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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2002 (July-December) » Translation please « Previous Next »

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Robin Bittle (belleville-ppp128403.sympatico.ca - 209.226.251.30)
Posted on Thursday, November 28, 2002 - 12:18 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

My partner and I are planning to be married and were looking for a translation to the saying forever and a day. Could any one help us with this?
Thank you

R

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Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.103)
Posted on Thursday, November 28, 2002 - 12:41 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Robin, a chara,

I would advise : 'Go broinn an bhrátha'

which is sounded as : guh BRYN-yeh VRAW-heh

= to the breast of judgement.
Basically, till the end of time.

Ádh mór.

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James (209.48.182.219)
Posted on Thursday, November 28, 2002 - 02:33 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Sheosamhin, (correct vocative?)

How about Go deo agus aon lá?

Literally, (at least to my anglophilic ears)--Forever and one day.

Understanding that there is no indefinite article in Irish I thought perhaps the use of "aon" meaning "one" as in "aon duine" would convey the message.

Interested in how this sounds to the native ear.

Mise le meas,

James

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alec1 (m116-mp1.cvx1-a.dub.dial.ntli.net - 62.254.100.116)
Posted on Thursday, November 28, 2002 - 04:21 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

IF you were to say forever and a day in Irish -I guess it would have to be something like James suggested.

What might be a bit more easy on the ear is

Go deo 's lá.

But if I was asked my opinion I would not put into Irish a phrase which is non irishy(would never be heard) and which is embedded as a common phrase in another language.


I would concur with Seosamh that if somthing is going on a ring or something it should sound kinda authentic and irishy

A simpler phase than Seasamhs might be

Go deo is go brách
For ever and eternity

By the way James you are really getting there -congrats!

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james (209.48.182.219)
Posted on Thursday, November 28, 2002 - 04:36 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Alec, A chara,

I appreciate your words of encouragement. It's a wonderfully frustrating language (sometimes more frustrating that wonderful)and I do rely heavily on the input from this site.

Go raibh maith agat, aris.

James

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Edward Delany (p75-101.as1.dbn.dublin.eircom.net - 159.134.75.101)
Posted on Thursday, November 28, 2002 - 09:08 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

There are some idiomatic phrases that might be suitable;

"Go Lá an Luain " - Lá an Luain: the Last Day =forever

An older word; sithbhuan = forever/perpetual;

"Go sithbhuan" .

You could add "síorraí" - eternity - to this for double emphasis: "Go sithbhuan agus go síorraí". Not really necessary but, it's a matter of taste.

The nearest to the original English, while retaining Irish syntax, I would suggest as;

"An tsíorraíocht agus lá san áireamh" - lit. "Eternity and another day in the counting"


Is mise, le gach meas,

Éadbhárd Ó Dubhshláine/Edward Delany

Baile Átha Cliath, Éire.

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James (209.48.182.219)
Posted on Thursday, November 28, 2002 - 09:35 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Éadbhárd, a Chara:

This is an example of the syntax issue we discussed on your initial posting re: your book. I absolutely love the way

An tsíorraíocht agus lá san áireamh

translates but never would have thought to phrase it as such. It does sound so "typically" Irish. (I don't mean that as a stereotypical comment--it just has the ring of Irishness that isn't duplicated in any other culture.)

This is what I meant on the other posting when I referenced learning to "think" Irish. What a great asset to have available--thanks to all of you native speakers for putting forth the effort to keep us on track.

Mise le meas,

James

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Edward Delany (p74-213.as1.dbn.dublin.eircom.net - 159.134.74.213)
Posted on Friday, November 29, 2002 - 04:18 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Mo bhuíochas leat, a Shéamais. Thank you James.

Here is another one, also “typically” Irish, I would say;
Seo ceann eile agus múnla na Gaeilge air, déarfhainn;


“Chomh fada is atá fada ann” - for ever and ever.

(lit. “as long as ‘long’ exists”)


Is mise, le gach meas,

Éadbhárd Ó Dubhshláine/Edward Delany

Baile Átha Cliath, Éire.

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