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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (January-June) » "The World Says No to War" as gaeilge? « Previous Next »

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Mickey Medlicott (65.178.32.68 - 65.178.32.68)
Posted on Sunday, February 02, 2003 - 09:21 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Can anyone tell me how to translate "The World says No to War" in Irish? (or a reasonable facsimile).

I'd like to have Irish represented in the Feb. 15th NYC anti-war march and rally, which is featuring posters in several languages (except Irish).

I've been going over possible words, but I don't have enough Irish to get it right.

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Pádraig Mac Gafraidh (205.244.12.192 - 205.244.12.192)
Posted on Sunday, February 02, 2003 - 10:44 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Michelín, A Chara,

Since there is no Irish word for "no," we'll have to come at this from the other direction:

Deir an domhan, ní cleachtfaimid cogadh go deo aris.

The world says, we will not make war ever again.

You may wish to keep checking back here to see if the native speakers concur with the syntax.

Ard mór ort,
Pádraig

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Monday, February 03, 2003 - 04:30 am:   Edit Post Print Post

"Diúltaíonn an Domhan do Cogadh"

The World refuses War

This is closest to the sense you want, and is short - good for a banner!

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Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.103 - 193.1.100.103)
Posted on Monday, February 03, 2003 - 07:21 am:   Edit Post Print Post

B'fhiú duit súil a chaitheamh ar an suíomh seo mar a bhfuil roinnt mhaith manaí frithchogaidh ar fáil :


http://www.craiceailte.com/CRAICNUA.htm


Hit the flower-power poster in the bottom left corner to get some ideas.

Ádh mór.

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James (209.48.182.219 - 209.48.182.219)
Posted on Monday, February 03, 2003 - 03:57 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Mickey,

As a soldier; former Special Forces Medic; former paratrooper with the 82nd Airborne Division, and having served a one year hardship tour in Korea during which time I woke every morning and looked across the DMZ into North Korea, as a soldier who has a brother overseas at this time and last but not least, as a current medical officer with 17 years of service defending your freedom to protest, I'd just like to say thank you.

Thank you for reminding me that meeker souls lacking the resolve to do and support the dirty business of keeping a world free from oppression and tyranny still exist.

Thank you for reminding me that despite the pacifistic approach to Hitler's Germany, despite the pacifistic approach to the Taliban and despite the pacifistic approach to Pol Pot short sighted, "peace at all cost" pacifists are hell-bent to denigrate the unfortunate, undesirable yet all too necessary tasks that face the young men and women of our United States Armed Forces.

And, last but not least, thank you for giving me that last little added push I needed to completely loose my lunch. The simpering, limp wristed, flower laden dribble that I have heard from your element had me nauseous enough--your posting helped to purge my already challenged digestive system.

Oh--you ARE welcome from the bottom of my heart and from the hearts of the MEN with whom I have had the distinct honor to serve. Men and women who rise every day at 0530 or earlier and leave thier families to run 3 miles a day, do physical exercise that would make most of your fellow protesters cringe, work until well past 1700 (that's 5 PM in case your are challenged by the military time system)then they go home and wait for the phone to ring to tell them that their country needs them to miss yet another birthday, yet another anniversary, yet another birth, yet another funeral--this is the life that these patriots live so that you can protest. You can protest without fear of retribution against yourself, your family or your community thanks to the brave and committed men and women whose daily existence I've just outlined; the diligent and dedicated souls who daily stand the gap between freedom and tyranny. Thanks to these intrepid Americans, you and a good part of the world can protest with a sense of security and with an assurance that the people of Iraq are currently without.

Protest in peace, Mickey. I, my brother and our brothers and sisters in uniform will be standing watch to ensure you are safe in your efforts. Despite your support we WILL be there, All The Way, bringing Freedom From Oppression, Out Front like so many of your colleagues are unwilling to do.

James P. McGinnis, II
CPT, United States Army

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Pádraig Mac Gafraidh (205.244.12.186 - 205.244.12.186)
Posted on Monday, February 03, 2003 - 07:12 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Just a thought, mo chairde,

Years ago signs were posted in saloons (pubs in Ireland) asking customers to refrain from discussing politics and religion. The reason: such topics lead to brawling and brawling is bad for business.

It would seem to me that brawling is also detrimental to learning Irish.

I too have an aversion to bleeding hearts whose public conduct often seems to undermine the truly honorable and praisworthy efforts of others, some of whom lay down their lives in defense of hearth and home; but the poor guy just wanted a translation, and it was to that request that I responded. I learned no Irish while reading the previous post. Nor did I learn any writing this one.

A Shéamais, A Dhuine uasail, cara, agus saighdiúir Meiriceánach, go raibh maith agat.

Slán agus beannacht Dé oraibh,
Pádraig

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James (209.48.182.219 - 209.48.182.219)
Posted on Monday, February 03, 2003 - 07:27 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Phádraig,

I concur with your recommended apolitical approach to this web site. However, when such a blatantly political request is made I find it difficult not to respond in kind.

I have a father who served 23 years with 2 tours in Vietnam and I cannot and will not forget the way his generation was treated by less honorable members of his own country. I see the same thing happening this time around and find it nauseatingly naive and short sighted. War is a terribly dirty business and no one hates it more than a soldier because he is the one that will bear the brunt of its brutality. I the anti-war movement, in this particular case, wholly unpatriotic and wholly unappreciative of the sacrifices made by the uniformed citizens of our country.

I apologize for any angst that my response might have caused. I am forever indebted to this site for its assistance in my endeavors to learn what I feel is one of the most beautiful languages on this planet. You are correct, this is NOT the forum to air political differences. However, you will find other postings on this site where America and Americans have been denigrated simply because they are American. We are responsible for the freedoms that exist in a large part of this world and I am sick and tired of those very freedoms being used to slap the face of Uncle Sam. Sorry--I just feel that way and will not stand idly by. America has its faults and I'll be the first to point them out when needed but right now some of the finest that America has to offer (my brother and myself, for example) are about to go off and possibly give their lives to free a nation (a nation of people of color, I might add, and a muslim nation, too)from tyranny and oppression and nobody seems to give two tinker's damns about that.

Le meas,

James

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Marcia (208.61.31.183 - 208.61.31.183)
Posted on Monday, February 03, 2003 - 09:17 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I've always liked these:

Saoirse, Siochain agus Ceart'
Freedom, Peace and Justice.

Buíochas.

Marcia

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Mickey Medlicott (65.178.17.96 - 65.178.17.96)
Posted on Monday, February 03, 2003 - 09:28 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Seosamh,

Go raibh mile maith agat. Feicfidh me tu in NY?

Siochain agus beannacht.
Mickey

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Mickey (65.178.17.96 - 65.178.17.96)
Posted on Monday, February 03, 2003 - 09:46 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Aonghus,

Ta tu ceart! Is maith liom e. Ta se beag agus maith le haghaidh na hocaide. Go raibh maith agat. ;->

Mickey

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Breandan DeHora (208.224.126.118 - 208.224.126.118)
Posted on Monday, February 03, 2003 - 10:21 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Jimmy, you poor demented sod. I'll not belabour the point that you are little George's cannon fodder. After all, you DID volunteer, didn't you?
One of the pillars of any democracy is freedom of speech, wouldn't you agree? Or is that freedom to say only what YOU want to hear? Let's get back to the real purpose of this Forum, and leave your gung-Ho mentality at the door.
God bless all here.
Brendan

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James (209.48.182.219 - 209.48.182.219)
Posted on Monday, February 03, 2003 - 10:49 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Brendan,

If you would notice, I have repeatedly stated that I and those like me readily defend that very freedom. I do not deny any right to speech, assembly etc. (Are you, in this case, saying that because I happen to differ politically that my speech is any less valid than Mickey's or yours?) I simply find it personally offensive that we, as soldiers who would readily lay down our lives for these freedoms, cannot get the support of those who enjoy the freedoms we defend.

I have lost friends in hostile action and in peacetime exercises in the pursuit of defending these freedoms. I know the true face of war and I know the loss that families suffer. As I stated earlier, no one detests war more than a soldier for we are the ones who must suffer its brutality most acutely.

I don't want war any more than Mickey or you or any other "anti-war" type. But, what I do want is a world where we all enjoy the freedom to speak our minds, assemble in our respective groups, practice our faith--all of those freedoms that we in the free world at times take for granted. Unfortunately, in order to obtain that goal, war sometimes may be necessary and should that be the case I stand ready to conduct it.

Protest your hearts out, I support your right to do so but, I find it to be personally offensive. I do, however, apologize for the vociferousness of my initial response. This is touchy ground and I apologize if my response was out of line. Reading it now, I feel that it was. I do ask that you please remember that there are some on this site who have a very personal stake in these apparently iminent hostilities.

I wish you well. Enjoy your protest. Some lonely soldier will be standing in the cold rain, or the hot sun going without food or shelter, manning his post so that you can.

Le meas,

James

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James (209.48.182.219 - 209.48.182.219)
Posted on Monday, February 03, 2003 - 11:28 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Chairde,

Pádraig was right. This has nothing to do with Irish. I retract my outburst. I apologize. We will agree to disagree and move forward.

Peace be with each and every one of you.

James

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.186 - 193.122.47.186)
Posted on Tuesday, February 04, 2003 - 12:06 am:   Edit Post Print Post

James,

Aontaim leat 1000%. B'fhearr liom maireachtail i ndomhan atá faoi tionchar na SAM ná domhan faoi smacht aintiarna amhail Saddam. Is áit contúirteach é an chruinne, táim buíoch go bhfuil do leithid ann.

I agree with you 1000%. I'd prefer to live in a world dominated by the USA than a world opressed by tyrants like Saddam. The world is a dangerous place and I am grateful there are the likes of you in it.

Slán,

Oliver.

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Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.103 - 193.1.100.103)
Posted on Tuesday, February 04, 2003 - 06:29 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A Shéamais agus a chairde,

Chonaic mé corr-rang Gaeilge a raibh idir dhílseoirí is aontachtóirí, phoblachtánaigh is náisiúntóirí ann. Bhíodh gach taobh agus an lár ag gáire nuair a tháinig cúrsaí polaitíochta faoi thrácht ann.
I have seen the odd Irish class which numbered loyalists and unionists, republicans and nationalists. All sides and the center laughed when it came to discussing politics.

Chonaic mé deacracht aon oíche amháin, ach níor mhórán é. I saw trouble once, in the social scene, but it didn't come to much.

Más í an Ghaeilg atá chun tosaigh, is cuma faoin easaontas de leataobh.
If the will to Irish is supreme, the peripheral disputes don't really matter.

Léirigh an scéala deiridh uait, a Shéamais, go bhfuil mianach sin na huaisleachta ionat. Maith an fear.


Is cuimhin liom uair amháin bean a theann aníos liom ag tráth caife agus a dúirt liom go raibh sí in amhras faoi bheith ag foghlaim na Gaeilge ar chor ar bith, mar ba aontachtóir í, de bhunadh aontachtóirí.
I remember a lady who drew up to me at a coffee break once and said that she was in doubt about learning Irish at all as she was unionist and all her background was unionist.

Luaigh sí an tIRA liom agus go bhféadfaí a rá gur ag foghlaim teanga an IRA a bhí sí.
It could be said, she felt, that she was learning the language of the IRA.

Dúras léi gurbh é mo mheas, nár labhair an tIRA an Ghaeilg ach aon uair amháin le linn 25 bliain trodaíochta, rud a chiallaíonn gurb é an Béarla a bhí ar bun acu i mbeagnach gach eachtra eile le linn an ama sin.
I told her that in my estimation, the 'RA' only spoke Irish on one operation during a 25 year period of fighting, which means that they used English in nearly every other operation during that period.

D'ainneoin seo, dúras, nach raibh éinne, go bhfios dom, ag bagairt éirí as labhairt an Bhéarla dá dheasca.
I said that despite this, nobody, to my knowledge, was threatening to stop speaking English because of this.

Is dóigh liom go bhfuil sí fós ag gabháil don Ghaeilg agus cé déarfas nach bhfuil an ceart aici?
I believe that she is still involved in Irish and who is to tell her that she shouldn't be?

Tá slí isteach, dar liom agus fáilte roimh chách go teangain bhinn na Gaeilge.
There is, as I see it, a place for everyone and a welcome to Irish.

Is mór an buntáiste an éagsúlacht dearcaidh seo inár measc.
This range of variant views is a great advantage to us.

Is féidir linn go léir an Ghaeilg a chur chun tosaigh sna réimsí éagsúla lena mbainimid.
We can all push the boundaries of Irish forward in the various realms in which we dwell.

Cuimhnímis go bhfuil 88,000,000 focal Gaeilge ar an idirlíon cheana féin. (Nic Eoin, Máirín, Cumann Merriman 1 Feabhra, 2003)
Cuirimis, gach duine againn, leis an méid sin!

Let us remember that already there are 88,000,000 Irish words on the internet. (Nic Eoin, Máirín, Cumann Merriman 1 Feabhra, 2003) Let us, everyone, add to them!

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James (63.176.24.38 - 63.176.24.38)
Posted on Tuesday, February 04, 2003 - 09:57 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I have come to feel like the people on this site are a part of my extended "family." You have helped me immensely and we have interacted in this insular world of electrons for quite some time. I wouldn't recognize a single face nor recognize a single voice were you to present yourelf on my doorstep. Yet, I do feel a common connection and have come to think of you all as friends. This got way to personal for me. I hope you can understand why.

Let us focus on the common aspect of our existence and leave the division of people and nations to the politicians.

Oliver, Seosamh, Pádraig:

Taím buíoch chun na léirmheasai.

Le meas,

James

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Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.103 - 193.1.100.103)
Posted on Tuesday, February 04, 2003 - 10:43 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Ní gá a bheith buíoch ar chor ar bith a Shéamais, tá fáilte romhat.
Is aon chomhluadar amháin na Gaeilge sinn.

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Seosamh MacBhloscaidh (206.112.42.77 - 206.112.42.77)
Posted on Tuesday, February 04, 2003 - 06:09 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Maith thu, a Sheamais. Ta cead againn, ar ndoigh, triall a bhaint as Gaeilge a chur ar mhanai donar dtaoibhse chomh maith.

Good for you, James. Of course, we can try coming up with slogans in Irish for our side as well.

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Donal Huilín (205.156.184.254 - 205.156.184.254)
Posted on Tuesday, February 04, 2003 - 06:24 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I agree with you, James. And I'm sure my relatives, who are buried all over Europe, would agree as well. Being a peacenik these days takes a lot less guts than stepping forward to say that war, while not pleasant, is sometimes unavoidable. How do you deal with a guy like Saddam? Coddle him like us and the Brits did to Hitler? That worked out well, didn't it?

Donal Huilín

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Bradford (66.231.3.59 - 66.231.3.59)
Posted on Tuesday, February 04, 2003 - 08:07 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A chairde,

If you really want to discuss politics then I recommend you try the Discussion Board of The Ireland Times, http://www.ireland.com. You'll get your fill!

It won't be as Gaeilge (although I urge you to post as Gaeilge :) ), but it's interesting nonetheless. I'm also sure there are Gaeilge message boards dedicated to such things.

Le meas,

Bradford

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Michael Noonan (209.246.90.222 - 209.246.90.222)
Posted on Tuesday, February 04, 2003 - 10:19 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Sadam Hussein pog mo thoin! Ta tu an-amaideach.

Dia Dhuit James;
Cro raibh maith agut for your service to America.

Slan agat
Michil

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.178 - 193.122.47.178)
Posted on Wednesday, February 05, 2003 - 12:04 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Bradford,

Tá achrainn as Gaeilge ar siúl ar http://www.beo.ie/ple ag an am seo. Ar an ábhar céanna, an gcreidfeadh tú? Bíonn píosa craic le fáil ann uaireanta freisin.

Slán,

Oliver.

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Paul (66.152.218.225 - 66.152.218.225)
Posted on Wednesday, February 05, 2003 - 09:03 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I prefer those times on this board when we're
exchanging ideas and suggestions and offering help, rather than when we're being contentious.

Le meas, Paul

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Seanduine (63.175.172.153 - 63.175.172.153)
Posted on Wednesday, February 05, 2003 - 08:42 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Mícheál Noonan, A Chara,

I take issue with your characterization of Hussein as amaideach because it is far too tame. How about some "ain" words like:
ainsprid
ainiarmhartach
aindiaga.

Howzat?
S.

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Duine mea/n-aosta (206.112.42.77 - 206.112.42.77)
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 02:28 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

An-amada/n ata/ ann. Ain-an-amada/n?

ain-duine?
ain-neach?

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James (63.179.112.60 - 63.179.112.60)
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 03:52 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I don't particularly care for Irish jokes and I promised myself to stay off of this thread---but--a friend just sent me this and I found it humorous.

Subject: Irish At War?

Saddam Hussein was sitting in his office wondering whom to invade next when his telephone rang.

"Dia Dhuit, a fear Hussein!", a heavily accented voice said. "This is Séamus (inserted my name here, to try and bring this thread full circle). "I'm calling you from that small bit of heaven on earth we call Ireland. We thought it only fair inform you that we are officially declaring war on you!"

"Well, Séamus ," Saddam replied, "This is indeed important news! How big is your army?"

"Right now," said Séamus, after a moment's calculation, "there is myself, my cousin Séan, my next door neighbor Liam, and the entire dart team from the pub. That makes eight! The only thing left to arrange is the rations."

Saddam paused. "I must tell you, Séamus, that I have one million men in my army waiting to move on my command."

"Muise! One million men? We hadn't counted on that many!", said Séamus. "I'll have to ring you back!"

Sure enough, the next day, Séamus called again. "Mr. Hussein, the war is still on! We have managed to acquire some mechanized infantry equipment!"

"And what equipment would that be, Séamus?" Saddam asked.

"Well, we have two combines, a bulldozer, and Liam has a farm tractor. We're still working on the rations, though."

Saddam sighed. "I must tell you, Séamus, that I have 16,000 tanks and 14,000 armored personnel carriers. Also, I've increased my army to 1-1/2 million since we last spoke."

"Ceart go leor! One and half million you say?" said Séamus. "I'll have to get back to you."

Sure enough, Séamus rang again the next day. "Mr. Hussein, the war is still on! We have managed to get ourselves airborne! We've modified Michael's ultra-light with a couple of shotguns in the cockpit, and four boys from the dart team have agreed to serve as our paratroopers! The food thing--well, we're working on it."

Saddam was silent for a minute and then cleared his throat. "I must tell you, Séamus, that I have 10,000 bombers and 20,000 fighter planes. My military complex is surrounded by laser-guided, surface-to-air missile sites. And since we last spoke, I've increased my army to TWO MILLION!"

"Two million, is it now? Maith thú!", said Séamus, "Give us a bit to confer, le do thoil. I'll ring you right back."

Sure enough, Séamus called again the next day with disappointment in his voice. "Lá go maith, Mr. Hussein ach droch sceal! I am sorry to tell you that we have had to call off the war."

"I'm sorry to hear that," said Saddam. "Why the sudden change of heart?"

"Well," said Séamus, "we've thought it over and we all agree that while we're well trained, well equiped and full of the warrior spirit, we're coming up a bit short on rations. We're a bit sensitive to hunger, An Gort Mór and all. So, mo chara, it is with a heavy heart I tell you that, while we would love to kick your arse to and fro we'll have to call things off. There's just no way at all we can feed two million prisoners!"


It's funny. It has Irish in it and it's not political---hope this mends a few fences.

Le meas,

James

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An Fear Cantalach (66.152.218.225 - 66.152.218.225)
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 04:07 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A chairde,

Suiomh suimiuil dhaoibhse.

http://greenparty.ennis.ie/press/gaeilge/slogadh-siochana_meanfhomhair01.html

Slan,
An Fear Cantalach

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Al Evans (208.188.101.145 - 208.188.101.145)
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 04:54 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

With regard to the original subject, it seems to me it would be best to use something like

Deireann el mundo nyet à la guerre

:-):-)

--Al Evans

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Michael Noonan (63.210.221.93 - 63.210.221.93)
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 08:36 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dia dhuit Seanduine;
Those are some appropriate names.
Husein ta se diabhalta!

Slan go foil
Michil

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Seosamh (206.112.42.77 - 206.112.42.77)
Posted on Friday, February 07, 2003 - 03:26 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Here's one for you to put Irish on:

If you want war, prepare for peace; if you want peace, prepare for war.

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 04:20 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Más mian leat cogadh, ullmhaigh síocháin
Más mian leat síocháin, ullmhaigh cogadh.

However I agree with (I think) Tucholsky in that the only use for this phrase was to provide a name for a nasty pistol,

(Si vis pacem para bellum)

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Seosamh (206.112.42.77 - 206.112.42.77)
Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 04:53 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

gunnán gránna?

Go raibh maith agat.

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Tuesday, February 11, 2003 - 04:18 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Fáilte romhat.

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Phil (159.134.209.75 - 159.134.209.75)
Posted on Wednesday, March 26, 2003 - 05:02 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I remember in an election there a while ago, when the people were at the booths, there were two choices:

"Tá" and "Níl"

So, I think if you just wanna say "Yes" or "No" in Gaeilge, you use "Tá" and "Níl"

Deir an domhan "níl" le cogadh

To be honest, I would've thought it would be better to use "Sea" and "Ní hea".

-Phil

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Thursday, March 27, 2003 - 04:24 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Ouch!
Tá agus Níl on voting papers are a cop out.
There is no simple way to say No or Yes in Irish.

Sea is a contraction of "is ea" it is
Ní hea means "it is not"

Depending on the question put on the voting paper the answer ought to have been
"Glacaim" or "Ní Ghlacaim" - I accept, or I don't accept.

The answer to a question re uses the verb in the question

Do you see him?
An bfeiceann tú é? Feicim or ní fheicim

So rather than trying to translate word for word (which rarely works) I suggested above
Diúltaíonn an Domhan don gCogadh - the world refuses war, which is the same as The world says no to war, but better Irish!

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