór

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Mirie (193.137.42.29 - 193.137.42.29)
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 11:17 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Seosamh, a chara

Go raibh maith agat for your explanation.
By the way, is there any internet file of leabhar gabala?

Slán go fóill

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Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.103 - 193.1.100.103)
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 11:51 am:   Edit Post Print Post

There are, yes, plural. Just doing a search on the net for 'Lebor Gabala' will get you the following comment, among others :

http://www.mar-de-cristal.com/triskel/HdM/1.htm

Faoi dheifir - shall send more later -

Slán go fóill

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.186 - 193.122.47.186)
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 07:30 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Mirie,

Here's an English translation. Bain sult as!

Slán,

Oliver.

http://www.ancienttexts.org/library/celtic/irish/lebor.html

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Kinnan (205.138.150.254 - 205.138.150.254)
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 11:36 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank your time in responding. My gradfather was a Leddy from Co. Cavan. I found the other responses very interesting. Thank you again.
Kinnan

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Mirie (193.137.42.29 - 193.137.42.29)
Posted on Friday, February 07, 2003 - 08:13 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Failté a Seosamh, a Oliver

Thanks for the links.

Seosamh: The link you´ve sent is in spanish, not portuguese. Hope you know the differences...

Slán

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Mirie (193.137.42.29 - 193.137.42.29)
Posted on Friday, February 07, 2003 - 08:22 am:   Edit Post Print Post

By the way, isn´t the history of 'Lord of the Rings' (Tolkien) much alike the the legends of Eire? And the elfic language much alike gaeilge?

Slán

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 04:22 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Eh, no.

I think you'll find that Tolkein drew much more heavily on Norse mythology than on Celtic.

His area of (academic) speciality, after all, was Anglo Saxon, which shares a lot with Norse in terms of Gods and Legends.

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Seosamh (206.112.42.77 - 206.112.42.77)
Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 05:02 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

The queen of Denmark was featured prominently in the documentary on television a couple of years ago saying how she enjoyed recognizing the Norse influence in his writing.
Dúirt ríon na Danmhairge ar chlár capéise ar an teilifíse cupla bliain ó shin gur aithin sí tionchar mhiotas-eolaíocht na Loclainne ina chuid scríbhneoireachta úd agus gur bhain sí ceol as.

I read that there's a strain of Finnish mythology in there too. Léigh mé go bhfuil a rian den mhiotas-eolaíocht Fhionlainneach ann fosta.

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Tomas OCathain (62.31.117.28 - 62.31.117.28)
Posted on Sunday, February 16, 2003 - 03:09 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Yes, Tolkein was also a linguist and that's where his interest lay. He created the languages first and then invented the peoples of his books afterwards to bring them to life. Also, Tolkein was displeased at what he saw as a lack of decent Anglo-Saxon mythology and legends. He remarked how he envied the Roman, Norse and Celtic mythologies.His works (The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings trilogy, The Silmarillion,etc) were his attempt to create a mythology for the Anglo-Saxon people. His world is supposed to represent Europe in the past. He identified the people of "Rohan" in his books as being the ancestors of the Anglo-Saxons and their language (Westron) is real life "Old English".

He had a very sensitive ear for languages,and had very strong opinions on which he found aestheticaly pleasing and which he did not.
While one of his favourite languages was indeed a Celtic one, it was not Irish but rather Welsh.
His other favourite was Finnish. He then attributted both of these languages to the Elves, the most noble and wisest of all the races in his books. Sindarin resembles Welsh in it's form, while Quenya resembles Finnish.
Correspondingly, he attributed languages he disliked to the villains. I believe that he based the Black Speech of Mordor on ancient Hittite, while Dwarvish was based on Semitic languages as well.

Sorry about that, I've become something of a Tolkein fanatic of late. :)

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