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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (January-June) » Confused about a definition « Previous Next »

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Kelley Hewett (65.247.144.121 - 65.247.144.121)
Posted on Saturday, January 18, 2003 - 01:04 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi, I'm new to this website and to learning Gaeilge. I'm also a writer and I'm writing a book set in medieval Ireland.

In one book I was reading about St. Columba, the author stated that his birth name was Crimthann, which he said meant "fox."

But after doing some research on this site, I see that "fox" is either "sionnach" or "madra rua."

If anyone could clear up my confusion, I would be very grateful. Thanks so much for your time.

Kelley

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Saturday, January 18, 2003 - 02:29 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi Kelly,
You know that's going back a long way, at least 1400 years. The word "Crimthann" is probably a word from Old Irish. It's kind of like a modern English speaker trying to read Beowulf in the original - a completely different language.
you could post on LISTSERV to the discussion group Gaeilge-B at www.heanet.ie. You'll find listserv on the sitemap.
They'll probably point you in the right direction.

Ádh mór leis an leabhar,
Good luck with the

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Saturday, January 18, 2003 - 02:34 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi Kelly,
You know that's going back a long way, at least 1400 years. The word "Crimthann" is probably a word from Old Irish. It's kind of like a modern English speaker trying to read Beowulf in the original - a completely different language.

Looking up "Crimthann on google.com it seems that there were several Irish kings of that name which suggests it might in fact date back to pre Christian times, when there was no written literature.

You could post on LISTSERV to the discussion group Gaeilge-B at www.heanet.ie. you'll find listserv on the sitemap.
They'll probably point you in the right direction.

Ádh mór leis an leabhar,
Good luck with the

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Saturday, January 18, 2003 - 02:36 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi Kelly,
You know that's going back a long way, at least 1400 years. The word "Crimthann" is probably a word from Old Irish. It's kind of like a modern English speaker trying to read Beowulf in the original - a completely different language.

Looking up "Crimthann" on google.com it seems that there were several Irish kings of that name which suggests it might in fact date back to pre Christian times, when there was no written literature.

You could post on LISTSERV to the discussion group Gaeilge-B at www.heanet.ie. You'll find listserv on the sitemap.
They'll probably point you in the right direction.

Ádh mór leis an leabhar,
Good luck with the book,
Oliver.

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Saturday, January 18, 2003 - 02:37 am:   Edit Post Print Post

sorry sbout my multiple post, just read the last one

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Kelley Hewett (65.247.148.124 - 65.247.148.124)
Posted on Sunday, January 19, 2003 - 01:12 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you, Oliver! You've been a tremendous help. I'm sure I'll be back here with more questions.

Kelley

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Monday, January 20, 2003 - 04:44 am:   Edit Post Print Post

My recollection was that Crimthann means "wolf" not fox, and is an Old Irish usage. I'll check and get back to you

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Aonghus (193.120.237.66 - 193.120.237.66)
Posted on Tuesday, January 21, 2003 - 04:09 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Having checked, Crimthann does mean Fox.

Many Irish names use archaic forms of animal or other names which are not used in Modern Irish

e.g. Art (Bear), Aodh(Flame) etc.

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