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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2002 (July-December) » Fáinne Gaeilge? « Previous Next »

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Dennis Patrick Leyden (dell-fegyb.uncg.edu - 152.13.196.199)
Posted on Tuesday, June 25, 2002 - 12:14 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I am finishing up a book on Ireland ("Ireland since the famine" by F. S. L. Lyons), and came across the practice of wearing a ring to signal that the wearer spoke Irish. Is anyone familiar with this practice? Has it died out? As someone who hopes to visit Éire someday, one of my concerns is how one knows to whom to speak Irish.

Dennis

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Kay (p383.as1.prp.dublin.eircom.net - 159.134.169.127)
Posted on Tuesday, June 25, 2002 - 06:36 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

It hasn't died out. The fáinne is a gold or silver badge in the shape of a ring. You wear it to show your willingness to speak Irish.

People who wear gold fáinne's are fluent speakers, silver fáinne wearers speak Irish fairly well and the fáinne daite wearers are willing to practise what they know.

Kay

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Fintan (neta.lisp.com.au - 203.21.133.124)
Posted on Wednesday, June 26, 2002 - 12:31 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A Kay a chara,
Cad is fáinne 'daite'? Cén focal Béarla atá air? I haven't heard of that one..... I've seen the 'Cúpla Focal' badge....

I think that the wearing of the Fáinne is an excellent idea. It advertises and promotes the language to those inquisitive enough (I've even been asked, post-release of "The Lord of The Rings" movie, if it was somehow 'Ring'-related..*chuckle*..). It also alerts other Gaeilgeoirí in the vicinity to the presence of a fellow linguistic-conspirator, so as to encourage public dialogue 'as Gaeilge'. All round a damn good badge.

Caith an Fáinne!

Le meas,
'Fiontán'

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Aonghus (vpn.parthus.com - 62.221.5.1)
Posted on Wednesday, June 26, 2002 - 04:14 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Unfortunately, if you don't wear a jacket with a lapel, it's difficult to wear!

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Dennis Patrick Leyden (dell-fegyb.uncg.edu - 152.13.196.199)
Posted on Thursday, June 27, 2002 - 10:54 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Go raibh maith agat. Tá sé ana-shuimiúil. An bhfuil fáinne dúinn tosaitheoirí?!?

Dennis
(Apologies for any mistakes; this is my first public set of complete sentences in Irish!)

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Fintan (neta.lisp.com.au - 203.21.133.124)
Posted on Thursday, June 27, 2002 - 09:06 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Aonghus a chara,
Níl, níl sé, a chor a bith.... I wear mine on anything, jackets shirts, jumpers, just gotta be cúramach not to lose the little clasp off the back...*gáire*

A Dennis, a chara,
There is a badge (the 'Cúpla Focal') available, which is a very nice colour enamel pin about 1.5 cm square.

I feel that anyone who is making a sincere effort to learn Irish should wear the silver Fáinne as soon as they feel they have SOME competency and fluency in the reading and speaking a bit of the language.

This opinion is not necessarily the view of evryone however, and I can totally respect their point(s) of view. The silver Fáinne (fáinne airgid) is usually awarded after some form of oral/written examination, and the gold Fáinne to seriously proficient speakers. The 'Cúpla Focal' badge was created to provide a sign for those who might not be that proficient in speaking the language, but who support it and wish to see it spoken, used and recognised more.

IMHO Irish neeeds all the public exposure it can get, and so if can literally speak more than TWO WORDS of Irish, you should avail yourself of either (or BOTH) a 'Cúpla Focal' and a silver Fáinne, and wear them with pride. I have had a few Irish tourists here in my hometown actually ask me about it (sometimes even in Irish! YAY!)

Mise le meas,
Créag (nó 'Fiontán')

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Kay (p492.as2.prp.dublin.eircom.net - 159.134.171.236)
Posted on Friday, July 05, 2002 - 04:06 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

This link has information about the Fáinne


http://www.forasnagaeilge.ie/info_other_sources.htm

Kay

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Tomás (d137-ps0-ros.alphalink.com.au - 202.161.119.137)
Posted on Monday, July 08, 2002 - 10:15 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Dennis, do not be concerned at all about who you speak Irish to, fáinne or no fáinne. It isn't illegal you know and proud Irish people will be delighted to speak it to you even if your Irish is better than theirs. Ireland is beginning to realise that without their own language they are just second-hand English (no offence to the English).

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kay (p383.as1.prp.dublin.eircom.net - 159.134.169.127)
Posted on Tuesday, July 09, 2002 - 06:57 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Tomás I don't agree that people are any less Irish because they do not speak the language. I haven't yet met anyone here who considers themselves second hand English because they speak English. By the way I think that Béarla is more appropriate as a description of the English language. It is a language made up of many other languages including Irish. So that even when you speak English you may in fact be speaking Irish.

Whatever Ireland you are speaking for it is not the Ireland I know. I find your remark offensive but you are entitled to your opinion. Tell me are you Irish or Australian?

Kay

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Fintan (neta.lisp.com.au - 203.21.133.124)
Posted on Wednesday, July 10, 2002 - 12:05 am:   Edit Post Print Post

The shackle has indeed worn through, if Béarla is considered the Lingua Franca (ha!) in Ireland. But that's just MY opinion. Agus is Astrálach mé, 'is tá bród orm.

Le meas,
Creag nó 'Fiontán'

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Kay (p300.as1.prp.dublin.eircom.net - 159.134.169.44)
Posted on Wednesday, July 10, 2002 - 02:41 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Fiontán, Cheap mé go raibh mé ag labhairt le Tomás.

Bíonn seans agam dul go dtí an mhóroinn (na hEorpa)anois is arís agus de réir mar a fheicimse is trí Bhéarla is mó a dhéantar gnó. Ní Éireannaigh na daoine ansin agus ní dóigh liom go bhfuil aon fhadhb acu le Béarla a labhairt,


Chuir mé suíomh idirlín ar siúl chun cabhair a thabhairt do foghlaimeoirí. http://homepage.eircom.net/~kuichinneide. Creidim nach n-úsáideann daoine an Ghaeilge toisc nach bhfuil sé acu. Déanaim iarracht an scéal a fheabhsú.

Léigh mé do theachtaireacht eile ina raibh tú ag cuir síos ar do pháiste ag labhairt na Gaeilge. Chuir sé sin gliondar chroí orm.
Má théann tú chuig leathanach na naisc, gheobhaidh tú súiomhanna eile maidir le Gaeilge a mhúineadh do do pháistí

Mholfhainn suíomh comhluadar go háirithe.

http://www.comhluadar.ie

Is Irish a school subject in Australia? if not why not?

Kay.

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Liam Ó Briain (newcache2.indigo.ie - 194.125.133.220)
Posted on Friday, July 12, 2002 - 04:53 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Aontaím le Fintan maidir leis an shackle worn through. Scríobh mé riamh anseo faoin ganntanas difríochtaí idir Sasana agus Sasana beag(Éire). Gan teanga againn níl aon pointe bheith neamhspléach ar chor ar bith. Kay níl aon leithscéal againn gaeilge a labhairt in Éirinn agus Béarla thar lear ar ghnó. I mo thuairimse siad Sasanaigh éinne anseo nach labhrann Gaeilge mar teanga.

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Sean (216.63.22.247)
Posted on Saturday, July 13, 2002 - 11:54 am:   Edit Post Print Post

But Liam, isn't that stance a bit over the top?
So are you saying that any English speaking nation
is merely the same as the English? Any French speaking
country is the same as the French? Take what you wrote
in context with the diverse culture and history of
the many nations who speak the same language.

Sean

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Ó Dúill (p468.as1.qkr.cork1.eircom.net - 159.134.181.212)
Posted on Saturday, July 13, 2002 - 01:57 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Fairplay duit a Sheáin.
Co-insidently I'am just after a few conversations with French about the same thing. They said Ireland was just another England though im sure they only meant it as a joke/slag.
Sure we share the same language (though we have modelled it to suit ourselves), we both like the races and soccer, we share the same mobile networks and purchase the same products but Éire = Sasana beag, ní cheapaim. And to say independance was a waste of time, thats crazy.
I am proud that my passport says "ÉIRE" and not "UK of BRITAIN and IRELAND" though thats not to say we are better, just different. Its natural to feel a grá for ones nation, to be connected with something others are not.
Anyway its actually impossible for to coutries to be the same. And could one get a better example than Irl. and Eng.?
And anyway to get back to the original topic. Where does one in Ireland go about getting these symbols of linguistic diversity? "3 rings for the Eleven-king..." lol
Colm.

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Karen McDonnell (cache-mtc-ah02.proxy.aol.com - 64.12.96.167)
Posted on Sunday, July 14, 2002 - 05:28 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Could anyone translate "tooreenlehard" for me?

Thanks!

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