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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2002 (July-December) » Translation of a simple English phrase « Previous Next »

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dm oshea (12-236-243-2.client.attbi.com - 12.236.243.2)
Posted on Tuesday, July 09, 2002 - 11:23 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

My cousins have opened a shop selling crafts, art and photos from Ireland and/or with Irish themes. They've named their shop "Celtic Bliss" after a poem that one of them wrote. As a gift I'd like to have a sign made with the shop name written in Irish. I've found the two words in an Irish/English dictionary but could not determine what the proper construction would be. Anything worth doing is worth doing right!

Here's what I found (both as nouns)-
Bliss (or happiness): aoibhneas
Celt: Ceilteach

Can anyone help me with a sensible Irish phrase for this?

Thanks

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Fintan (neta.lisp.com.au - 203.21.133.124)
Posted on Tuesday, July 09, 2002 - 11:58 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dear Dm,
A fine sentiment! "Anything worth doing is worth doing right!" (Tús maith, leath na hoibre - A good beginning is half the work).

Aoibhneas C(h)eilteach - would be basically correct.

I'm not too sure about the 'h' in 'Celtic' as an adjective. But I'm sure someone here will correct it if it's wrong. So, DON'T rush out and paint/carve/purchase that sign JUST yet! *grin*

Le meas,
Fiontán

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dmoshea (host10.geomatrix.com - 65.198.47.10)
Posted on Friday, July 12, 2002 - 01:13 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dear Fintan,

Thanks for your information. No one's chimed in regarding the use of the "h" so I'll assume it's correct.

-Dave O'Shea

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