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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (October-December) » How to write Salutations in Irish « Previous Next »

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Aíbinn hui Néill (198.107.42.194)
Posted on Monday, September 09, 2002 - 01:55 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Greetings all,
I am excited to have found this group. Thank you to all who go through the trouble to answer questions! I'm creating an Irish persona for the 10th-11th century. I'd like to end my letters with a proper salutation -- one in Middle Irish would be fantastic, but that's probably asking too much. Everyone in my group uses Slainte, so that's out. I asked for a translation of the phrase: Wishing you blessings and good dreams. However, that's likely going to be too long a phrase. Plus, I stupidly posted my question on another conversation list. Ah well.

So any ideas for simple and somewhat authentic salutations for e-mail and letters?

Blessings = ________ in Irish

Blessings to you = _________ in Irish

Good fortune = _____________ in Irish

THANK YOU!
Aíbinn

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James (wcs1.norfolk.nipr.mil - 198.26.132.101)
Posted on Monday, September 09, 2002 - 03:36 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Beannacht = Blessing

Beannachtai = Blessings (I may be off on the pluralized suffix)

Mo Bheannacht ort = Bless you (Literally: My blessing on you)

Beannacht De ort = God Bless You (Literally: God's Blessing on you)

Mo sheacht mbheannacht leat = My blessing go with you (Literally: my seven blessings go with you --- I think)

This is just a sampling of ways to say "Bless you" as Gaeilge. Word for word translations are often poor representations of the actual message intended. Irish is a language where even the smallest phrase in english can translate into pure poetry. As far as specific salutations, I would have to defer to the native speakers on this site. They can most likely provide you with some far more poetic and interesting colloquialisms.

Hope this gets you started.

Le meas,

James

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ursula forhan (k2a162-243.k2access.net - 209.170.162.243)
Posted on Monday, September 09, 2002 - 04:20 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A chara James,

Shouldn't that be "Aoilech!!!!"? ;)


Le meas,

Ursula

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Larry (host213-123-45-99.in-addr.btopenworld.com - 213.123.45.99)
Posted on Tuesday, September 10, 2002 - 08:32 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A chairde,

Beannachtaí (note the fada on í) is indeed the correct plural for blessings. There's also a fada on Dé, as in "Beannacht Dé ort"

You can also use (and it's frequently used in correspondance which I receive here) "Beir bua agus beannacht" - best wishes...

Le meas,
Larry

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Aíbinn (198.107.42.194)
Posted on Tuesday, September 10, 2002 - 10:16 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you James and Larry (and Ursula for the humor). :-)
Great information on salutations.

Now you've stimulated my curiosity. What does "A chara" or
"A chairde" mean? My best guess would be "Dear or Hello" for the A chara, and "Hello everyone" or something like that for A chairdre.

And what does "Le meas" mean? A lot of you seem to use it in correspondence. Does it mean "Sincerely" or "Truly"?

Thank you again!

Beir bua agus beannacht,
Aíbinn

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Larry (host213-122-153-125.in-addr.btopenworld.com - 213.122.153.125)
Posted on Wednesday, September 11, 2002 - 07:17 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A chara,

The expression "a chara" simply means Dear Friend in this context when addressed to one person. It's also used as a form of address in correspondance, similar to Dear Sir or Dear Madam. "A Chairde" is used when you're addressing more than one person. The root is "cara" (friend) and the "h" is added in the vocative - the A being the vocative particle.

"Le meas" means literally "with respect" and yes, it's commonly used in place of the English Sincerely or Truly. You'll sometimes also see "Is mise le meas" or "Mise le meas" - Is Mise meaning I Am.

Le meas,
Larry.

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James (wcs3.norfolk.nipr.mil - 198.26.132.99)
Posted on Wednesday, September 11, 2002 - 10:56 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A Chara,

Be careful!!! Now you're starting to ask questions that will invariably lead to a home study course, next you'll be addicted to this site and eventually you'll be contemplating a permanent re-location to a gaeltacht!!!

Le meas,
James

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Jeannette Brick Knauf (171.75.49.242 - 171.75.49.242)
Posted on Sunday, November 16, 2003 - 02:54 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Am about to write to a friend in Ireland. Her given name is "Ena", pronounced in English.. Ee-nah
Am planning to write in the Irish,(though selecting my sentences carefully) since she is fairly fluent in same and I am only learning...and thinking she will help correct my mistakes.

Am not familiar with the given name Ena, and wonder if it is an "Irish name".
Also would the salutation be OK if written..
"Ena, A Chara," ..no "h" before the "Ena", and capitalizing both the "A" and the "C" in "A Chara"?
Go raibh maith agaibh.

The thought has occurred to me as I slowly and frustratingly learn Gaeilge, that if the Irish could only have held on to their language, they would have foiled those awful Sasanach in a
nóiméad Nua Eabhrac! ~(:<))
(Have NO idea whether that last adjective is properly spelled!)
Jeannette

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Monday, November 17, 2003 - 04:40 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Ena, a cara
as she is female!
Ena is an angliziation, and as such would not usually have a vocative form.

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James (199.112.55.122 - 199.112.55.122)
Posted on Monday, November 17, 2003 - 07:06 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A Aonghuis,

OK. You've thrown me here. Why is it not Ena, A Chara? I thought the vocative demanded lenition in all circumstances where a leniteable consonant was encountered. You sure about this?

Le meas,

James

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Monday, November 17, 2003 - 09:47 am:   Edit Post Print Post

The rule for lenition which I learned many years ago was:
"mo, do agus a firinscneach"

However, I think I'm wrong in this case, and James is right.

Ena, a chara it is, being vocative

See http://homepage.tinet.ie/~eofeasa/level01/ceacht103/miniu/103b.htm

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Maidhc Ó G. (67.235.185.127 - 67.235.185.127)
Posted on Monday, November 17, 2003 - 02:12 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I took a look over at www.namenerds.com and found these :
Aodhnait, pro. EE-nit, meaning 'fire' and sometimes spelled - Enat.
Eithne, pro. EN-uh/EN-yuh, meaning 'kernel' or 'gorse' ans sometimes spelled - Enya.
Íonait, pro. EE-nit, meaning 'faithful', 'pure', or 'sincere' and sometimes spelled - Enat.
As far as I can tell, the final consonants are already slender in the above Irish forms so are already also in the vocative. In my opinion, you wouldn't change the form of an Anglicized name. So for your first letter, simply begin with, "A Ena" or "A Ena, a chara,".
Slán,
-Maidhc.

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Jeannette B (67.72.164.98 - 67.72.164.98)
Posted on Sunday, November 23, 2003 - 04:55 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

GO raibh maith agaibh, A Aonghuis, A Sheamus, agus A Mhaidhc...(hope that is correct,...if not, feel free...)

Jeannette

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Larry (217.43.57.197 - 217.43.57.197)
Posted on Monday, November 24, 2003 - 09:55 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Jeanette, a chara,

With James' permission, "James", in Irish, is normally Séamas - vocative "A Shéamais". Your use of the other names is correct.

Le meas,

Larry.

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