mainoff.gif
lastdyoff.gif
lastwkoff.gif
treeoff.gif
searchoff.gif
helpoff.gif
contactoff.gif
creditsoff.gif
homeoff.gif


The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2002 (July-December) » "______ atá orm" or "_____ is ainm dom" ??? « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Kane (gateway.aas-moscow.ru - 217.26.8.72)
Posted on Tuesday, October 01, 2002 - 05:55 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Question,
I was looking at the basic phrases on this site and noticed that there happen to be two translations for saying what I thought was the simple phrase "my name is____". However both of the translations for the above phrases are exactly the same... "_____ is my name."

Is there some sort of subtile difference or it this just a ridiculous question?? :)

thanks...
John Kane

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

James (wcs1.norfolk.nipr.mil - 198.26.132.101)
Posted on Tuesday, October 01, 2002 - 11:47 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A Chara,

Never a rediculous question. There is no such thing. Literally, it breaks down like this:

Seamus atá orm = Seamus is upon me.

Seamus is ainm dom = Seamus is a name to me.

Conversationally, they mean the same thing.

You will also encounter:

Mise Seamus = I am Seamus

Seamus is ainm domsa = Seamus is upon ME

Seamus atá ormsa = Seamus is a name to ME

These are ways of emphasizing your name and indicating that you anticipate a response from the listener. It is a sort of implied form of "My name is Seamus...and yours?"

Grammatically speaking, the suffix "sa" is a contrastive particle added to a prepositional pronoun to indicate that a response is desired. Mise is a combination of "me" and "se", the slenderized version of "sa", and does the same thing.

Somewhere in my references I have a breakdown of the regional greetings. Of course, now that I want to find it, I can't but, I believe the ...atá orm version is more prevalent in the north. I'm sure the native speakers and/or Ireland dwellers can elaborate.

Le meas,

James

P.S. See how one simple question can generate an unexpected encounter with the complexities of this language?!?! Nothing is ever as simple as it seems. That's why there is no "rediculous question!!!"

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Kane (gateway.aas-moscow.ru - 217.26.8.72)
Posted on Wednesday, October 02, 2002 - 02:30 am:   Edit Post Print Post

If I could say THANK YOU in irish I would, but bearla will have to do...

I thought I might have gotten a "yeah they're the same" or something. This is EXELLENT! I'm going to print it out and put it in my notes!

Thank you, again...

John Kane

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

James (wcs3.norfolk.nipr.mil - 198.26.132.99)
Posted on Wednesday, October 02, 2002 - 08:04 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A Chara,

Thank you would be "go raibh maith agat"

the response:

Tá fáilte romhat


Le meas,

James

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Larry (host213-122-49-73.in-addr.btopenworld.com - 213.122.49.73)
Posted on Wednesday, October 02, 2002 - 04:09 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

... you'll also encounter the less formal "ná habair é" - don't mention it.

Le meas,
Larry.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Kane (gateway.aas-moscow.ru - 217.26.8.72)
Posted on Thursday, October 03, 2002 - 12:30 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A chairde,
Great! Go raibh maith agat! The help is much appriciated!

John Kane

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

James (wcs1.norfolk.nipr.mil - 198.26.132.101)
Posted on Thursday, October 03, 2002 - 02:31 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Second lesson.

If you say "Thank you" to one person it's Go raibh maith agat. If you are thanking more than one person it's

"Go raibh maith agaibh!"

Welcome to Irish!!! :)


Le meas,

James

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Kane (gateway.aas-moscow.ru - 217.26.8.72)
Posted on Friday, October 04, 2002 - 06:44 am:   Edit Post Print Post

LOL,
I have a LOOOOOOOOONNNNNGGGG way to go! Thanks again...
perhaps I'm drawing this out a bit to much but I figure as long as I'm getting answers I should keep learning...

Well... I have seen the closing "Le meas" in almost every conversation I've read... what is the meaning if you don't mind YET another question...:)

John Kane

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

James (wcs1.norfolk.nipr.mil - 198.26.132.101)
Posted on Friday, October 04, 2002 - 08:45 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Literally, it means "with respect" but is used like we would use "Sincerely".

On a related yet separate note:

I'm still new at this and can only offer guidance based on my experience but here's what has helped me.

1) Familiarize yourself with the prepositional pronouns. They are unique to Irish ( and other gaelic/celtic languages) and their usage can confuse you early on.

2) Learn the verb "Tá" in all of its tenses. That will make reading basic conversation easier. (There's nothing easy about it, this just makes it easiER)

3) Have fun!!!!! As soon as you get frustrated with your studies, put it down, take a walk, listen to some music and by all means HIT THIS WEBSITE! You'll find out you're not alone!!!

Le meas,

James

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dahid Maxham (cache-rk07.proxy.aol.com - 152.163.189.71)
Posted on Friday, October 18, 2002 - 10:26 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Excellent discussion. I learned alot from this one!

Go raibh maith agat.

Dahid

Add Your Message Here
Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.


©Daltaí na Gaeilge