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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (January-June) » Grammar help, please. « Previous Next »

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Mike (68.168.83.24 - 68.168.83.24)
Posted on Saturday, January 11, 2003 - 12:40 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I'm having a bit of trouble remembering how to treat vowels beginning nouns in possession. That is, I remember that mo cota bcomes mo chota and sí gluaisteán becomes sí ghluaisteán, but I can't remember what would become of mo aigne.(How appropriate, LOL! B'fhéidir go mé faoi mo (?)aigne a fhiafraí díbh!)
Go raibh maith agaibh, roimh ré!
Slán,
Maidhc.

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Saturday, January 11, 2003 - 08:30 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Mhaidhc,
déanfaidh mé mo dhícheall chun cabhrú leat.
Tá an ceart agat faoin cóta, ach ní deireann muid choíche "sí gluaisteán". Sílim go bhfuil "her car" ar intinn agat, i gcáas sin, deirtear "a gluaisteáin", agus le "his car" deirtear "a ghluaisteáin".
Is féidir leat caint faoi fear agus a chóta, agus bean éigin agus a cóta.
Deireann muid "m'aigne", níl gá le "h" sa chás sin.

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Mike (68.168.83.24 - 68.168.83.24)
Posted on Saturday, January 11, 2003 - 10:06 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Oliver,a chara,
Bhí sé, go cinnte,ar m'intinn sin.Go raibh míle maith agat. Níl fhios agam céard bhí mé a smaoinigh ar.
So, would that be the rusult,or at least be the general rule,for all nouns beginning with vowels?
Slán,
Maidhc.

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.170 - 193.122.47.170)
Posted on Sunday, January 12, 2003 - 07:21 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Yup!
One less thing to worry about.
Rud amháin nach bhfuil cúis imní.

Slán tamall,
Oliver.

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Mike (68.168.83.24 - 68.168.83.24)
Posted on Sunday, January 12, 2003 - 08:31 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dia duit a Oliver,
Arís eile,go raibh maith agat, a uasail, don chuidiú.
It really has been one of those weekends. Or maybe a touch of cabin fever, haha.

Beannacht is bua,
Maidhc.

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Pádraig (63.161.61.39 - 63.161.61.39)
Posted on Monday, January 13, 2003 - 09:13 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Dia daoibh,

What follows as Gaeilge is a neophyte's attempt to translate the following:

"We praise you, O Lord, for all your works are wonderful;
We praise you, O Lord; forever is your love."

Molaim thú, a Tiarna' de bhrí go is iontach do gríomhartha;
Molaim thú, a Tiarna; is marthanach do ghrá.

Can anyone tell me how near to or how far I am from the mark?

Buíochas,
Pádraig

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Pól (64.21.69.3 - 64.21.69.3)
Posted on Monday, January 13, 2003 - 01:55 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Phádraig,

Here’s some partial help with
your posting...

“Mólaimid thú, a Thiarna...”

That’s how each phrase should start, I believe.
I’m not sure regarding the rest of it, and I’ll let wiser heads
chime in on this.

Ádh mór.
Slán tamall, Pól

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Monday, January 13, 2003 - 09:12 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

not claiming to be a wiser guy but I thought this might go someway towards a translation......


"We praise you, O Lord, for all your works are wonderful;
We praise you, O Lord; forever is your love."

Molaimid thú, a Thiarna mar is iontach iad do gníomhartha;
Molaimid thú, a Thiarna; is buan í do ghrá.

Slán,

Oliver

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Mike (68.168.83.24 - 68.168.83.24)
Posted on Tuesday, January 14, 2003 - 02:08 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

O.K. I'm no genius by any stretch, but here's my two cents worth.

Molaimid thú, Ó a Thiarna, óir is iontach siadse gach uile d'oibreacha iad.
Molaimid thú, Ó a thiarna, is síorí sésean do ghrá é.

Slán,
Maidhc.

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Mike (68.168.83.24 - 68.168.83.24)
Posted on Tuesday, January 14, 2003 - 02:57 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

After looking at this after I'd already posted it,(oops.),I think it should be more like this.

Molaimid thú, Ó a Thiarna, óir is iontach gach uile d'oibreacha iad.
Molaimid thú, Ó a Thiarna, is síoraí do ghrá é.

Slán
Maidhc.

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Pádraig Mac Gafraidh (63.161.61.33 - 63.161.61.33)
Posted on Tuesday, January 14, 2003 - 07:20 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dia Dhuit, A Maidhc,

I thought those DNS numbers looked familiar so I checked. Guess there's not much chance there's another "Gaeilgeoir fanaiceach" between Throop and Clarks Summit. We meet again.

This is turning into quite a learning experience. When I posted the question, I had hoped some member of what I have affectionately labeled An Garda Gramadach -- those native speakers who definitely know what they're talking about and whose skill I greatly admire -- would jump in and state unequivocably which part of my translation was correct and which was not. Instead, I find myself exposed to all sorts of "suggested translations," and the business of exploring each of them is proving to be quite a vocabulary builder, and a lot of fun as well.

I wish very much that this not sound like a complaint. Rather, it is an admission of my own limitations. I really can't tell for certain which of y'all's offerings are correct. Mar shampla: I suspected that Mike's use of síorí should have been síoraí, but what do I know? This is the most difficult language I have ever encountered, and the opportunities to make a mistake seem infinite.

So, a chairde, I don't know whether I speak for a majority of us learners, but as for me, the major difficulty is not so much going from Irish to English as the obverse. In short, I think many of us might really benefit from those who can answer the question: "Did I say that right?"

Thank you all for making this site available and for contributing to it. Should you recognize my name in some future posting, feel free to blast away at any errors.

Beir bua agus beannacht,
Pádraig

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Mike (68.168.83.24 - 68.168.83.24)
Posted on Wednesday, January 15, 2003 - 12:37 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A Phádraig ,a chara,
When I saw your name ,I also felt the same feeling about the possibility of "Can that be who I think it may be?"
I wish there were more fanaicheaigh Gaeilgeoir up here.Things could be so much simpler.
Anyway, as for examples of what, I felt,were some of reasons for the wording I chose ,OK,here goes.
First,I have to say,that I sometimes still have that terrible habit of trying to give translations which may be too literal.As in your own admittance, I'm finding harder to go from english to Irish.(D'ja ever notice how I spell Irish with a capital "I" and english with a lower case "e",hehe? Just checkin'. I digress.)And my biggest hurdle is not having any actual "speakers" around me.(I'm hoping that "RnaG" really helps!
That said, in the first part of the passage,I treated "Ó" as an exclamation in "Ó a Thiarna".Next came the difference between "gníomhartha" and "oibreacha".This is basically semantics.Like I said, I tend to give the more literal translation and this goes between one saying "deeds" or "works".Also,I put "gach uile" for "all" in "all your works" which seemed,by others, to be omitted.
The difference between "marthanach","síoraí" and "buan",I found ,as such-"Buan" does mean lasting and permanent, but also chronic.For this reason I felt it to be in the negative, such as permanent gridlock or chronic poverty."Marthanach" and "síoraí"are also a case of splitting hairs.That between everlasting and eternal.
There was also, in the first part,the handling of the word "for" in "for all your works are wonderful".Both "mar(go)"and "de bhrí go"mean "because",but "mar(go)",I took as "since you works are wonderful we praise You".And what if His works were not?Do any of us dare to face God with such underhanded worship? I think not!Next,I thought "de bhrí go"to be poetic though possibly,and feel free to "beat me like a red-headed stepchild" if you think I'm wrong,from the wrong point of view.It sounded like "we praise You from the strength of Your works",or something like that.Anyway,I just wasn't totally comfortable with it."Óir",I felt, was poetic from its relationship with "golden".It is also treated as a conjunction in this manner.(Hmmm, I feel a back hand coming.)"De bhrí go"is starting to sound a little better now.
I,myself,still prefer "Óir"over "de bhrí go" because of the way it gives not only a reason why we praise Him,but also poetically adds compliment to His "Golden wonderful works"through the use of the conjunction.
And,finally,has anybody tried to post this querie into the "Irish spoken only" forum.I'm sure that someone over there would knock this one out of the ballpark-or at least get a good hearty laugh at our gropimg through the dark!! LOL!
A Phádraig,agus a chách, is go brách fáilte romhaibh é.Tá dúil agam go beidh mé scéala a fháil uaibh gan mhoill.
Slán,
Maidhc.

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Mike (68.168.83.24 - 68.168.83.24)
Posted on Wednesday, January 15, 2003 - 01:29 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Hey,I'm back! I had a little brain fry and needed a break to regroup.
OK, I remember,or,ok,ok,I admit it.It occurred to me why I don't care for "de bhrí go".It's because it sounds similar to "mar(go)".
"We praise You since "mar(go)"Your works are wonderful." and "We praise You "de bhrí go" because or on account of(based on the strength of) Your works.----(Wow,man! The colors,the colors of this language-I'm freakin' out!)
Back again! And finally,FINALLY,I removed "siadse" and "sésean" from my final translation because of the use of "an chopail" which makes the entiriety of both phrases emphatic in their forms and to add emphatic pronouns would be redundant.
OK, I'm done now. :)) !!
Slán,
Maidhc.

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