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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (January-June) » Dialects. « Previous Next »

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Mike (pa-scranton7c-24.sctnpa.adelphia.net - 68.168.83.24)
Posted on Saturday, December 28, 2002 - 05:51 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dia duit,a chách,
First,I would like to say that Dailtaí is an outstanding site. The grammar section is concise and easy to follow and the forums are lively and informative.
Here's my question.I'm wondering which dialect you are concentrating on.I am really interested in learning the Connacht dialect.First,I've heard that it is the most widely spoken in Ireland,but,also because my family originally came from Mayo.
Any help would be very much appreciated.
Go raibh míle maith agaibh!
Mise le meas,
Maidhc.

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Thursday, January 02, 2003 - 08:48 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

This question comes up a lot. In the 1940's a standardised version of Irish was introduced to be taught in schools - this is what you will learn as a beginner. It picks up aspects of all dialects but is probably closest to the Connacht Irish from what I hear. I'm from Mayo too BTW but not a native speaker, faraoir. My grandparents never passed it on to my parents. My mother tells me that when the old people had some gossip which they didn't want the kids to understand they spoke in Irish. Nach mór an trua é sin.
It's difficult to understand how they could so blithely cast off their native tongue but it was done to give their children the best possible start in life, like all parents do.
Anyhoo, if you want you can look up Cló Mhaigh Eo on www.leabhar.com but I don't know if they specifically do Mayo dialect books.

These are two books from Iorras in Mayo which (I'm told) are the definite article:

Fánaíocht i gCondae Mhaigh Eo le Séamus Mag Uidhir
Idir Tráigh is Tuile le Séamus Mag Uidhir

You could probably order them over the net.
Hope you succeed in picking up th'Irish pretty well. Listen to Raidio naG on the internet and write in Irish on the various forums eg. craiceailte.com, beo.ie.

Beir bua agus athbhlian faoi mhaise duit.

Ádh mór,
Oliver.

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Mike (68.168.83.24 - 68.168.83.24)
Posted on Saturday, January 04, 2003 - 10:59 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Dia duit Oliver,a chara,
Go raibh míle maith agat don teidil leabhar.I've found "Fánaíocht i gContae Mhaigh Eo" and it sounds really good.Its discription said that its about a trip through the gaeiltacht in Mayo in 1938 and the people and things the character comes across.Pretty cool.I can hardly wait to get my hands on it.
Beo.ie is also very good with its help with idioms.Again,thank you very much.
Beannachtaí is slán agat.
Is mise le meas,
Maidhc.

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Michael Noonan (63.210.214.187 - 63.210.214.187)
Posted on Saturday, January 04, 2003 - 03:15 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dia dhuit Oliver;
Mise Michil.

I'm sorting through the dialects myself. My mother learned the Connaught version in school in Leitrim as a young girl. My father-in-law speaks the An Gaeilge Fiach (sp?) i.e. The Munster dialect. In a recent class we used "Irish on Your Own" which seems to have an Ulster dialect.

Would anyone know of Gaelic books with the Munster dialect.

Cro raibh maith agat.
Michil

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james (63.177.64.7 - 63.177.64.7)
Posted on Saturday, January 04, 2003 - 04:58 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

The Teach Yourself Irish book by Ó Sé utilizes the Munster dialect. I find the book somewhat helpful from a grammar perspective (no where near as good as Ó Shiadhal, though) but I find the tapes difficult to sort out. The narrator has a rather thick UK accent and I don't always catch the subtle pronunciation differences, as a result. If you're from the UK or your ears are "tuned" to that accent, you should have no trouble.

Le meas,

James

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Saturday, January 04, 2003 - 10:39 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A cháirde, go raibh maith agaibh go léir! I was just curious to see if this was a ghost page or not (clearly not) and my posting was sliding anuas into obscurity. Nílim ag iarraidh maithiúnas gach am a scríobaim ach cheap mé go mbéadh níos mó suim i stair na Stiubhartaí.

I you want a book in Munster Irish the two atá is caliúile ná:

Fiche bliain ag fás - Muiris O' Suilleabháin
An t-Oileánach - Tomás O' Criomhthain

of course, I've never read any of them but tá mé ar tí.

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Michael Noonan (209.244.179.163 - 209.244.179.163)
Posted on Sunday, January 05, 2003 - 09:52 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Cro raibh maith agat, a cháirde.

Mo athair ceile will be glad to see them.

Slan go foil

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